Blakey don't ssh



  • Status: still installing shit. Got VS and SQL Server, now installing Git tools. Sigh.

    Remembering how much I hate SSH. How could connecting to an encryption server be made MORE DIFFICULT? Is it even possible? Jesus.

    How about, "hey you don't have a key yet, generate one?" "Yes." "Ok all connected, I'll shut up and go away forever now."



  • @blakeyrat said:

    How about, "hey you don't have a key yet, generate one?" "Yes." "Ok all connected, I'll shut up and go away forever now."

    This sounds about like my typical experience with ssh. Sounds like a personal problem.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    How about, "hey you don't have a key yet, generate one?" "Yes." "Ok all connected, I'll shut up and go away forever now."

    If you don't have a key to your house, can you just make a random key and hope to unlock your front door with it?



  • @ben_lubar said:

    If you don't have a key to your house, can you just make a random key and hope to unlock your front door with it?

    Somehow Microsoft Remote Desktop manages it. What's stopping SSH from doing what they're doing?



  • Does Microsoft Remote Desktop require a password or does it just let anyone connect to the server with any old key?

    Because SSH supports password authentication if your workplace hasn't disabled it.



  • @ben_lubar said:

    Because SSH supports password authentication if your workplace hasn't disabled it.

    Yeah well, SourceTree supposedly has a feature to connect to Stash directly without doing the SSH key mambo, but it doesn't fucking work because the product is a piece of shit, like all products based on Git. Even worse, it's not enough to use the CLI to make "CLI SSH keys" or whatever you morons call them, you then need to start a little GUI program and "import" the keys into it, then re-save them in a totally different file format, but when you paste the public key into the website it can't be the re-saved file format it has to be the original file format so if you deleted the original key files, oops fuck you you screwed up this 47-step mostly-undocumented process from hell.

    GitHub for Windows also has such a feature, but it doesn't work because our company's code isn't on GitHub, it's on Stash.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    GitHub for Windows also has such a feature, but it doesn't work because our company's code isn't on GitHub, it's on Stash.

    I have GitHub for Windows connected to a few Bitbucket repositories, and it doesn't complain or do anything stupid. I see no reason why it wouldn't work with Stash.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Even worse, it's not enough to use the CLI to make "CLI SSH keys"

    ben@australium:~$ ssh-keygen
    Generating public/private rsa key pair.
    Enter file in which to save the key (/home/ben/.ssh/id_rsa): blakeyrat
    Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): 
    Enter same passphrase again: 
    Your identification has been saved in blakeyrat.
    Your public key has been saved in blakeyrat.pub.
    The key fingerprint is:
    c4:5d:83:0f:e5:9c:35:45:d1:93:4b:2f:0b:a5:a4:0d ben@australium
    The key's randomart image is:
    +--[ RSA 2048]----+
    |           o+ o+*|
    |       . .E+.+.=.|
    |        o .B+o. +|
    |       .  . = ...|
    |        S    . o |
    |              .  |
    |                 |
    |                 |
    |                 |
    +-----------------+
    

    Well, I tried to make the parts I typed bold, but apparently Discourse doesn't support HTML.



  • It does. Tags don't work in <pre> blocks.



  • You're telling me this login screen:

    Supports Bitbucket? The one that says "Bitbucket" NOWHERE?



  • I didn't log in, I just copied my public key to the bitbucket website.





  • @ben_lubar said:

    I didn't log in, I just copied my public key to the bitbucket website.

    WELL FUCKING DUH THAT WORKS but that's not what we're talking about. JESUS.

    You: "SSH supports a normal username/password mode"
    Me: "I can't use it with GitHub for Windows because the code isn't in GitHub"
    You: "It supports BitBucket so it probably supports Stash"
    Me: "No it doesn't, you liar."
    You: "Oh right I'm a retard who should die in a fire."



  • Oh, I assumed that because you said

    @blakeyrat said:

    GitHub for Windows also has such a feature

    there was some way to make it log in with a username/password for each session instead of generating and inserting an rsa key into your account.



  • What point is this CLI gibberish supposed to be making? Yes I had to go through that horrible user-hostile process, thanks for reminding me and rubbing it in that user-hating assholes are in control of the source control industry.



  • @ben_lubar said:

    there was some way to make it log in with a username/password for each session instead of generating and inserting an rsa key into your account.

    THERE IS I JUST POSTED A SCREENSHOT OF IT YOU IDIOT BUT IT ONLY WORKS FOR CODE ON GITHUB AND MY COMPANY'S CODE IS NOT ON GITHUB.



  • The cli gibberish is that I typed "ssh-keygen" and pushed enter, and then it asked me for a filename and I typed "blakeyrat" and pushed enter and I left the password fields blank and it generated a key for me in like one step instead of twenty.



