Need Internet to configure Internet...




  • Message reads:

    ! Internet connection is down
    You must have an Internet connection to log into your Linksys Smart Wi-Fi account. To access your router settings without Internet access, enter the router password and then click Sign In. After you log into your router, select Connectivity and then the Internet Settings tab to view and change connection settings. You may need to contact your Internet Service Provider for assistance with these settings.

    Rebooting your modem and router may also fix the connection problem. To do this, disconnect the power cables, wait 2 minutes, and then reconnect the power cables.

    Now for the WTF: You couldn't enter the router password because the router always booted to THIS SCREEN ABOVE. No chance. "Sign in" was not a link either. So I need Internet connection to sign in, but I need to sign in to set up the Internet connection. :wtf:

    Thanks Linksys.

    (Solution: Took the darn thing home to my Comcast DHCP internet in order to have a chance to sign in and set up the PPPoE logon settings, then took it back to the client and it worked. If it hadn't, I would have had the client return it to the store.)



  • IIRC there was some outrage a while ago when Cisco tried to connect all their routers to their "cloud service" or something.

    I guess it happened anyway. Only even more poorly implemented.

    Routers are terrible. Small computers with a bad (often buggy) locked down OS you can't (generally) change, limited to doing only one thing. Fuck them.


  • :belt_onion:

    did you try with ip address directly? like 192.168.10.1 or 10.10.10.1 on LAN.



  • @redwizard said:

    If it hadn't, I would have had the client return it to the store.

    That would have been my first response. Routers with WAN-side configurability turned on by default strike me as a complete :wtf: - mandatory WAN-side configurability is worth at least :wtf: :wtf: :wtf:

    It's products much like this that have lead me to expect that anything with the word "smart" in the name will almost immediately prove to be spectacularly stupid.



  • @dse said:

    did you try with ip address directly? like 192.168.10.1 or 10.10.10.1 on LAN.

    That was a browser window. Yes, IP address. Always came up to that, even after factory reset.



  • @flabdablet said:

    anything with the word "smart" in the name will almost immediately prove to be spectacularly stupid.

    +1



  • @dse said:

    try with ip address directly

    I currently use a cheap ADSL modem that only works if you do that.

    Normal logon page:

    Same device via a local DNS name:

    Ignore the fuctup styling and try to log on anyway with tab and enter, and you get this:

    My router, though, I'm happy with:



  • Your refrigerator has a built-in SSH client?


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @dse said:

    did you try with ip address directly? like 192.168.10.1 or 10.10.10.1 on LAN.

    Yeah, it doesn't work. I tried to set one up a while back and returned the POS.



  • @anonymous234 said:

    Routers are terrible. Small computers with a bad (often buggy) locked down OS you can't (generally) change, limited to doing only one thing.

    They're terrible, yes. But most of them actually run on Lunix hardware, and you can easily replace the vendor software with OpenWRT (or one of derivatives) via firmware upgrade function, so they're hardly locked down. You're still tied to Lunix though.

    And being limited to one thing is good for most things. It makes them cheaper and more reliable. Note that "more reliable" doesn't imply "reliable".



  • @Gaska said:

    Lunix

    Why do you use a Commodore 64 as a router?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @anonymous234 said:

    IIRC there was some outrage a while ago when Cisco tried to connect all their routers to their "cloud service" or something.

    Some users of new Wi-Fi routers from Cisco's Linksys division complained this week that the company automatically updated the routers' firmware and pushed them toward a cloud-based administration service they didn't want.

    Cisco Systems said a privacy policy for the Cisco Connect Cloud service that alarmed some customers was a mistake and has been removed.
    ­
    [...]
    ­
    "We removed content that could have been misinterpreted as being inconsistent with Cisco's privacy statement based on a selective analysis," Cisco said in a statement.



  • This is why I choose routers that run OpenWRT when I'm not using pfSense.



  • @Luhmann said:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LUnix

    Not to be confused with Linux.

    Shit.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @Luhmann said:

    Why do you use a Commodore 64 as a router?

    Security by obscurity? Or, maybe he just likes a challenge?


  • sockdevs

    @Polygeekery said:

    Security by obscurity? Or, maybe he just likes a challengeslower internet than Milwaukee PC?

    FTF @ben_lubar


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    For posterity's sake:

    It looks like you can still bypass the cloud thing, it just requires some Hosts File hacking now.

    @the article said:

    Next, you would think you’d have to connect to the default IP address in a web browser.

    IT DOESN’T MATTER WHAT YOU THINK!

    Linksys still uses http://192.168.1.1 as the default, but now, when you browse to it, it immediately redirects you to http://linksyssmartwifi.com. Which is, of course, the cloud management portal we are going to completely avoid.

    So, first things first, you need to edit your local hosts file to map linksyssmartwifi.com to 192.168.1.1. That way, when you browse to the IP address, you are actually connecting directly to the box.



  • @izzion said:

    Linksys still uses http://192.168.1.1 as the default, but now, when you browse to it, it immediately redirects you to http://linksyssmartwifi.com. Which is, of course, the cloud management portal we are going to completely avoid.
    So, first things first, you need to edit your local hosts file to map linksyssmartwifi.com to 192.168.1.1. That way, when you browse to the IP address, you are actually connecting directly to the box.

    Wouldn't http://192.168.1.1/ still redirect you to http://linksyssmartwifi.com/, which would re-redirect you to http://linksyssmartwifi.com/, turning into a rabbit-hole of redirects that could only be stopped with gasoline and fire?

    I mean, it would still be better than using a linksys router, but not by much.



  • Question, is it called TP-Link because of how shitty it is?


  • I survived the hour long Uno hand

    I suspect that the redirect snatch in the router is only looking for the HTTP request header having the IP. So the DNS hack in your hosts file would result in an HTTP header with the DNS name, and it will thus not get captured and redirected by the router.

    INB4 I get a whoosh badge because DCRoss is an epic troll



  • My internet is actually significantly faster than MilwaukeePC now. Something about the Geneva Conventions.



  • @powerlord said:

    Question, is it called TP-Link because of how shitty it is?

    Now that I'm running a separate Debian box to do PPPoE, firewall and routing, then as long as the modem firmware provides some way to configure connecting in bridge mode I don't need to care how rubbish the rest of it is.

    TP-Link's hardware is generally fine and their prices are hard to beat, which is a useful attribute for any piece of gear that needs to be wired to the outside world where all the scary electric fences and lightning live.


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