Firefox "Compatible"



  • http://www.ripitdownloads.com/partners/Ripit/BrowserNotSupported.aspx?partner=180

    Take a look at their helpful step-by-step instructions to make "firefox" compatible with their website.

     

    (For the uninitiated, IE tab is an extension that allows you to use the IE browser control in a Firefox tab - essentially IE with the Firefox chrome. No dice for mac/linux users)
     



  • I wonder what would happen if you try to transfer the music they sell to something other than the Zune. Let me guess:


    If you are using Apple iPod,
    please follow this
    step by step guide on how to enable the iPod to play the tracks you have purchased:

    1. Purchase a replacement circuit board, clickerwheel, hard drive, and LCD for the Zune music player from your local Microsoft manufacturing center.
    2. Place your iPod on a hard, flat surface.
    3. Using a Dremel or other rotary device, carefully cut away the shell of your iPod.
    4. Remove the circuitry and other parts from your iPod, leaving only the shell.
    5. Insert the Zune internal components into the iPod casing. You may have to widen the case to accommodate the Zune LCD display.
    6. Using duct tape, secure the components to the casing. You may now play Zipit-licensed music on your iPod music player.



  • [quote user="MrMan"]Place your iPod on a hard, flat surface.[/quote]

    You mean a wooden table, right? 



  • Soundbuzz and DSE cannot guarantee that all of the material purported to be the
    copyright of artists are in fact their copyright. In the event that you believe
    that any material appearing on these pages is the copyright of someone other
    than who it purports to belong to, then please contact us at <font color="#cc6633">admin@soundbuzz.com</font> .

    Isn't that -- essentially, thought not exactly -- the same argument of AllofMP3? "We're charging and paying the people who say that they're representing the music, but if something's fishy, that's not really our mistake/problem."

    3.2 You may not use any "deep-link", "page-scrape", "robot", "spider" or other
    automatic device, program, algorithm or methodology, or any similar or
    equivalent manual process, to access, acquire, copy or monitor any portion of
    the Website, or in any way reproduce or circumvent the navigational structure or
    presentation of the Website, to obtain or attempt to obtain any Content through
    any means not purposely made available through the Website.

    I guess they don't like search engines. Then again, perhaps they get forwarded to the page since they're not IE. That's great for a survivable business model.

     

    4. Price
    Soundbuzz and DSE reserve the right, at any time, to change the price and billing methods of the Digital Downloads. For the avoidance of doubt, the prices, promotions, bundles or advertisements posted on the Website by Soundbuzz and DSE is an invitation to treat and shall not in anyway constitute or be interpreted as an offer by Soundbuzz and DSE to you.

    As... long as I get to trick, right? So... prices... shown... aren't... necessarily the real prices? Yes? No?

    9. Non-Wavier
    No delay or failure by Soundbuzz and DSE to take any action under these Terms shall constitute any wavier by Soundbuzz and DSE.

    I'm glad that they won't become wavier, at least they're not having a non-waiver.

    I know, I know, not quite as WTF as their "compatibility" and it's complete lack of mention of Linux -- were I a *nix user I'd be certain to write an angry letter written as a semi-ignorant, rather irate folk -- but Terms of Service and so forth are just so much fun to read as they usually make the site seem even less professional than before.

     
     http://www.google.com/search?q=ripitdownloads <- At least Googe is almost listening.



  • I just love how they couldn't manage to create a direct link...

    ROFLMAO @ MrMan (sorry, Alex, but I like that one :p)

    [quote user="Eggplant"]

    4. Price

    Soundbuzz and DSE reserve the right, at any time, to change the price and billing methods of the Digital Downloads. For the avoidance of doubt, the prices, promotions, bundles or advertisements posted on the Website by Soundbuzz and DSE is an invitation to treat and shall not in anyway constitute or be interpreted as an offer by Soundbuzz and DSE to you.

    As... long as I get to trick, right? So... prices... shown... aren't... necessarily the real prices? Yes? No?[/quote]

    Meh, fairly standard contract law. Legally*, prices on the shelves in a supermarket are an invitation to treat, not an offer. They're not actually obliged to actually sell to you at those prices. The offer is made by you, when you take the items up to the checkout and offer to purchase these items at the suggested price.

    This is in Australian law, at least. I'm not familiar with contract law in other countries.

     

     

     *: I am not a lawyer, and this should not be taken as legal advice.
     



  • [quote user="iwpg"]

    [quote user="MrMan"]Place your iPod on a hard, flat surface.[/quote]

    You mean a wooden table, right? 

    [/quote]

     Don't forget to take a photo.