  • No, GitHub for Windows definitely uses key-based authentication. That dialog is just so it can generate a key and put the public key into your account.



  • @ben_lubar said:

    The cli gibberish is that I typed "ssh-keygen" and pushed enter, and then it asked me for a filename and I typed "blakeyrat" and pushed enter and I left the password fields blank and it generated a key for me in like one step instead of twenty.

    Ok.

    Now you have to make that key work with SourceTree. You're only 1/3rd of the way done with this awful process. Keep fucking going, smartass.



  • @ben_lubar said:

    No, GitHub for Windows definitely uses key-based authentication.

    Look, I don't care if it uses rabid muskrats carrying cat-5 cables, the point is: IT DOES IT SIMPLY AND EASILY.

    Implementation details do not interest me. You know that, of course, you're just being deliberately obtuse right now for some reason.



  • Really? Because the default if I hadn't typed blakeyrat would be to install the key as my account's default SSH-RSA key. And then...

    @blakeyrat said:

    Look, I don't care if it uses rabid muskrats carrying cat-5 cables, the point is: IT DOES IT SIMPLY AND EASILY.

    it can only install the key that way because GitHub provides an interface for it. Bitbucket also uses a website but has a different API for adding a public key. There's no way to make a program that works with all possible systems because some of them require human interaction to add a public key (for example, self-hosted git repositories don't have websites).



  • If standard passworded SSH is also available, ssh-copy-id may be used to set up passwordless authentication with a pregenerated private key.



  • Most git hosts don't have shell access enabled.



  • @ben_lubar said:

    Really? Because the default if I hadn't typed blakeyrat would be to install the key as my account's default SSH-RSA key.

    Right; but SourceTree can't use that key because it's not in "PuTTY" format.

    Dude, FUCKING TRY IT. I FUCKING DARE YOU. THAT KEY WILL NOT WORK IN SOURCETREE.

    @ben_lubar said:

    it can only install the key that way because GitHub provides an interface for it.

    So does the SourceTree/Stash combination, as I posted above. It's just that it doesn't fucking work.

    @ben_lubar said:

    Bitbucket also uses a website but has a different API for adding a public key.

    Ok? Good for it?

    @ben_lubar said:

    There's no way to make a program that works with all possible systems because some of them require human interaction to add a public key (for example, self-hosted git repositories don't have websites).

    THEN WHOEVER DESIGNED SSH SURE FUCKED UP DIDN'T THEY?!

    Why do you defend this user-hostile mess? Goddamned, what the fuck is wrong with you? Go find your grandma, tell her to set up a Git repo using GitHub for Windows and SourceTree, see how fucking far she gets.

    Hint: she won't get far at all because all of this shit is WAY TOO DAMNED HARD.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    THEN WHOEVER DESIGNED SSH SURE FUCKED UP DIDN'T THEY?!

    I'm blakeyrat and I don't like how some house doors don't open with the same key that opens my house's front door. This is obviously a problem with how house doors are designed and not in any way related to me misunderstanding the entire concept of locks and keys.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Go find your grandma, tell her to set up a Git repo using GitHub for Windows

    You invented a resurrection machine? Why have you not told anyone about this?



  • Hilarious.



  • I get how house keys work, I just don't want to grind my own. I'd rather pay the $3 and have the guy at the hardware store do it for me.



  • Yes, and in this case, the guy at the hardware store is ssh-keygen and there's a $3 off sale.



  • What a shocker that the guy who plays Dwarf Fortress doesn't understand the importance of usability.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    "The pre element represents a block of preformatted text, in which structure is represented by typographic conventions rather than by elements."

    "Authors are encouraged to consider how preformatted text will be experienced when the formatting is lost, as will be the case for users of speech synthesizers, braille displays, and the li"


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    What point is this CLI gibberish supposed to be making?

    Well, it reminds everyone of the defect you have about not being able to use a CLI.

    Next time you go to the DMV you should apply for a handicapped permit.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    I get how house keys work, I just don't want to grind my own. I'd rather pay the $3 and have the guy at the hardware store do it for me.

    Yeah, except he doesn't make new keys ab initio. The proper comparison is you buy a lockset and a screwdriver and take apart your front door.



    • you don't need to use <br> to make a newline
    • screen readers can't pronounce spaces and tabs

    Where in there does it say that formatting won't work?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @ben_lubar said:

    Where in there does it say that formatting won't work?

    Do you even context, Drax Jr.?



  • My formatting was a <b> tag. I have proven that <pre> can contain other tags, such as <b>, but also <marquee>, <h1>, and even <script>.

