Obviously.



  • Continuing the discussion from Yami learns Powershell:

    @loopback0 said:

    If it's on a domain and it's a domain user then SERVERNAME\Username or Username@SERVERNAME will obviously fail.

    This must be the award winner for "least obvious thing ever described as 'obvious' on a technical help forum". And believe me, there were a lot of contenders.

    Thrilling adventure awaits in this World of Warcraft...WOW! – 07:16
    — retsupurae

    (Video unrelated, except it makes fun of a guy saying "obviously" a lot.)



  • Is there a :badger: for that? :laughing:


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @blakeyrat said:

    This must be the award winner for "least obvious thing ever described as 'obvious' on a technical help forum". And believe me, there were a lot of contenders.

    EDIT: Sloose is an idiot, nothing to see here, move along.

    Filed Under: :hanzo: edit



  • Well it seemed obvious to me anyway.

    In hindsight maybe it wasn't. Oh well, no-one's perfect.

    Except @blakeyrat, natch.



  • Saying "it's obvious to me" is one thing. You still sound like a dick, but at least you're not insulting people directly.

    Telling other people that something (which isn't even remotely obvious) is obvious and they missed it, that's a real dick move.

    The kind of thing where, if I said it, I'd have lots of little green PM notifications from moderators around here. But you won't, because I'm the only one who's subject to the rules that don't exist in written form and thus there's no way of telling whether I'm violating them or not.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    The kind of thing where, if I said it, I'd have lots of little green PM notifications from moderators around here.

    :rolleyes:

    FWIW, it does seem obvious to me, but only when I read it closely. Easy to read quickly / skim and not notice the difference. Certainly, it requires a bit of familiarity with Windows accounts, but not that much.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Telling other people that something (which isn't even remotely obvious) is obvious and they missed it, that's a real dick move.

    Ok fair point. It wasn't intentional.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @boomzilla said:

    FWIW, it does seem obvious to me, but only when I read it closely.

    +1

    I originally read it

    If it's on a domain and it's a domain user then SERVERNAME\Username or Username@SERVERNAME will obviously fail.

    Which not only is not obvious, it's actually false...

    Filed Under: Sloosecannon@gmail.com != Sloosecannnon@otherdomain.com


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @boomzilla said:

    FWIW, it does seem obvious to me, but only when I read it closely. Easy to read quickly / skim and not notice the difference. Certainly, it requires a bit of familiarity with Windows accounts, but not that much.

    It's obvious to anyone who's worked with multiple domains or similar use cases. It's the first thing I thought of, because my work's a bit weird (for the company size) in that we have 3 domains, and every machine in my office has a local admin account, because the corporate IT people don't seem to understand why not giving developers who have to install software admin isn't a good idea.

    I like to think it would be obvious to development types, but if you haven't had the experience in working in multiple domains, it wouldn't be.

    It certainly wouldn't be to regular users.



  • @FrostCat said:

    It certainly wouldn't be to regular users.

    Maybe. All it requires is noticing the changing words in the sentence, from domain to server. It really doesn't require that much external knowledge, but I'm not going to claim that most people will read it carefully enough. I sure didn't, at first.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @boomzilla said:

    @FrostCat said:
    It certainly wouldn't be to regular users.

    Maybe. All it requires is noticing the changing words in the sentence, from domain to server. It really doesn't require that much external knowledge, but I'm not going to claim that most people will read it carefully enough. I sure didn't, at first.

    ^That

    It's probably not bleedingly obvious to people that don't know how the login syntax works, but to anyone who does, his statement is fairly obvious.

    On-topic fun: This is why you should never let the computer guess what domain you're trying to log in to. If I'm logging in to my desktop, and say my username is Steven, do I log in as LOCAL\Steven or JE-D-002\Steven?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @boomzilla said:

    Maybe. All it requires is noticing the changing words in the sentence, from domain to server. It really doesn't require that much external knowledge, but I'm not going to claim that most people will read it carefully enough. I sure didn't, at first.

    I was primed to see the text because I was expecting it to possibly be a problem because I've run into that kind of issue, where you have multiple accounts on multiple domains, and one domain's accounts won't work on other domains (and local admin accounts that don't have permissions to view domain shares, etc.) But that's the kind of thing most people probably don't run into.

    If you aren't experienced with working with multiple domains I wouldn't expect you to realize the significance of the words, is all. I didn't until I ran into it, and figured the basics out.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @sloosecannon said:

    do I log in as LOCAL\Steven or JE-D-002\Steven?

    And the answer is, "it depends". I'm what passes for IT in my office, so I have a domain admin account--but that's not the administrator account.

    My domain account is just a regular user, so there's lots of things I can't do as me. Because of that, when I set up my own PC, I made a local admin account, because you have to, before you can join a domain. For a while I tried doing stuff as my local domain admin, but it was a pain in the ass, because Windows won't remember network share passwords, which means that if a lot of your work is on the network, you are putting in passwords all the time. When they gave me the domain admin account it made my day a lot easier.

    But futzing around like that makes you learn how the system works.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @FrostCat said:

    But futzing around like that makes you learn how the system works.

    +@

    I know a lot about Windows Active Directory for only one reason: I put together an active directory domain at home for all of our networked computers. Now I know a fair deal more than my peers about all that stuff...


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Geez. That seems like overkill.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Overkill, the best kind of kill.

    It is, but I learned a lot. Yet another one of the "because I can" projects



  • if you are into that try to make a samba server use the accounts from the AD.

    protip: you'll need an octogram and several candles



  • @sloosecannon said:

    It's probably not bleedingly obvious to people that don't know how the login syntax works, but to anyone who does, his statement is fairly obvious.

    Maybe you don't understand the meaning of the word "obvious"? If something requires experience and learning to know, it is by definition not obvious. You learned it, so now you know it. It's not obvious to you, it's something you learned and internalized. If you were able to grasp it the first time you saw it without any previous exposure to it, then it's obvious.

    Which means that nothing is ever obvious. Knowledge simply reflects experience.


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