Poop Adobe Poop



  • I get this error every goddamned time I open a PDF file, it's goddamned gibberish. Why does a file need to be 64-bit!? (Do you mean application?)



  • Judging by the ARM in the name, perhaps that exe's for windows phone using the ARM processor or something?
    *Vomits*



  • Sounds like they screwed up an update. I'd try a repair... oh wait, it's adobe. fuck that. Uninstall, (reformat your disk) and try again.



  • I like the fact that it tells you to "check your computer's system information" to tell whether it is 32 or 64 bit instead of, you know, just telling you.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Poop, Adobe, poop is about the order of events in my daily office routine. You guys that only use PDFs instead of being in an industry literally tooled around them have it great.



  • Adobe Application Resource Manager, a horrible piece of shit and not needed for anything. Just delete the named EXE and you'll be good.

    For actual applications this gibberish is actually useful to know, though it does raise the question: Why are you running 32-bit Windows?



  • I don't even know what's making it come up. There are so many questions:

    1. Why does double-clicking a PDF file look for AdobeARM.exe in addition to Adobe Reader?

    2. Why does my computer even HAVE a file named AdobeARM.exe?

    3. Why does that error say a file needs to have a certain bit-ness?

    4. If it means the application, wouldn't the issue be that this laptop doesn't have an ARM CPU, and have nothing to do with 32 vs 64 bits?

    5. I hate Adobe shit


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @TwelveBaud said:

    Why are you running 32-bit Windows?

    I never saw 32bit Windows with Program Files(x86) directory...



  • @Weng said:

    only use PDFs

    Except for when some corporate update screws the install up, and I can't read PDFs ever again.



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    For actual applications this gibberish is actually useful to know, though it does raise the question: Why are you running 32-bit Windows?

    I'm not.



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    Just delete the named EXE and you'll be good.

    That actually worked. Thank God I have local admin.



  • Either Adobe really botched an upgrade, or the file is simply damaged (PE header messed up). (It's on my machine too, pdfs are working ok)



  • Adobe Resource Manager, I think it's the auto-updater?



  • Then either that bullshit file is corrupt in a very specific way, or Adobe accidentally the PowerPC/Itanium/WinCE version of Adobe Updater.

    Still, just delete the EXE and you'll be good.



  • @nightware said:

    Adobe Resource Manager, I think it's the auto-updater?

    So the name of the application is Adobe Adobe Resource Manager?


  • mod

    @blakeyrat said:

    So the name of the application is Adobe Adobe Resource Manager?

    That would not surprise me in the least.

    Or it's Adobe Application Resource Manager.



  • Ass Ass Rectum M-- uh. MButt.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    So the name of the application is Adobe Adobe Resource Manager?

    No longer sure... It might be Adobe Adobe Reader Manager. So you can update the reader for your files in Portable Document Format format.



  • FYI, Adobe is named after a river that went by the founder's house... Or something like that... Anyway, TRWTF is using Adobe's reader.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Eldelshell said:

    Anyway, TRWTF is using Adobe's reader.

    While I agree, you'd think that the company that invented the format would know how to handle it best...



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I get this error every goddamned time I open a PDF file, it's goddamned gibberish. Why does a file need to be 64-bit!? (Do you mean application?)

    AdobeARM is just Adobe's bullshit self-updater. I generally just delete the .exe.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    1) Why does double-clicking a PDF file look for AdobeARM.exe in addition to Adobe Reader?

    1. Why does my computer even HAVE a file named AdobeARM.exe?

    2. Why does that error say a file needs to have a certain bit-ness?

    3. If it means the application, wouldn't the issue be that this laptop doesn't have an ARM CPU, and have nothing to do with 32 vs 64 bits?

    4. I hate Adobe shit

    1. Because Windows doesn't have a half-decent standard method for managing application software updates, so everybody and their dog just rolls their own, and the way Adobe's works involves having each of their applications try to invoke their updater on launch.

    2. Because Adobe.

    3. Because Adobe.

    4. You can't expect Adobe to check that ARM might already mean something other than Adobe Ruins Machines before adopting it for their own use.

    5. Correct.



  • @Eldelshell said:

    TRWTF is using Adobe's reader.

    Path of least resistance. Adobe's reader supports every feature of the format and it prints fast, so provided you install it in a way that has most of its options set to sensible defaults for your users, it causes less administrative work than any alternative I've found so far.