    What you replied with couldn't possibly have been a joke because you simply quoted the specification without adding or changing anything. Under US copyright law, what you did is not a derivative work.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @ben_lubar said:

    What you replied with couldn't possibly have been a joke

    The page clearly implies formatting will not be honored, and as you yourself demonstrated, much of it, in fact, is not honored.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Even worse, it's not enough to use the CLI to make "CLI SSH keys" or whatever you morons call them, you then need to start a little GUI program and "import" the keys into it, then re-save them in a totally different file format, but when you paste the public key into the website it can't be the re-saved file format it has to be the original file format so if you deleted the original key files, oops fuck you you screwed up this 47-step mostly-undocumented process from hell.

    A comprehensible version:

    1. Blakey does not know even how keypair authentication works
    2. Blakey blames OpenSSH for faults with SourceTree, although OpenSSH predates it by almost two decades
    3. Desperate for attention, Blakey starts throwing tantrums like a fucking infant

    Where's my "Keep calm and RTFMFM" shirt now.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @FrostCat said:

    honored

    WTF. When I tried running that word through a TTS engine (for shits and giggles, sometimes I do stuff just because) it pronounced the “h”. That sounds really weird…



  • @blakeyrat said:

    it's not in "PuTTY" format

    Of all the slight misfeatures in PuTTY, its failure to use the same format for keys as the OpenSSH project that preceded it is probably the slight misfeature I find slightly more annoying than any of the others.



  • @ben_lubar said:

    in this case, the guy at the hardware store is ssh-keygen and there's a $3 off sale.

    If you need keys in PuTTY format, you might be better off walking half a block down the street to PuTTYgen.



  • I'm going to blame this whole thread on SourceTree supporting the PuTTY SSH suite to the exclusion of all others. It would be much simpler if SourceTree supported OpenSSH keys like every single other Git client in the world.

    BTW, GitHub for Windows is pretty, but utterly useless. My favorite would be GitExtensions, because it layers on top of the official Git distribution, so it can use an ssh-keygen key directly.

    So:
    1 Install Git for Windows. Select all default options.
    2 Install GitExtensions
    3 Point GitExtensions to where Git is installed
    4 ...
    5 Profit!



  • Oh, I suppose I should mention how to set up a key.

    1 Open Git BASH
    2 $ ssh-keygen

    • accept all default options, including blank password
      3 $ cat ~/.SSH/id_rsa.pub
      4 Copy output and paste into online SSH key form

    Done. Everything should work.



  • @Circuitsoft said:

    cat ~/.SSH/id_rsa.pub

    Should be .ssh, not .SSH



  • @flabdablet said:

    If you need keys in PuTTY format, you might be better off walking half a block down the street to PuTTYgen.

    But then GitHub for Windows can't auth to the server, because I'm in fucking hell.

    Believe me, I've gone through this shitty process several times now. At this point, I know all the shitty bits by heart.



  • @Circuitsoft said:

    I'm going to blame this whole thread on SourceTree supporting the PuTTY SSH suite to the exclusion of all others. It would be much simpler if SourceTree supported OpenSSH keys like every single other Git client in the world.

    BTW, GitHub for Windows is pretty, but utterly useless. My favorite would be GitExtensions, because it layers on top of the official Git distribution, so it can use an ssh-keygen key directly.

    So:
    1 Install Git for Windows. Select all default options.
    2 Install GitExtensions
    3 Point GitExtensions to where Git is installed
    4 ...
    5 Profit!

    TortoiseGit works fine too as long as you install it and Git for Windows with the OpenSSH option.

    Fuck the cancer known as PuTTY.



  • @wft said:

    1) Blakey does not know even how keypair authentication works

    I know how it works: terribly.

    I don't see why I even have to participate in it, considering my company has a domain account and everything else in the universe is single sign-on. Again: this is just proof that someone at Git or SSH or whatever shitty open source broken ass you like screwed up.

    @wft said:

    2) Blakey blames OpenSSH for faults with SourceTree, although OpenSSH predates it by almost two decades

    I don't care who's to blame, I care that the current implementation is a usability nightmare.

    @wft said:

    3) Desperate for attention, Blakey starts throwing tantrums like a fucking infant

    Hell yeah.

    You risk someone making that idiotic "haha you said fucking and I'll assume you meant it literally!" joke and thinking you're a pedophile, FYI.

    Oh and BTW, it works fine, thanks for asking. I know how to do the damned thing (sadly my brain is loaded with all sorts of useless bullshit like that due to inconsiderate developers who give not one shit for usability), and complaining about it is not mutually-exclusive with completing it.



  • @delfinom said:

    TortoiseGit works fine too

    Last time I even tried to install it, it downloaded like 500 MB of uncompiled code files, then spit out about 347,324 errors.

    You have an interesting definition of "works fine".



  • @blakeyrat said:

    You have an interesting definition of "works fine".

    So do you. But of course no one could possibly have different experiences than you, eh?



  • Nope.


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