Visual Studio...



  • I've been meaning to learn C# after putting it off for years. I'm quite fluent in Java, which means I should be able to pick it up rather easily. I've been having no issues with the language and I often find it better than Java for a lot of things (not so for others, but that's why it's called C# and not Better Java). But I just stumbled into... quite something in terms of the IDE.

    I'm not a Java IDE apologist by any means. I'm forced to use NetBeans for work, which I find not really optimal and has a lot of weird quirks. It's not bad by any means, just as Eclipse isn't really that bad and has its own set of quirks. I very much prefer Eclipse to do Java development, but NetBeans is okay anyways.

    But I've been digging into Visual Studio (specifically 2013 Community Edition) and boy, for all the convenient stuff it has in terms of templates for project generation, I'm amazed it doesn't pack such a basic feature as a hotkey for expanding the suggestion tool and complete a menial task such as importing a class.

    I googled a bit on the matter just to prove I'm not the WTF here, and I was pointed to ReSharper, which is a plugin that costs TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY US DOLLARS. What?!

    Please tell me I'm TRWTF because I'm having trouble understanding how people work with this IDE day to day without a feature like that. It would drive me absolutely insane if I had to reach for the mouse whenever I want the linter to stop throwing up errors and tell the IDE that yes, I do want to import that class that is very much within my project, and yes, I do want to import that standard library, thank you very much.

    I know this sounds like a rant but it's not really that bad, I just find it amazing because Visual Studio in and of itself is a pretty impressive tool. The fact that it lacks such a basic feature seems incredible.



  • @dstopia said:

    such a basic feature as a hotkey for expanding suggest

    I don't know what that means...

    You mean inserting an auto-complete suggestion? You can tab to it and hit enter.

    @dstopia said:

    and complete a menial task such as importing a class.

    Right-click the class and pick "Resolve" from the contextual menu. I assume there's a keyboard shortcut for this, but it's not something I do often enough to really care to memorize.

    @dstopia said:

    I googled a bit on the matter just to prove I'm not the WTF here, and I was pointed to ReSharper, which is a plugin that costs TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY US DOLLARS. What?!

    ReSharper is stupid trash.

    @dstopia said:

    I'm having trouble understanding how people work with this IDE day to day without a feature like that.

    Like what?

    Even if you just want to hit the contextual menu, you can do that from the keyboard just like any other contextual menu. Hit your context menu key, then "s" activates Resolve.

    I saw a post on Stack Overflow that says control-period does it, I dunno.

    Personally the whole idea of references is stupid IMO. Visual Studio knows which ones it needs, it should just fucking DO it. So I kind of agree with you.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    You mean inserting an auto-complete suggestion? You can tab to it and hit enter.

    Not quite, I mean when you declare an instance of a new class you just created and the IDE can't get the reference because it's in another namespace.

    @blakeyrat said:

    I saw a post on Stack Overflow that says control-period does it, I dunno.

    I saw the same post, Control-period does nothing to me. On NetBeans and Eclipse I should be able to do Control-Space, bring up the context menu and select the option I want with arrow keys + space (I think that's the hotkey for Eclipse, haven't used it in a while...). I do it all the time in my day to day development.



  • Well, again, it's in the contextual menu, and you can do all those functions from the keyboard, so I don't see how that's any worse than NetBeans. Except Windows has a single key for bringing up the contextual menu and you don't need to use control-space.



  • Hmm, maybe I'm not getting my point across. Here's what I see:

    State is a class in another namespace within my project (though that doesn't really matter, Eclipse and NetBeans attempt to resolve the name you typed to all the libraries your project links to). On Eclipse and NetBeans, I should be able to import the class by pressing Ctrl+Space, which brings up the equivalent to this menu:

    which allows me to autogenerate the import. I haven't found a way to automatically access this menu from a hotkey in VS at all.

    Keep in mind that Ctrl+Space works in both Netbeans and Eclipse from any point of the line no matter the state the line of code is in, in general.

    I know it's a silly complaint, but it's pissed me off a little while trying C# out and what I'm truly wondering is if what I'm doing is completely wrong.



  • Addendum, it seems like Ctrl+period works, but ONLY if the caret is on the class (which brings up the smallish blue underline).

    I don't know if my complaint is truly warranted, but I found it easier in Java IDEs, I guess. Disregard, I suck cocks etc.



