Dear ??bank-name??...


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    And btw: Fuck Off. My checking the box marked (paraphrased): "Don't pester me with marketing materials" also includes meta-marketing advertising your marketing.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    I think I blame (lack of) testing - clicking Update preferences produced the following (without the red boxes of course):

    So I had opted out anyway. Options 1-3 on the first question were basically:

    1. Forename
    2. Forename Surname
    3. Mx Forename Surname

    So no option for the more formal Mx Surname, not that it particularly bothers me since I'm not particularly enamored of anthropomorphic computer interfaces and would prefer to be presented with just my account list first in this particular instance.



  • @PJH said:

    Mx

    How do you even pronounce it? Meeks? Mixers? Mixalot?



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    Mixalot?

    So PJH likes big butts?


  • sockdevs

    @Maciejasjmj said:

    How do you even pronounce it?

    'Mix' or 'Mux' apparently:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mx_(title)



  • If this takes off I'll be changing my last name to "Record".


  • sockdevs

    Not Allot? Or D'Nutz?



  • Not sure I'm cool enough to pull that off. YMMV ;)



  • @Boner said:

    If this takes off I'll be changing my last name to "Record".

    For dwellers in the 1970s and 1980s, you could try "Missile". Then they'd be sending whatever it is to "Mx Missile"... ;)

    'Course, where I live, the choices are M (occasionally Mr), Mme, or Mlle, depending on stuff. That said, the French seem to like, after I talk about how I am calling on behalf of my wife, and even introduce myself as her husband, to address me as Madame. I don't get that one at all. My telephone voice is accented, English-style (duh), but until I started dealing with Froglandish bureaucrats, nobody ever accused me of being Mrs anything.


  • area_deu

    Maybe a typo like "MrS teve the Cynic"?



  • @aliceif said:

    Maybe a typo like "MrS teve the Cynic"?

    Doesn't work in French, but cute...



  • @Steve_The_Cynic said:

    Doesn't work in French

    Of course not ... nobody works in France



  • Do you prefer to have something like a dead bean or NULL?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    How about missing that line out entirely if the 4th option on the next screenshot is selected?



  • If they were doing that, it won' land in here. So it's not an option... :stuck_out_tongue:



  • What, no option for la forenamesurname.?



  • Yes, there is sanity in their madness



  • @PJH said:

    My checking the box marked (paraphrased): "Don't pester me with marketing materials" also includes meta-marketing advertising your marketing

    My bank used to send me frequent invitations to increase my credit limit. Then the regulations got changed so they couldn't do that unless I specifically opted in1. Then they switched to sending me invitations to opt in to the credit limit increase invitations2. Lately those seem to have stopped, though - I suspect another regulation change to close the loophole.

    1 Sometimes government regulations are good.
    2 Banks are still unethical and devious. Also, this is how I found out about the regulation change: the mail was along the lines of "We're no longer allowed to spam you with this stuff unless you ask for it, and we'd feel really bad if you missed out on our wonderful spam, so fill out this form please kthx".


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    My credit limit gets increased every year or two automatically. I rarely spend on the card any more, so I figure it's just improving my credit limit by making my credit percentage lower when there is a balance


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Jaloopa said:

    so I figure it's just improving my credit limitscore by making my credit used percentage lower when there is a balance

    If that's indeed what you meant, it can also decrease your credit score because you have a higher credit limit to spend against. Depends on who's doing the scoring.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Interesting. I read somewhere that utilisation percentage is a pretty major factor, but I don't claim to be an expert


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Jaloopa said:

    Interesting. I read somewhere that utilisation percentage is a pretty major factor, but I don't claim to be an expert

    As I said, it depends on who exactly is doing the scoring.

    WalmartCard may place more emphasis on how much debt you have outstanding as a percentage of [possible debt, i.e. limit on all cards|your annual income] and not give a stuff about the available limit.

    MaccyDsCard however may place more emphasis on the overall possible limit and not give a stuff about how much of it is used. (One unstated assumption is you could go on a spending splurge, then default, if you currently aren't using it.)

    There is no "One True Credit Score™" regardless of how much the likes of Experian or Equifax want to charge you to tell you 'your score' is 999.

    For example, companies who actually can provide you credit (hint - it's not Experian or Equifax if they did, then you certainly wouldn't be getting 999, at least not to the internal score they'd work out) look at things like "are you in a (well paying) job?," "how long have you been at your current address?," and (UK certainly, not sure about the US) "are you on the electoral role," and your likely future circumstances. And each company uses their own scoring methods like, the example above, placing different emphasis on things like available credit limit, absolute limit used, relative limit used.

    All the credit scoring companies do is base the score based on the information they actually hold, which is basically "what are your credit limits," "how much debt do you hold," and "have you defaulted on any payments," and possibly some other things they (within the confines of the likes of the Data Protection Act) can find out.

    And bear in mind not all credit companies report to all credit scorers, so any picture any individual credit scorer has on you (especially for selling you that 999) is limited to only what they know and is a significant subset of what those companies that actually provide credit actually look at.



  • [url=http://thedailywtf.com/articles/Similar-to-Snail-Mail]Could be worse[/url]


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @PJH said:

    "are you on the electoral roleroll,"

    It's like in “roll call”, and I think it comes from when the list was kept on a sc[b]roll[/b].


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Braino on my part...



  • @PJH said:

    Braino

    Is that

    or


  • The only score that really matters is:


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @tarunik said:

    The only score that really matters is:

    Because a consumer's credit file may contain different information at each of the bureaus, FICO scores can vary depending on which bureau provides the information to FICO to generate the score.

    That looks like 3 different scores to me.

    And are you implying that the score provided by FICO is the only thing that credit providers use to score customers in the US?



  • @PJH said:

    And are you implying that the score provided by FICO is the only thing that credit providers use to score customers in the US?

    Most credit providers rely on FICO for their scoring, yes.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @tarunik said:

    Most credit providers rely on FICO for their scoring, yes.

    Solely? That sounds all sorts of fucked up to me...

    Btw - which of the three scores do they use?



  • IME they pick one of the agencies. The score is probably a first cut, and depending on what they're doing (i.e., are you borrowing a lot or a little) they may dig into specifics to make a more qualitative or at least different quantitative rating of their own.


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