  • @flabdablet said:

    Adobe's reader supports every feature of the format and it prints fast
    Not just fast, but is more flexible than anything else that I've seen and it actually works. N-up? Poster? Poster after scaling? Shrink? Crop? It handles all of those and well. A couple of those are picked up by other tools (in particular, N-up seems to be well-supported via standard printer drivers on both Linux and Windows) but poster printing in general I haven't found anything else that worked.

    (And before you say the poster or pdfposter utilities, I tried those. On the files I was interested in, it gave me a bunch of blank pages as output.)



  • @flabdablet said:

    it prints fast

    :wtf:
    Last time I printed a 2 page document from acrobat my machine almost froze completely for at least a minute. I mean ... I couldn't even read TDWTF while waiting for my printout. I was forced to get a coffee.



  • @Luhmann said:

    I was forced to get a coffee.

    Sounds like a feature to me.



  • @Luhmann said:

    printed a 2 page document from acrobat my machine almost froze

    Acrobat, or Reader?

    I finally gave up on using Foxit Reader as our supported PDF reader after noticing that the reason 350 end-of-semester student reports took half a day to churn through the school's almost-industrial-grade color photocopier was not that the photocopier was slow, or the LAN was congested, or the print spooler was busy, or any of that. Foxit Reader was simply taking upwards of 30 seconds each to render each page and ship it to the print server. This, on a reasonably quick Core i5 workstation with GigE.

    Adobe Reader renders pages fast enough that the printer itself is easily the bottleneck, as it should be.



  • Reader. The printer is slow but the slow down is always before the message 'hey, I received a document in my spooler, I'll print it'.



  • Interesting. Does your workstation's print driver render to PostScript, PCL6 or something else? Is the printer on your workstation, or out on the LAN?

    Also, which Reader version do you have? 5 was quick, 6 - 8 were dog-slow, but it's been OK again since 9.


  • Notification Spam Recipient

    @blakeyrat said:

    1) Why does double-clicking a PDF file look for AdobeARM.exe in addition to Adobe Reader?

    1. Why does my computer even HAVE a file named AdobeARM.exe?

    Because Adobe Reader™ isn't just a PDF reader. It's a game-changing cloud-enabled technological platform that delivers strategic leverage to synergize the market resources of Adobe Systems Incorporated... OK, I'm not good at buzzwords. The point is: it's a complex thing that supports scripting, interactive 3D models, and other silly stuff, so it has to load a bunch of crap every time.


    Also I want to point out that SumatraPDF has always worked great for me. It's small, never gets in your way, AND it supports a bunch of other formats (ePub, MOBI, CHM, XPS, DjVu, CBZ, CBR) which comes in handy sooner or later. Never done any benchmarks on rendering speed but I haven't personally noticed any slowdowns.



  • I'm printing from a win7 client with acrocrab XI (because 11 is to mundane for Adobe) to a networked HP printer, spooled on some server. What has this to do with the fact that it freezes up my pc? I don't care it takes a while. Just pop-up some indication that you are preparing the print but allow me to switch to a different window and browse while I wait for the print. Like multitasking is a new thing or something.



  • @anonymous234 said:

    SumatraPDF

    Does the current version handle PDF forms? That was the dealbreaker last time I looked at it, if I recall correctly.



  • @Luhmann said:

    a networked HP printer

    Probably PCL6 then, which will involve shipping a massive high-resolution pixmap over the LAN. Personally I would be looking sideways at the HP printer driver before sheeting the blame home to Adobe; I would not be at all surprised to find that the driver does input and rendering in the same thread. I generally avoid HP printers purely because their drivers have been complete fucking disasters since whatever superseded the Laserjet 4P.



  • In every thread concerning PDFs there is always a discussion of Acrobat vs Foxit and SumatraPDF but I never see anything about XChange Viewer.

    I switched to it when Foxit started getting bloated and it seems to be working as well now as back then.

    I've never printed anything with it, though, so have no idea how fast it is to do that.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @flabdablet said:

    I generally avoid HP printers purely because their drivers have been complete fucking disasters since whatever superseded the Laserjet 4P.

    We like HP printers, but we always get them with PS support.



  • @dkf said:

    We like HP printers

    They are no longer built like tanks the way they were in the 4P era, but their paper handling is usually completely trouble-free which is nice. I don't like HP's inkjets because the ink is actually a little corrosive, and splashed ink tends to find its way between the cartridge and the socket and it chews out the contacts.