  • Sigh.

    Do you have a key on your keyboard that looks like this:

    Pressing that key will bring up the contextual menu, as if you had right-clicked where the insertion point is.

    Once the contextual menu is open, you can either use its shortcuts, or navigate around it with the arrow keys, just like you did in NetBeans.

    This is a standard feature of the OS you're using and has been for, what, 20 solid years now. FYI.

    @dstopia said:

    I don't know if my complaint is truly warranted, but I found it easier in Java IDEs,

    The feature you're using to do this in Java IDEs is, as far as I can tell, a complete rip-off of that standard 20-year-old Windows feature. Except it requires a chord to activate.

    In any case, if you go back to that StackOverflow post, it has the name of the "action". Knowing that, you can set up whatever keyboard shortcut you want. Knock yourself out.



  • Put the cursor in the object class name that defines the variable and press Control + .. If the class is defined in the resources, press enter to do the using insert. Works fine for me in VS2013.

    e.g.: for

    Class instance = new Class();
    

    put the cursor in the first Class token.



  • @dstopia said:

    State is a class in another namespace within my project (though that doesn't really matter, Eclipse and NetBeans attempt to resolve the name you typed to all the libraries your project links to).

    Visual Studio Intellisense mostly works the same way the compiler works. If the compiler can't see that class, neither can Intellisense. Did you include the other namespace with a using statement?



  • @NedFodder said:

    Did you include the other namespace with a using statement?

    Unless I'm the WTF here, the exact feature he's talking about is the one that automatically inserts using statements as-needed.

    And, again, VS is smart enough to know exactly what using statements you need. The compiler's smart enough to only actually build the ones you actually use. It's just too dumb to JUST FUCKING DO IT without bothering you. Very annoying.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Unless I'm the WTF here, the exact feature he's talking about is the one that automatically inserts using statements as-needed.

    And, again, VS is smart enough to know exactly what using statements you need. The compiler's smart enough to only actually build the ones you actually use. It's just too dumb to JUST FUCKING DO IT without bothering you. Very annoying.

    Actually VS is only smart enough TO A DEGREE. If you suddenly need a Point class and two of the system library namespaces just so happen to have one, and it just happens both derive from a parent class thats the actual argument type for a method. Good luck.



  • When it can't tell the difference, THAT'S when it asks.

    Until then, it should just FUCKING DO EEEET.

    Honestly the language should do away with standard using statements anyway, unless (as pointed out) there are conflicting class names. Make them all optional. Why the fuck not? The IDE gets it, the compiler gets it. Why waste our time?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    When it can't tell the difference, THAT'S when it asks.

    Until then, it should just FUCKING DO EEEET.

    Then you upgrade to .NET 5 and suddenly it doesn't work and people bitch and whine because Microsoft reused a class name. Explicitly is there for a reason. Why even bother having namespaces at that point otherwise.



  • Oh come on. If you upgrade the project and now there's a new naming conflict THE IDE IS SMART ENOUGH TO FIGURE THAT OUT AND PROMPT. Goddamned, I'm a fucking idiot, and I could write that fucking code.

    "Deeeeerp we shouldn't do this really easy and obvious usability improvement because what if we suddenly become retarded retards during the next version and make it all broken-like deeeerp!!!"



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Unless I'm the WTF here, the exact feature he's talking about is the one that automatically inserts using statements as-needed.

    I've seriously never heard of that feature. I'm always doing crap like typing File.Ope - WHY THE CRAP WON'T THE IDE AUTOCOMPL - oh, I forgot to say using System.IO;.



  • Don't ask for opinions here. Download vs 2013 pro or ultimate trial, use it for a few days then install resharper. Try it for a week, uninstalled reshaper and try vs for a few more days. Decide what you like.



  • Just don't blame Visual Studio for bloaty-crashiness while ReSharper is installed, because ReSharper is a bloated, crashy bitch.



  • Does ReSharper emulate Linux hardw--

    [gunshot noise]

    [slumps over in chair]


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    I don't even understand Blakey's hatred for it. It really helps. A lot.

    Granted this is coming from an IntelliJ user, so maybe I just like the JetBrains IDE stuff. IntelliJ is pure awesome though.

    ps.ss tab 1, us tab ); ---> preparedStatement.setString(1, username);

    Or

    ul tab .for tab ---> for(User user : userList){ }

    And inb4 usability rant: this all pops up in a nice little discoverable autocomplete thingy. You don't have to type it all by memory...


