Your never to old



  • Fun lovin grannies - tis not granny porn btw :¬)



  • Description is just great:

     <font size="2">Both were wearing knee-length skirts, white shirts or
    blouses and carrying shoulder bags. Both are described as having grey
    hair.</font>

     Now it should be really easy to find elderly women like that :D



  • Heh. What next? Vicious gangs of Keep Left signs?

    I'm probably ascribing too much intelligence to a pair of lowly bag-snatchers, but maybe they're men disguised as old ladies. The one on the left looks particularly mannish. Wouldn't be a bad idea if you plan to commit crimes in an area with heavy video surveillance.

    --RA



  • "Your never to old" to learn the difference between "your" and "you're"



  • [quote user="pinkduck"]"Your never to old" to learn the difference between "your" and "you're"[/quote]

    Not to mention "to" and "too". 



  • huh, I never noticed the difference between "your" and "you're" but now you've pointed it out it's quite obvious, cool :¬)  I never understood the difference between "to" and "too" besides the number of "o"s :¬)  could you explain that one?



  • [quote user="Tann San"]huh, I never noticed the difference between "your" and "you're" but now you've pointed it out it's quite obvious, cool :¬)  I never understood the difference between "to" and "too" besides the number of "o"s :¬)  could you explain that one?[/quote]

    Oh, my. English is packed with words that sound the same but have entirely different meanings.

    to: http://www.yourdictionary.com/ahd/t/t0242200.html

    too: http://www.yourdictionary.com/ahd/t/t0265900.html

    So, it's too late to go to the store, so we need to order it online and request its shipping to us be next-day too.

    Don't even ask about "its" versus "it's." Half of native English speakers can't keep that one straight.

    --RA

    "He crushed the mug with his bear hands"



  • [quote user="Rank Amateur"]

    Don't even ask about "its" versus "it's." Half of native English speakers can't keep that one straight.

    [/quote]

    I don't believe you! Your joking. I'm not native English speaker, and its obvious too me.
    <font color="white">sarcasm tags needed?</font>



  • [quote user="viraptor"][quote user="Rank Amateur"]

    Don't even ask about "its" versus "it's." Half of native English speakers can't keep that one straight.

    [/quote]

    I don't believe you! Your joking. I'm not native English speaker, and its obvious too me.
    <font color="white">sarcasm tags needed?</font>

    [/quote]

     

    well played. 



  • I always had trouble with "its vs it's".
    But i recently came up with a rule that i can remember.

    Its -- should be used like "his", ie you don't say: "what is hi's name?" you say "what is his name?"
    It's -- this is the other one. or in other words it's is used when you can break it apart into "it is".

    I guess it seems obvious in retrospect. The key is just to remember one, and the other just falls into place.



  • [quote user="viraptor"][quote user="Rank Amateur"]

    Don't even ask about "its" versus "it's." Half of native English speakers can't keep that one straight.

    [/quote]

    I don't believe you! Your joking. I'm not native English speaker, and its obvious too me.
    <font color="#ffffff">sarcasm tags needed?</font>

    [/quote]

    You mean your "knot" native, don't ewe?



  • WTF.  Is Big Brother in London, now?



  • [quote user="Anonononymous"][quote user="viraptor"][quote user="Rank Amateur"]

    Don't even ask about "its" versus "it's." Half of native English speakers can't keep that one straight.

    [/quote]

    I don't believe you! Your joking. I'm not native English speaker, and its obvious too me.
    <font color="#ffffff">sarcasm tags needed?</font>

    [/quote]

    You mean your "knot" native, don't ewe?
    [/quote]

    No, I'm a frayed knot.



  • [quote user="jimlangrunner"]WTF.  Is Big Brother in London, now?
    [/quote]


    Haven't you been paying attention?  Sometime in the past decade or two, the British government collectively decided that [i]1984[/i] was a great plan for the future.



  • [quote user="mlathe"]

    I always had trouble with "its vs it's".
    But i recently came up with a rule that i can remember.

    Its -- should be used like "his", ie you don't say: "what is hi's name?" you say "what is his name?"
    It's -- this is the other one. or in other words it's is used when you can break it apart into "it is".

    I guess it seems obvious in retrospect. The key is just to remember one, and the other just falls into place.

    [/quote]

     
    I had problems with its vs. it's as well, before being subjected to Bob the Angry Flower:

     



  • I always got the "it's" thing, I can't think of any examples where you would use "its", anyone?



  • [quote user="Tann San"]I always got the "it's" thing, I can't think
    of any examples where you would use "its", anyone?[/quote]The cat broke
    its leg? "its" is a possessive pornoun, it indicates the property of
    something that is.. ehm.. I'm sorry,English is not my native language
    so I don't know the word for it. Somethinghas no gender? In Dutch the
    noun is called "onzijdig". For the possessive ponoun, we don't have
    this distinction, so we usually use "his" ("zijn"). A door has no
    gender, but can have property: a knob for instance. You know that door?
    Its knob is missing.

    Same with they're, their, there and possibly some more.

    they're: they are -> Pronoun + verb 

    their: possessive pronoun

    there: location 

     I'm not a grammar-nazi, especially in English
    (as I have to search a bit to find what a "zelfstandig naamwoord"
    (noun), "bijvoegelijk naamwoord" (adjective), "werkwoord" (verb),
    "persoonlijk voornaamwoord" (he/she/it, pronoun) is in English, and
    even now I'm not 100% certain ;) ),but really, all those "difficult
    words", or rather, the distinction between them, is very eas once you
    understand what they really are :)

     

    Oh, my. English is packed with words that sound the same but have entirely different meanings.

    My
    English teacher had an anecdote about that, he had a visitor and she
    wanted to go to a movie. "Okay, but I rather not see Annie" (
    http://imdb.com/title/tt0083564/ ), but she understood: "Okay, but I
    rather not see any..."



  • wow, thanks now I've learnt even more :¬)  I didn't even know about "they're", I just always used either "they are" or "their" depending on the context.  I used "you're" for the first time yesterday in a forum I regularly post at, had a big cheesy grin as I posted hehe.



  • Actually it can be correct to say "The cat hurt It's leg", assuming that there is an object or person called "It" :)

     

    That
    out of the way, apart from non-native English speakers, I never really
    understood why so many people have such a problem with such basic
    concepts.

     Should I ever end up in the position of hiring
    people, a subtle part of the testing process will involve seeing if
    they know when to use "there/their, too/to/two, its/it's, your/you're,
    right/write",general bad grammar, and similar. Bad English just really
    grates on my nerves. It's almost literally trying to translate a
    foreign language and English mixed together on an almost word for word basis. It hurts. 

    Yew mite, joust has Whale torque, Inn rushing whine Your rite, two me!



  • [quote user="Carnildo"][quote user="jimlangrunner"]WTF.  Is Big Brother in London, now?
    [/quote]


    Haven't you been paying attention?  Sometime in the past decade or two, the British government collectively decided that [i]1984[/i] was a great plan for the future.

    [/quote]

    Indeed, and a recent report puts the UK as the worst non-totalitarian nation in the world for privacy/surveillance:

    (Of course, the US is right behind it, and trying to catch up fast.)


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