    But the drivers, and in particular the driver installers, are just horrid. Half the time they involve installing a fucking web server on your workstation just so you can monitor the ink levels. And if you try to avoid that by downloading a driver-only package from their support site, well you'd better hope it installs correctly on the first shot, because if it doesn't it's just as likely to eat the print spooler service badly enough to make a Windows nuke and pave your path of least wasted time. Grrrr.

    Samsung lasers have moderately rubbish paper handling but 3rd-party supplies are dirt cheap, readily available and don't break the printers or their drivers. And the drivers, in my experience, always install smoothly and trouble-free*.

    At some stage I would like to have a play with Oki's LED-array toys - it would be nice to get rid of all those moving parts devoted to beam scanning.

    *I have switched our Samsung fleet from PS to PCL6 though, after one of the teachers found a document that crashed the printer (not the driver) when printed via the PS driver. I had actually taken the printer apart, looking for a bad RAM socket or loose connection, before I thought to try printing the same document with PCL6.



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    Why are you running 32-bit Windows?

    Funny thing: my tablet technically has a 64-bit processor, but for some reason all 64-bit Windowses(?) refuse to install at the boot stage - you just get the "image is unsupported" or whatever in the UEFI shell.

    So hey, 32-bit Windows is still useful.

    @anonymous234 said:

    Also I want to point out that SumatraPDF has always worked great for me.

    Seconded. It's always on my "fresh system install" list.


  • Notification Spam Recipient

    @flabdablet said:

    Does the current version handle PDF forms? That was the dealbreaker last time I looked at it, if I recall correctly.

    I don't think so... But another suggestion: Google Chrome. It can display every PDF I've tried, has a simple interface and supports forms.

    Or Firefox... if you don't mind waiting a couple seconds for every page to render.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Why does a file need to be 64-bit!? (Do you mean application?)

    So, TRWTF is Windows for using the word "file" instead of "application" when it means the file containing the application?



  • @anonymous234 said:

    Firefox...

    I was so pissed off when a Firefox update suddenly made that particularly shitty PDF viewer the default and changed a bunch of default PDF-handling preferences so that simply turning it off in about:config was not sufficient to put things back the way they were before.

    Wouldn't have been so bad except that pdfjs gets printing a PDF, which is the most common operation that teachers do with web-delivered PDFs, so comprehensively wrong.



  • Of course linux does this way better... oh wait

    $ ctags
    bash: /redacted/ctags: cannot execute binary file
    

    Needs explicit digging:

    $ uname -mpi
    x86_64 x86_64 x86_64
    $ file /redacted/ctags
    /redacted/ctags: sparc demand paged dynamically linked executable not stripped
    

    TRWTF is that that binary is even present in what should be a linux 64-bits install directory.



  • Files do not contain applications. Applications contain files, which contain programs.



  • Is that in fact a genuine sparc binary, or just an x86_64 one that's suffered a little bitrot?



  • I would not know how to tell the difference. The file does not start with an ELF magic number.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Luhmann said:

    Last time I printed a 2 page document from acrobat my machine almost froze completely for at least a minute. I mean ... I couldn't even read TDWTF while waiting for my printout. I was forced to get a coffee.
    This is likely an issue with the particular PDF and your printer driver being miles apart. Windows' driver model lives and breathes PostScript.

    PDF is basically heavily extended PostScript, so the PDF reader has a pretty straightforward job.

    PostScript is very good at vectors and text, but absolutely terrible at raster graphics. The PDF reader has to transliterate your raster graphics into a rather shit bitmaplike format.

    Many printers don't do PostScript. Their driver has to convert the PostScript to whatever the fuck they do support. Many of these choke on raster graphics beyond a certain size.



  • @Gaska said:

    So, TRWTF is Windows for using the word "file" instead of "application" when it means the file containing the application?

    Are you so invested in trying to make me look like an idiot that you'd type gibberish like this? Get a hobby.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    I think he's trying to take up trolling, but he's not doing really well...


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Weng said:

    PDF is basically heavily extended PostScript

    It's mostly heavily restricted. All the fun things that make PostScript a real (but really annoying) language are turned off in PDF.

    Instead some moron added embedded Javascript. :facepalm:



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Are you so invested in trying to make me look like an idiot that you'd type gibberish like this? Get a hobby.

    Are you so invested in trying to make me look like an idiot that you'd reply to my gibberish? Get a hobby.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.