  • mod

    @NedFodder said:

    I've seriously never heard of that feature. I'm always doing crap like typing File.Ope - WHY THE CRAP WON'T THE IDE AUTOCOMPL - oh, I forgot to say using System.IO;.

    I use it all the time. Saves having to remember the entire class and namespace structure of .NET.



  • I have vim set up to automatically import packages for my Go program before it saves. So if I have a problem with autocomplete, I just type :w and everything works.



  • butterflies... guys.


  • BINNED

    @NedFodder said:

    I've seriously never heard of that feature. I'm always doing crap like typing File.Ope - WHY THE CRAP WON'T THE IDE AUTOCOMPL - oh, I forgot to say using System.IO;.

    I'd rather have that than the shit QtCreator sometimes pulls.

    QDateT, oh, thanks autocomplete, Tab, there we go.

    Compile.

    What do you mean you don't know what QDateTime is? You autocompleted it for me!

    Oh, you didn't add the include. Well, thanks for making me think it's included in whatever headers I already had.

    I can kinda understand why it doesn't do that, it's C++ after all, with all the glory of C-style includes. Maybe it doesn't want to just stick it into my .cpp file and it's not sure which header to put it in. But damn it, you could've asked before I hit a compiler error.



  • I use Resharper for this purpose and wouldn't work without it.

    Yes, it is crashy from time to time, but I think all the benefits still outweigh this.



  • It really bugs me that vanilla VS can't match up references from other projects in my solution - I'd much rather it automatically suggested/added project references to resolve classes where possible.



  • Just saying.

    But also, after Ctrl + .

    Why is this a completely different menu from intellisense, I have no idea.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    I hate ReSharper with a passion.



  • Yeah, the problem I got stuck on is that it doesn't pop the menu unless your caret is on the class you want to include, which is not the way I'm used to and it kinda sucks if I type too fast.

    But yeah, I knew there was something I was doing wrong, though I still prefer the way NetBeans and Eclipse handle it.



  • Did you pay 250 dollars solely for this feature?



  • @dstopia said:

    I googled a bit on the matter just to prove I'm not the WTF here, and I was pointed to ReSharper, which is a plugin that costs TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY US DOLLARS. What?!

    ReSharper is TR :wtf:



  • Regarding $250....lets do some math [I am talking to professional, not hobbiest and using USA numbers]...

    Average LOADED cost of a developer $75K/year. Standard work year 2K hours. Cost/Hour = 37.50. ReSharper costs 6.7 hours over the cost of a year [ assuming you pay full retail]. So with 250 work days per year...that is 1.6 minutes per day!

    Based on multiple studies [similar to Matches suggestion 9 hours ago], and the mean savings is about 20-30 minutes per day.



  • Honestly? I would. But resharper helps flag dead code, code that can be shortened, and common issues. You have to apply your brain, but often it's very helpful to always remind you to work on consistent code style. You can customize it to match what you want.

    Solution wide analysis should only be used if you're not frequently changing branches because the cache will have to rebuild every time you do, but often having a single page analysis makes me happy.

    But i use vs 8 hours at work then 5 hours at home

    And reinforcing the above, those limited import cases save me the time typing anything because 99 percent of the time it pops the right import immediately



  • @dstopia said:

    Yeah, the problem I got stuck on is that it doesn't pop the menu unless your caret is on the class you want to include, which is not the way I'm used to and it kinda sucks if I type too fast.

    It's a contextual menu. The context is the unrecognized class name.

    It sounds to me that Java IDEs simply do not get the concept. The context isn't the line, it's the unrecognized class name. Knowing the general quality of Java GUIs, this does not surprise me.

    @TheCPUWizard said:

    Average LOADED cost of a developer $75K/year. Standard work year 2K hours. Cost/Hour = 37.50. ReSharper costs 6.7 hours over the cost of a year [ assuming you pay full retail]. So with 250 work days per year...that is 1.6 minutes per day!

    It costs 5 minutes a day purely in its unit test runner being 3 times slower than VS's alone. (Grab a watch, time it. It's amazingly slow.)

    Does ReSharper do a couple handy things? Yes.

