Minor units of volume WTF



  • Okay, so we all (well, quite a few of us) know that pints are the right size in the UK and some weird stingy short measurement in the US. (A UK pint is 20 fl oz, a US one is 16.) But that's not the WTF. The WTF is that in the UK one pint (20 fl oz) is 568 ml, but in the US (according to the labels on bottles), 20 fl oz is 591 ml.

    So water is a different density over here?
     



  •  The only things that are a different density over here are the politicians.

    And, if you look here: http://www.metas.ch/en/scales/systemus.html, you'll note that a UK fluid oz is not the same as a US fluid oz. Apparently, we super-size everything.



  • TRWTF, of course, is the continued use of imperial measurements by the US. Are they not the only ones who still use it still?

    As no one else uses it, I guess they are free to make them whatever they like!

    On a not unrelated matter, I think that we here in Australia should make our own measurement system. As it seems that every area of water is measured in numbers of Sydney Harbours it could fill(or could fill it), we have the obvious measurement for fluid volume.

     Anyone want to by me a picoSydHarb of beer?
     



  • No, the UK still uses pints for beer and the like in pubs, and for milk (sometimes).

    Thanks for the comprehensive guide. The US is even more WTFy than I thought. Is ice cream in dry or wet pints? What about something like goose fat (after Christmas!) which is liquid in a warm room but solid in the fridge? Having two units of volume called the same thing, but different sizes, has WTF written all over it.
     



  • Apparently we're one of not many countries that tend to have pints of beer, which is quite a large drink. Though it is only draught beer and cider that are sold in pints, everything else has to be sold in metric units, but that doesn't stop dairies, for example, selling '568 ml - 1 pint' of milk. But draught beer has to be sold in pints or half-pints by law, though a 'pint' (or half) is allowed to be up to 10% short, and with pint-to-rim glasses, the head means it can be. And yards of ale, 3 pints, are fine to sell.



  • [quote user="m0ffx"]Apparently we're one of not many countries that tend to have pints of beer, which is quite a large drink. < snip >
    [/quote]

    No it isn't. Beer was sold in quarts in the past. That's quite large...

    Mmmm... Beer...

     



  • The real WTF is not using metric.



  • The real WTF is metric. I mean, a measurement system that's logical and easy to understand?

     What's wrong with a system that's based on the length of your foot, or how far an army can march in a day, or how much a man can lift before he collapses?

    Yours,

    Pint-drinker :) 



  • [quote user="Joe Luser"]

    [quote user="m0ffx"]Apparently we're one of
    not many countries that tend to have pints of beer, which is quite a
    large drink. < snip >
    [/quote]

    No it isn't. Beer was sold in quarts in the past. That's quite large...

    [/quote]

    The real WTF is that you guys have never heard of a stein!

     And
    I was in a bar in Valladolid with some friends last summer and they had
    double-steins.  None of  us wanted more than one!

     



  • You realize it's not really that easy to just up and change an entire countries measurement system. Believe it or not, Metric is taught in our schools and just about everything on the store shelves is labeled in both. America is switching over, just very slowly.



  • @Isuwen said:

    America is switching over, just very slowly.

    Australia is still switching too... Just ask anyone older than about 45 like my mum. She'll tell you how to convert measurement's of Km into Miles, and the speed you are travelling at to mph, then how to calculate the time left in a jouney based on that (the long version of just calculating the time in km/hr).



  • [quote user="Joe Luser"]

    [quote user="m0ffx"]Apparently we're one of not many countries that tend to have pints of beer, which is quite a large drink. < snip >
    [/quote]

    No it isn't. Beer was sold in quarts in the past. That's quite large...

    Mmmm... Beer...

     [/quote]

    Yeah.  I was a bartender in college -- we used 16 oz pint glasses as small beers and 24 oz glasses for large.  In my experience, pints are the smallest size draughts available in most bars (in the US). Unless you go to a smaller old-man-type dive that sells 10 oz glasses for < $1.00.

     



  • [quote user="Bob Janova"]

    No, the UK still uses pints for beer and the like in pubs, and for milk (sometimes).

    Thanks for the comprehensive guide. The US is even more WTFy than I thought. Is ice cream in dry or wet pints? What about something like goose fat (after Christmas!) which is liquid in a warm room but solid in the fridge? Having two units of volume called the same thing, but different sizes, has WTF written all over it.

    [/quote]

    I believe ice cream is sold by the 'nominal pint': it says "one pint", but the actual amount sold is measured in ounces.  Goose fat is measured by the liquid pint, or by the ounce.  Dry pints are not used very often, and are only for pourable solids like wheat or rice.



  • We (in America) also have three different weight systems, depending on what you are weighing:  avoirdupois (for food and most other things), apothecaries' weight (for drugs) and troy weight (for precious metals).  (And others like carat weight for diamonds.)

    Which weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of gold?  A pound of feathers at 454 grams.  A pound of gold is 12 troy ounces, 373 grams.

     Which weighs more, an ounce of feathers or an ounce of gold?  The troy ounce of gold weighs more than the avoirdupois ounce of feathers.

     



  • American distilleries (spirits manufacturers) switched over to metric measurements for some sizes when they discovered that they could replace the traditional "fifth" (one-fifth of a gallon; four-fifths of a quart) with a 750-ml size and sell it at the same price.

    They still sell a (U.S.) quart size, because a liter size would be bigger.



  • [quote user="newfweiler"]

    We (in America) also have three different weight systems, depending on what you are weighing:  avoirdupois (for food and most other things), apothecaries' weight (for drugs) and troy weight (for precious metals).  (And others like carat weight for diamonds.)

    [/quote]

    I've never seen apothecaries' weight used.  Medicines sold by weight are [i]always[/i] measured by milligrams of active ingredient.  Medicines sold by volume are [i]always[/i] sold by multiples of the dose size, which is measured in fractional tablespoons or fractional teaspoons.  Bulk sales of liquid medicines are [i]always[/i] in metric.



  • [quote user="Isuwen"] America is switching over, just very slowly.
    [/quote]

     Just ask NASA!



  • [quote user="Carnildo"][quote user="newfweiler"]

    We (in America) also have three different weight systems, depending on what you are weighing:  avoirdupois (for food and most other things), apothecaries' weight (for drugs) and troy weight (for precious metals).  (And others like carat weight for diamonds.)

    [/quote]

    I've never seen apothecaries' weight used.  Medicines sold by weight are [i]always[/i] measured by milligrams of active ingredient.  Medicines sold by volume are [i]always[/i] sold by multiples of the dose size, which is measured in fractional tablespoons or fractional teaspoons.  Bulk sales of liquid medicines are [i]always[/i] in metric.

    [/quote]

    You've never taken a 5 grain tablet of aspirin?  Or a 1-1/4 grain tablet of St. Joseph's Aspirin for Children?  Take a look on your aspirin bottle -- I've got one right here ...  hmmm ... you're right, they've changed.  5 grains is now 325 mg.  OK, I guess I'm old.

    I wonder when they'll start selling diamonds by the milligram.

     

     


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