Grammar error in site read-only message



  • There is a grammar (punctuation) error in the site read-only message:

    You may continue to browse the site<comma> but interactions may not work.



  • I'll just put it through my grammar checker...

    Unrecognizable word 'You' at line 1 column 1
    Unrecognizable word 'may' at line 1 column 5
    Unrecognizable word 'browse' at line 1 column 21
    Unrecognizable word 'the' at line 1 column 28
    Unrecognizable word 'may' at line 1 column 54
    Unrecognizable word 'work' at line 1 column 62


  • Leaving us with the sentence: Continue to site, but interactions not.




  • SYNTAX ERROR IN TEXT
    --------------------
    Misparsed token :
      but [CMENE] (line 1, col 18)
    Latest successfully parsed tokens :
      te [SE] (line 1, col 15)
      continue [BRIVLA] (line 1, col 1)
    --------------------


  • @Mikael_Svahnberg said:

    to si

    Fun fact: this means [open parenthesis] [delete [open parenthesis]].

    Another fun fact: sudo means [delete entire discourse] you



  • @ben_lubar said:

    Fun fact

    No.



  • Whether or not to put a comma before a conjunction is a matter of style, not gramming.



  • @flabdablet said:

    Whether or not to put a comma before a conjunction is a matter of style, not gramming.

    A few sources disagree:
    https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/607/01/, rule #1

    However, TIL that some sources, including The Chicago Manual of Style and the BBC, allow the comma to be optional if and only if the clauses are sufficiently short and clear that the omission does not obscure the meaning. I will grant that the clauses in this case are short and the clarity does not suffer by the omission. However, it is never wrong to include it; at the very least, you will avoid complaints from people who, like me, learned the comma as being mandatory and rely on authorities who claim likewise.



  • FWIF, the Oxford Guide to Style concurs:

    Use the comma to join main clauses that are semantically related, grammatically similar, and linked by one of the following conjunctions and, but, nor, or, and yet. Such clauses are joined by a comma if they are too long, and too distinct in meaning, to do without any punctuation at all, but not separate enough to warrant a semi-colon:
    ...Examples omitted...
    It may be omitted when the clauses are short and closely linked:
    ...More examples...

    ref: The Oxford Guide to Style, chapter 5.3 ("Comma")



  • Again, this is a matter of style only. The sentence is unambiguously parsable and means the same thing whether the comma is inserted or not.



  • @flabdablet said:

    unambiguously parsable

    Try saying that quickly ten times in Lojban.

    Also, I agree.



  • Try saying my username quickly ten times in whatever language it's already in :-)


  • sockdevs

    @Mikael_Svahnberg said:

    @flabdablet said:
    unambiguously parsable

    Try saying that quickly ten times in Lojban.

    Paging @ben_lubar



  • pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i
    pavysmu genturfa'i



  • But did you say it quickly?

    No, I don't really care.


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