    When you ask a ReSharper fan what it does, do they rail off an entire litany of features native to VS without ReSharper? Yes. To the point where you're thinking: has this idiot ever even used VS, because it already does all this goddamned stuff? Yes.

    Is VS measurably slower in every way with ReSharper enabled? Oh hell yes. Is it more likely to crash? Damned straight yes.

    The ReSharper equation doesn't add up.

    ... oh and have I mentioned ReSharper's usability is fucking awful? And the shit it draws all over your code editor looks like some 5-year-old got a hold of Excel's drawing tools.


    TRUE RESHARPER STORY:

    At work my boss wants me to use it for some reason. So I was struggling along with it for a few weeks, then suddenly my VS developed this weird quirk: after building a website (but before running it) VS would just sit there, doing absolutely nothing, for about two solid minutes. Just... nothing. No CPU usage, no memory allocations, just sitting there. Huh.

    Being naive and stupid about how badly ReSharper is written, I started diagnosing things. I switched from IIS Express to IIS, no change. I did a repair install of Visual Studio, no change. I deleted every cache I could fine, no change. Eventually I thought of disabled ReSharper, so I did that and... DELAY GONE!

    It was all ReSharper's fault. So make sure you subtract that 3 hours or so from your "20-30 minutes per day" value. (Which is utter fiction in the first place.)



  • @blakeyrat said:

    It's a contextual menu. The context is the unrecognized class name.

    It sounds to me that Java IDEs simply do not get the concept. The context isn't the line, it's the unrecognized class name. Knowing the general quality of Java GUIs, this does not surprise me.

    The error is contextual to the line of code my caret is stepping on. It's simply a matter of extending the context in order to make it more convenient for the developer, not a misunderstanding of the word "context". If there's more than one error in a line, you can tab-cycle through them.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    It sounds to me that Java IDEs simply do not get the concept. The context isn't the line, it's the unrecognized class name. Knowing the general quality of Java GUIs, this does not surprise me.

    No, they know what's going on. They give you suggestions that match and when you pick one that one gets imported and the appropriate autocompletion happens. At least that's what Eclipse does. But knowing you, this does not surprise me.



  • @dstopia said:

    The error is contextual to the line of code my caret is stepping on.

    Maybe in Java it is? Or maybe the feature you're activating with control-space isn't the standard contextual menu, but something else entirely?

    @boomzilla said:

    They give you suggestions that match and when you pick one that one gets imported and the appropriate autocompletion happens.

    That's what happens in VS too. The only difference is in VS, your insertion point has to be in the actual context the import is for. It doesn't "fudge" the context to the entire line.

    Look; maybe I completely misunderstand what's going on here. God knows dstopia seems incapable of using any standard terminology when talking about GUIs. Maybe my assumption that control-space is equivalent to the contextual menu key is wrong.

    I'm just saying: don't get mad at VS for implementing the GUI correctly.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Look; maybe I completely misunderstand what's going on here. God knows dstopia seems incapable of using any standard terminology when talking about GUIs. Maybe my assumption that control-space is equivalent to the contextual menu key is wrong.

    Maybe I am, I don't know. I just know that if I type the name of a class that's not imported in a Java IDE, I don't have to go back to the class name to import it or go grab my mouse if I typed the entire line out. I don't know if that's doing it right or wrong, I just find it far more convenient. If that's doing it wrong, well, whatever, I prefer it the wrong way.



  • At work I switch between Eclipse and VS, and the biggest things I miss from Eclipse are:

    • expanding abbreviated names: I can type heWS, hit ctrl+space and it'll expand to helloWorldService or popup a menu if it's ambiguous.
    • quick fix: Ctrl+1 will auto-complete and auto-fix almost anything. By combining these two things I can do
      • heWS ctrl+space :point_right: helloWorldService
      • .gHW ctrl+space :point_right: .getHelloWorld()
      • ctrl+1 :point_right: String helloWorld = helloWorldService.getHelloWorld();


  • @blakeyrat said:

    That's what happens in VS too. The only difference is in VS, your insertion point has to be in the actual context the import is for. It doesn't "fudge" the context to the entire line.

    I'm confused. This happens while I'm typing. I'm not sure how that is "the entire line" and not the context that the import is for.

    @blakeyrat said:

    Maybe my assumption that control-space is equivalent to the contextual menu key is wrong.

