Bug Tracking Software Suggestions



  • Hey guys,

    I need to implement a public facing bug reporting software. I would prefer to go "off the shelf" here. My requirements are (in order of priority):

    1. Not Discourse
    2. Supports OpenID JWT Authentication
    3. Can accept emails
    4. Can accept automated bug reports via api call (e.g. error message generates bug report automagically)
    5. Is not 1990s ugly.

    Any suggestions?


  • sockdevs

    I believe Bugzilla fulfills those criteria; they have a playground you can test with



  • No OpenID


  • sockdevs



  • It's abandoned; and reports show it doesn't work

    If I knew any Perl, I might be willing to take a chance, but alas I know none.

    Edit: Otherwise, we are fine with bugzilla. Think anyone here would be willing to do some perl development for beer $? We are a startup, so we can't pay much (few hundred), but I'd guess any good perl developer could fix/confirm that plugin worked?


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    I like JIRA a lot and it supports everything you need AFAIK (you have to use a plugin for OpenID)



  • @asdf said:

    I like JIRA a lot and it supports everything you need AFAIK (you have to use a plugin for OpenID)

    Hmmmmm .... maybe I will play with that tomorrow after I try and configure bugzilla. Though that licensing model looks like a pile of :wtf:. It makes no sense.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @asdf said:

    I like JIRA a lot

    I don't like it much at all, but it does the business.



  • I believe The Bug Genie does all of those and looks less ugly than most trackers


  • mod

    @coldandtired said:

    looks less ugly than most trackers

    That is a beautiful four.


  • sockdevs

    @Yamikuronue said:

    That is a beautiful four.

    Some might say it'sā€¦ fantastic



  • I'm interested in this too, I am currently looking at potentially using TeamCity feeding into Buildmaster with issue/task tracking in YouTrack. However, JIRA may well be better and a full atlassian stack may be more cost effective.

    Any thoughts?

    Edit: That was a reply to @RaceProUK when it should have been a reply to the thread. Thanks discourse.


  • mod

    We're using JIRA; instead of OpenID, we needed to support AD authentication, and we don't have an api call set up so I'm not sure what the capabilities are like there. But otherwise, we're happy with it.



  • But 4 what? It's mysterious.

    Is there a name for feeling like you have to defend products you have no connection with? :smile:



  • @coldandtired said:

    But 4 what? It's mysterious.

    Bug Genie version 4. It's less mysterious with the text below that image. :laughing:



  • @coldandtired said:

    I believe The Bug Genie does all of those and looks less ugly than most trackers

    Well, it has OpenID, but it looks like you have to manually link the bug genie account to the openid server, there's no automated implicit flow registration/login. That's problematic. The whole point is to have only a single registration point.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @rad131304 said:

    that licensing model looks like a pile of .

    If you are a startup, it should be in your favor. You can license most of their products for $10 as a starter license.



  • @Polygeekery said:

    @rad131304 said:
    that licensing model looks like a pile of .

    If you are a startup, it should be in your favor. You can license most of their products for $10 as a starter license.

    I just don't understand the licensing model, making it hard to understand how our costs will scale if/when we grow.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @rad131304 said:

    I just don't understand the licensing model

    What don't you understand? Their pricing model is pretty simple really.



  • @Polygeekery said:

    @rad131304 said:
    I just don't understand the licensing model

    What don't you understand? Their pricing model is pretty simple really.

    Users isn't really spelled out well. Do they mean people dealing with bugs, people submitting bugs, or both?



  • I'd expect it's users having an account. So submitters, dealers, and managers wanting pretty charts.



  • @PleegWat said:

    I'd expect it's users having an account. So submitters, dealers, and managers wanting pretty charts.

    If that's the case then it's not going to work. at 11 users the price jumps to $1,200 from $10 and you never get back down to $1/user pricing until ~24K users. That's just for the basic software - it doesn't include the helpdesk.



  • @rad131304 said:

    Users isn't really spelled out well

    Is it not?

    ###How do you define a user?
    A JIRA user is any user that can log in to JIRA. Anonymous users may also be granted access and do not count against license totals.



  • @loopback0 said:

    @rad131304 said:
    Users isn't really spelled out well

    Is it not?

    ###How do you define a user?
    A JIRA user is any user that can log in to JIRA. Anonymous users may also be granted access and do not count against license totals.

    I did not see that anywhere, where did you find it?



  • It's almost at the bottom of the page. Just above "JIRA Blog".



  • Ah, I didn't scroll that far down.



  • @loopback0 said:

    https://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/pricing

    It's almost at the bottom of the page. Just above "JIRA Blog".

    Looks like customers don't count as users per FAQ:

    That's not bad. I'm bailing on bugzilla to see about it.



  • @rad131304 said:

    @loopback0 said:
    https://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/pricing

    It's almost at the bottom of the page. Just above "JIRA Blog".

    Looks like customers don't count as users per FAQ:

    That's not bad. I'm bailing on bugzilla to see about it.

    Boo, I have to self-host to use OpenID. I was really hoping to try it out on their system.


  • Grade A Premium Asshole

    @rad131304 said:

    at 11 users the price jumps to $1,200 from $10

    Well, in all fairness that $1,200 includes 25 users. $1,200 is really not that much money.

    If you really want to keep the dollar cost down, you are looking at rolling your own. If you could pare down your list of features, that might be feasible. Although with that laundry list, the opportunity cost is probably going to be pretty high.