     

    (I so saw that one coming) 



  • In the UK (or, I should say, England and Wales), retailers aren't obliged to sell to you AT ALL. If, however, they display prices that aren't what they're selling at, it's false advertising.

    The problem would appear to be that their TOS make ANY price shown an 'invitation to treat', seemingly including those displayed at the 'checkout'. IANAL but I get the feeling they've rendered it impossible to make a contract through their website. It likely depends on the definition of 'website', specifically where one ends and another begins.



  • [quote user="Eggplant"]

    I know, I know, not quite as WTF as their "compatibility" and it's complete lack of mention of Linux -- were I a *nix user I'd be certain to write an angry letter written as a semi-ignorant, rather irate folk

    [/quote]

    I don't think any Linux user cares to much about whether or not a site that offers DRM-ridden music downloads supports Linux.



  • [quote user="Jivlain"]

    I just love how they couldn't manage to create a direct link...

    ROFLMAO @ MrMan (sorry, Alex, but I like that one :p)

    [quote user="Eggplant"]

    4. Price

    Soundbuzz and DSE reserve the right, at any time, to change the price and billing methods of the Digital Downloads. For the avoidance of doubt, the prices, promotions, bundles or advertisements posted on the Website by Soundbuzz and DSE is an invitation to treat and shall not in anyway constitute or be interpreted as an offer by Soundbuzz and DSE to you.

    As... long as I get to trick, right? So... prices... shown... aren't... necessarily the real prices? Yes? No?[/quote]

    Meh, fairly standard contract law. Legally*, prices on the shelves in a supermarket are an invitation to treat, not an offer. They're not actually obliged to actually sell to you at those prices. The offer is made by you, when you take the items up to the checkout and offer to purchase these items at the suggested price.

    This is in Australian law, at least. I'm not familiar with contract law in other countries.

     

     

     *: I am not a lawyer, and this should not be taken as legal advice.
     

    [/quote]

     


    this is very country-specific. here in the netherlands, the price labelled is the price they have to sell it for (even if it was mispriced), and they can't refuse the sale (unless it's totally obvious, like a EUR500 product priced for EUR5).



  • [quote user="Anakha"]this is very country-specific. here in the netherlands, the price labelled is the price they have to sell it for (even if it was mispriced), and they can't refuse the sale (unless it's totally obvious, like a EUR500 product priced for EUR5).[/quote]

    That could be something other than contract law, though. False advertising, for example.



  • [quote user="Jivlain"]

    [quote user="Anakha"]this is very country-specific. here in the netherlands, the price labelled is the price they have to sell it for (even if it was mispriced), and they can't refuse the sale (unless it's totally obvious, like a EUR500 product priced for EUR5).[/quote]

    That could be something other than contract law, though. False advertising, for example.

    [/quote]

    It's the same in Sweden, and I imagine that there are similar laws in most of Europe.

    Perhaps this is not strictly contract law in the sense that a price tag itself is regarded as an offer, but the effect is the same. The seller is obligated to offer the merchandise at the labeled price.

    I don't think that it's false advertising either. That would be punished by a fine, not by forcing you to make the false advertisment true.



  • [quote user="Eggplant"]

    3.2 You may not use any "deep-link", "page-scrape", "robot", "spider" or other
    automatic device, program, algorithm or methodology, or any similar or
    equivalent manual process, to access, acquire, copy or monitor any portion of
    the Website, or in any way reproduce or circumvent the navigational structure or
    presentation of the Website, to obtain or attempt to obtain any Content through
    any means not purposely made available through the Website.

    I guess they don't like search engines. Then again, perhaps they get forwarded to the page since they're not IE. That's great for a survivable business model.

    [/quote]

    If by "Content" they mean the music, then maybe it only doesn't allow you to access/acquire/copy/monitor/reproduce/circumvent in order to obtain the Content. If so its merely a horribly worded sentence.



  • [quote user="Talchas"]

    If by "Content" they mean the music, then maybe it only doesn't allow you to access/acquire/copy/monitor/reproduce/circumvent in order to obtain the Content. If so its merely a horribly worded sentence.

    [/quote]

    I wouldn't be too sure - I once worked on a website that explicitly disallowed caching of any of its contents in the T&Cs.



  • It's hard to believe this is real.



  • [quote user="Cloaked User"]

    I wouldn't be too sure - I once worked on a website that explicitly disallowed caching of any of its contents in the T&Cs.

    [/quote]

    So they sued Microsoft, Mozilla, and every person who ever visited their website?

    Thank goodness a waiver/license/list of terms/contract can't always be upheld.  We could make an entire website out of the WTFs in license agreements alone!
     


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