    Dunno. Ctrl+Space brings up an autocomplete menu. When I do the menu key in Eclipse, it's just like right clicking, which is a different menu than the autocomplete.

    EDIT: Oh, and you can do the autocomplete if you've already typed stuff out, it just means that there's nothing there to autocomplete except for the missing import.



  • Is this Ctrl-period shortcut a new feature in VS2013? It does zilch in VS2012 best I can tell (then again, it may also be only functional for .NET code...)


  • sockdevs

    @hungrier said:

    expanding abbreviated names: I can type heWS, hit ctrl+space and it'll expand to helloWorldService or popup a menu if it's ambiguous.

    VS IntelliSense has that ability too, at least in 2013; may have been in 2012 too, I can't recall.

    Edit: In fact, you don't even need ctrl+space half the time; the autocomplete appears anyway.



  • If it's in 2012, I haven't found how to do it.



  • or



  • @boomzilla said:

    I'm confused.

    Again: maybe I am too.

    @boomzilla said:

    This happens while I'm typing.

    In which IDE?

    @boomzilla said:

    I'm not sure how that is "the entire line" and not the context that the import is for.

    According to dstopia, he can type the entire line of code, then hit his equivalent to the contextual menu key, and it gives him a list of all the errors in that line of code. Which is fine I guess, because he's too lazy to hit control-left arrow a couple times to get back to the underlined keyword.

    In C#, though, a "line" isn't really a unit at all. A line could be 5 C# statements, or one-fifth of one. (I thought this was true of Java also, but it's been ages since I used it.) So it doesn't make sense to attach contextual menu items to a "line of code", since "a line of code" has no contextual meaning.

    Individual class names do, however.

    @boomzilla said:

    Dunno. Ctrl+Space brings up an autocomplete menu.

    But we're not talking about auto-complete, we're talking about filling-in the using statements to match the code you've typed. Auto-complete happens while you're typing, filling-in the using statements can only happen once you've finished typing the class name.


    Anyway, this conversation's dumb because the feature's dumb. The real solution to this problem is to just have the IDE fucking doooo eeeet. That's what needs to be fixed here. There's no reason to ever show the user using statements unless there's a naming conflict between two references.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    It costs 5 minutes a day purely in its unit test runner being 3 times slower than VS's alone. (Grab a watch, time it. It's amazingly slow.)

    Yes, it is slower to actually execute. The overall impact varies depending on exactly what you want to run (compare to the time to setup a VS PlayList). It all depends on what you want to do, in many cases I use an extension to run tests OUTSIDE VS and then import the results so there is zero impact.

    Does ReSharper do a couple handy things? Yes.
    "couple" is vague. In many jurisdictions it is limited to 2...I believe the number to be significantly higher than that.
    When you ask a ReSharper fan what it does, do they rail off an entire litany of features native to VS without ReSharper? Yes. To the point where you're thinking: has this idiot ever even used VS, because it already does all this goddamned stuff? Yes.
    I agree. A big part is discoverability (which is a positive point from the ReSharper UX perspective)
    Is VS measurably slower in every way with ReSharper enabled? Oh hell yes. Is it more likely to crash? Damned straight yes.
    I have only seen this on (what I consider to be) underpowered machines [and also depending on what is meant by measurability - I would not count attaching a profiler and measuring sub-millisecond differences important, even though it fits the definition of measurable] In older versions (a few years ago at least), there were come crashing issues. I have not had ANY with ReSharper 8 (or 9).
    The ReSharper equation doesn't add up.
    Perhaps not for you, but for many it does.
    ... oh and have I mentioned ReSharper's usability is fucking awful? And the shit it draws all over your code editor looks like some 5-year-old got a hold of Excel's drawing tools.
    Examples would be good. Considering the amount of information that is placed in various areas by VS itself (especially 2015 and/or ultimate editions) I have not found it significant. Additionally I can look at a full size screen and grok many things in under a second.

  • sockdevs

    @blakeyrat said:

    There's no reason to ever show the user using statements unless there's a naming conflict between two references.

    Doesn't that same menu also offer to create a skeleton class for you?



  • @TheCPUWizard said:

    "couple" is vague. In many jurisdictions it is limited to 2...

    What are you talking about? Jurisdictions?

    "Couple" is vague, yes, I intended to use a vague word. DOES THAT BOTHER YOUR BRAIN? Good.