  • @Polygeekery said:

    @rad131304 said:
    at 11 users the price jumps to $1,200 from $10

    Well, in all fairness that $1,200 includes 25 users. $1,200 is really not that much money.

    If you really want to keep the dollar cost down, you are looking at rolling your own. If you could pare down your list of features, that might be feasible. Although with that laundry list, the opportunity cost is probably going to be pretty high.

    OpenID is really the only must have - we don't want users to have to create a second account with us just to report a problem or get help after they already created one with us. OpenID seems to be a big ask just about anywhere, unfortunately.

    However, the FAQ says customers don't count against the licenses, so I'm exploring the software now.



  • So, today I decided to experiment with Atlassian's offerings, specifically Jira and Bamboo.

    Bamboo is for build automation, Jira is for bug/issue/story tracking.

    My conclusions:

    TeamCity is a lot better than bamboo, mostly in that it works really well with NuGet out of the box, and supports DotCover on the server for free and with minimal configuration. Other minor niggles bothered me about Bamboo also (generic patterns don't seem to exist, so for example I can't tell it to unit test all assemblies which match */*UnitTests.dll) also things like repository tree selection controls which exist on TeamCity for easily choosing what you are checking out for a particular build just don't exist on Bamboo. As such I can't use Bamboo at all without significantly changing things.

    JIRA seems good, but not significantly better than YouTrack, which surprised me, as I expected it would be. It has concepts like Epics/Stories baked in (through the agile extension package thing) which are missing from base YouTrack, but I will be able to either work without them or translate to YouTrack elements anyway, overall it doesn't seem worthwhile to switch to JIRA, particularly as TeamCity is looking like the weapon of choice for builds.

    This leaves me with only one problem, namely deployment management. I still need to fully evaluate it, and compare against other options. I just looked at octopus deploy, and since I don't have a fucking clue what a "tentacle" is - thanks for naming something which is of technical significance based on your branding rather than what it actually is, people who make Octopus Deploy - I am not sure whether it's likely to be any better.



  • @rad131304 said:

    OpenID is really the only must have - we don't want users to have to create a second account with us just to report a problem or get help after they already created one with us. OpenID seems to be a big ask just about anywhere, unfortunately.

    However, the FAQ says customers don't count against the licenses, so I'm exploring the software now.

    The OpenID integration is pretty abysmal - it doesn't show on the Service Desk Customer log in page, making it basically useless for my purposes.

    At this point, I think might just extend our OpenID Provider to have an HMAC endpoint and use freshdesk.


  • mod

    We use Bamboo and JIRA now :smile:

    @algorythmics said:

    generic patterns don't seem to exist, so for example I can't tell it to unit test all assemblies which match /UnitTests.dll

    Nah, you're supposed to define something like that in a script which you can just tell Bamboo to run. We do a lot of javascript, so we've got Grunt scripts that define how to test the codebase.

    @algorythmics said:

    things like repository tree selection controls which exist on TeamCity for easily choosing what you are checking out for a particular build

    I'm not sure what Team City has. We end up with a lot of repositories attached to a given build pipeline, and the source code checkout task can selectively check out some but not all of the repos to use in a given stage. If you have different trees in the same repo, you're meant to add them as separate "repositories" in the configuration so you can check them out separately. But you can't browse, which I think is what you're saying here? Which is super annoying, having to type the same info over and over each time I add a repo to a build.

    @algorythmics said:

    deployment management

    Bamboo has "deploy jobs" now, which let you configure how to deploy a given build. You configure a number of environments, and you can deploy any successful build to any combination of environments easily.



  • @Yamikuronue said:

    you can't browse

    yeah, that's what I was trying to say :smiley:. I can just foresee stuff like that being a real pain, and I don't think I particularly get any gain from it.

    @Yamikuronue said:

    you're supposed to define something like that in a script

    I have been in this place before, I'm fine with it in principle, but in practice I've seen it turn builds into more of a black box than I would like, and means that there's basically only 1 or 2 people who know what is going on. I prefer the ability to specify patterns as parameters as it has meant I just had to configure the build once, through the UI, and then everything works but can still be customized (e.g. it packages all projects into NuGet packages by default, but you can change that if needed), having configuration parameters like that feeding into a build script tends to lead to confusion and ambiguity, at least with the setup I have, every parameter can be traced back to where it's used in the web interface.

    I didn't get far enough with bamboo to get a good understanding of how it's deployment works, I know team city's is trash (it's just build configurations with different scripts), it wouldn't surprise me if Bamboo is similar, and I'm looking for something with that scripting in it, since it's necessary, but also the bumpf that goes around it, at the moment it looks a lot like shitty tentacle bullshit McGeeSoft's Octopus Deploy might be exactly the right thing. (A tentacle is a deployment target it turns out... that mapping makes perfect sense now I think about it :trollface:) although I'm pretty sure no prospective customer of a product has ever referred to it in that way


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Coming from a Java perspective, I use Maven to do deployments. I've got everything configured in a profile in my build (so it's not turned on by default) and then I have all the smarts in the build configuration, which is in version control. Only the login credentials and the actual location of the deployment target host are configured elsewhere (because we expose our VCS history to the outside world).

    It works well, and reliably. Or will do once I bring up the next incarnation of the deployment host. I've just asked for the old one's hardware to be scrapped because the disks are dodgy and we're moving between datacentres anyway. :smiley:


  • mod

    Bamboo can do inline scripts, which is handy, and variables that you can alter for a custom build, which is also handy, but it might not be your thing.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.