    @TheCPUWizard said:

    I agree. A big part is discoverability (which is a positive point from the ReSharper UX perspective)

    The ReSharper UX is utter trash. Seriously?

    "A big part is discovery." A big part of what? You agree with my point that ReSharper does nothing but "re-brand" existing features and take credit for them, then you seemingly somehow in some way use that as an argument for ReSharper? Wha?

    @TheCPUWizard said:

    I have only seen this on (what I consider to be) underpowered machines [and also depending on what is meant by measurability - I would not count attaching a profiler and measuring sub-millisecond differences important, even though it fits the definition of measurable]

    My ass.

    The first time you pop-up a contextual menu with ReSharper installed takes SEVERAL SECONDS of chugging. FOR A CONTEXTUAL MENU.

    I will admit I'm using it at work where I have an i5 laptop with a hybrid drive, and if left to my own devices I'd never write code on a laptop, or any computer without a SSD. BUT GUESS WHAT I don't get a choice in what hardware I get served at work, and so trust me when I say: for me, ReSharper is SIGNIFICANTLY slower than native VS. Not just with running tests, not just with popping up contextual menus, but everything. Loading files, re-loading projects when source control changes them, everything is slower.

    @TheCPUWizard said:

    In older versions (a few years ago at least), there were come crashing issues. I have not had ANY with ReSharper 8 (or 9).

    Well I have. Hi.

    @TheCPUWizard said:

    Perhaps not for you, but for many it does.

    I think people buy it out of knee-jerk habit.

    I think the product at some point in history was actually beneficial.

    I think if people who bought ReSharper out of knee-jerk habit stopped using it for 3-6 months and actually learned normal Visual Studio, they would no longer feel the need to knee-jerk anymore.

    @TheCPUWizard said:

    Additionally I can look at a full size screen and grok many things in under a second.

    You can't trust the opinion of anybody who uses the word "grok". ARGUMENT: BLAKEYRAT.

    @RaceProUK said:

    Doesn't that same menu also offer to create a skeleton class for you?

    Well yes, but that's not the feature anybody's been talking about in this entire long thread.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    According to dstopia, he can type the entire line of code, then hit his equivalent to the contextual menu key, and it gives him a list of all the errors in that line of code. Which is fine I guess, because he's too lazy to hit control-left arrow a couple times to get back to the underlined keyword.

    Hmm...I guess I've never done that, but trying in Eclipse, Ctrl+. highlights the error. Actually, it cycles through errors, even on different lines. I've never done that before. It also has the error thing in the gutter, which you can click and get a list of suggested remediations.

    @blakeyrat said:

    In C#, though, a "line" isn't really a unit at all. A line could be 5 C# statements, or one-fifth of one. (I thought this was true of Java also, but it's been ages since I used it.) So it doesn't make sense to attach contextual menu items to a "line of code", since "a line of code" has no contextual meaning.

    Yes, there's no special meaning to lines in Java. Just like any other C-like language.

    @blakeyrat said:

    But we're not talking about auto-complete, we're talking about filling-in the using statements to match the code you've typed. Auto-complete happens while you're typing, filling-in the using statements can only happen once you've finished typing the class name.

    Eh...OK, I'm not completely clear on what using does. Looks similar to C++...it doesn't actually add any new stuff into your...um...local context, it just makes it so you don't type the namespace. There's no equivalent thing in Java.

    tl;dr; I was thinking about a slightly different problem.



  • Meh, don't worry about it. The problem here is 99% one of communication, I'm pretty sure.

    And in any case, I'm sure as fuck not going to download Java and try it out.



  • @boomzilla said:

    Eh...OK, I'm not completely clear on what using does. Looks similar to C++...it doesn't actually add any new stuff into your...um...local context, it just makes it so you don't type the namespace. There's no equivalent thing in Java.

    I'm not sure because I'm not familiar enough with C# but I just see it as an equivalent of import.

    @blakeyrat said:

    Meh, don't worry about it. The problem here is 99% one of communication, I'm pretty sure.

    Maybe. A line isn't a special unit in Java either, it is however a way to organize your work as a developer and as such I'm guessing Eclipse and NetBeans do well-mannered guesses as to how your work is organized. Maybe there's a weird coding standard where that guess fucks up, but I haven't found it.

    I do agree that "just fucking do it" is the correct choice.


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