Xauth utility



  • "exit" and "quit" commands do different things.

    xauth> help
        add dpyname protoname hexkey   add entry
        exit                           save changes and exit program
        extract filename dpyname...    extract entries into file
        help [topic]                   print help
        info                           print information about entries
        list [dpyname...]              list entries
        merge filename...              merge entries from files
        nextract filename dpyname...   numerically extract entries
        nlist [dpyname...]             numerically list entries
        nmerge filename...             numerically merge entries
        quit                           abort changes and exit program
        remove dpyname...              remove entries
        source filename                read commands from file
        ?                              list available commands
        generate dpyname protoname [options]  use server to generate entry
        options are:
          timeout n    authorization expiration time in seconds
          trusted      clients using this entry are trusted
          untrusted    clients using this entry are untrusted
          group n      clients using this entry belong to application group n
          data hexkey  auth protocol specific data needed to generate the entry
    
    xauth>


  • That behavior is absolutely and completely normal - basically it should be the expected default behavior and has been since the dawn of computing time.

    :rankled:



  • $ microcom 
    connected to /dev/ttyS0
    Escape character: Ctrl-\
    Type the escape character followed by c to get to the menu or q to quit
    
    Enter command. Try 'help' for a list of builtin commands
    -> help
    speed - set terminal speed
    exit - exit from command processing
    flow - set flow control
    break - send break
    quit - quit microcom
    help - show help
    x - execute a script
    # - comment
    md - Display memory (i.MX specific)
    mw - write memory (i.MX specific)
    mwb - write memory byte (i.MX specific)
    mwh - write memory 2 byte (i.MX specific)
    upload - upload image (i.MX specific)
    connect - sync communication to Processor (i.MX specific)
    sniff - sniff and dissect communication from ATK (i.MX specific)
    -> 
    
    

    Here quit is the most destructive option...



  • :x
    vs.

    :q!
    

    or am I missing something?



  • @NedFodder said:

    or am I missing something?

    :q
    Quit.

    :q!
    Quit without saving.

    Would need to change above command to "quit!" to be the same.

    Windows: Alt+F4 = Exit
    Mac: Ctrl+Q = Quit



  • "exit" does what you'd expect "quit" to do. "quit" does what you'd expect "exit" to do. ("quit" implies you're stopping on purpose, finished using the program, "exit" implies the program exits suddenly without saving.)

    Sheesh.

    Quick, someone explain to me how awesome the CLI is!


  • BINNED

    Just alias quit to fuckoff and it all makes sense.



  • @dcon said:

    Mac: Ctrl+Q = Quit

    Can’t reproduce …



  • @Gurth said:

    Can’t reproduce …

    Meant cmd+q. Obviously.



  • @Gurth said:

    Can’t reproduce …

    Probably for the best, I heard pedantry is hereditary ;)



  • @Ashley_Sheridan said:

    I heard pedantry is hereditary

    You say this like it's a bad thing.

    Sincerely,
    Hardware Geek
    Viscount Pedantic Dickweed of the Most Noble Order of the Garter
    Knight Pedantic Dickweed of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath
    Pedantic Spellar/Gramming Nazi



  • @Ashley_Sheridan said:

    I heard pedantry is hereditary

    Well, that’s this forum dead within a generation, then.



  • @NedFodder said:

    :x vs. :q! or am I missing something?

    I'm assuming you mean ZZ vs ZQ, but yeah, no, probably not.



  • Dwarf Fortress doesn't have exit or quit. If you click the red X in the top right corner of the window (on Windows, obviously. substitute your OS's crazy positioning and icon-ing for the quit button here if you don't understand) while you have a fortress loaded, you get this screen:

    The options are:

    • close this screen and go back to the game
    • save the game's state to disk and go to the main menu, where you can actually quit
    • obviously unrelated to quitting or exiting
    • also unrelated
    • also unrelated. the option is grayed out because I have the music module disabled.
    • give control of your fortress to NPCs, save the game, and go to the main menu.
    • mark your fortress as a ruin, mark all your citizens as refugees, and scatter all your items across the ground so they invariably rot if you ever try to reclaim the site. and then save and go back to the main menu.

    Filed under: To anyone thinking the image darkening bug is fixed: look at the lower right corner of the image more closely.



  • What a shocker that such a graphicly-intense game like Dwarf Fortress doesn't react correctly to the close button.



  • In world of warcraft, I can press escape, and pick 'logout' or 'quit game' from the menu. Or I can type /quit.

    Or I can just hit alt-F4, which skips the 'asking the server for permission' bit and just kills the client. Legitimately helpful sometimes. Has the downside of not storing any configuration changes.



  • @ben_lubar said:

    mark your fortress as a ruin, mark all your citizens as refugees, and scatter all your items across the ground so they invariably rot if you ever try to reclaim the site. and then save and go back to the main menu

    That sounds like a quit in the context of this thread, doesn't it?



  • It reacts perfectly appropriately to the close button: With a "save game before exiting?" dialog. Which happens to look exactly like the ESC menu.



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    With a "save game before exiting?" dialog.

    FTFY



  • @blakeyrat said:

    "quit" implies you're stopping on purpose, finished using the program, "exit" implies the program exits suddenly without saving.

    [citation needed]



  • People quit programs when they're done. Programs exit when they crash or otherwise disappear with no user-interaction.

    People don't "exit" programs when they're done. Programs don't "quit" when they crash.



  • [citation needed]


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    On the other hand, I exit my office every day when I'm done working and I quit when I'm fed up with their idiotic bullshit and am not going to finish whatever they had me doing.



  • @blubar is right... that dialog isn't asking you to save, it's telling you to save.



  • You missed quite a few letters in @burnable



  • @blakeyrat said:

    People don't "exit" programs when they're done.

    exit()
    exit



  • Linux users aren't people, we've trod that territory a thousand times.



  • The first one happens to be from a Linux web site, but it's a C function. It's applicable to anybody who uses a program written in C (or C++?), regardless of OS.

    Also,
    sys.exit
    exit
    exit(status=true) Kernel::exit(status=true) Process::exit(status=true)
    exit()
    etc.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    The first one happens to be from a Linux web site, but it's a C function.

    C programs also are not people.

    I think you need psychiatric help.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    C programs also are not people.

    No, but people who use programs written in C are people, as are people who write programs in C. Both use exit(), although the users do so indirectly and without knowing it (probably).

    @blakeyrat said:

    I think you need psychiatric help.
    Undoubtedly true, although this is not an example of why.



  • C programs are written in people? :fearful:



  • @tar said:

    C programs are written in people? :fearful:

    Wat? I didn't say that. I said

    @HardwareGeek said:

    people who use programs written in C are people, as are people who write programs in C.
    Bolded words are the basic subject-verb-object of the main clauses of the sentences. Not bolded are subordinate clauses that identify specific subsets of [people] who are people.



  • Explanations are a barrier to humour?! :fearful:



  • @tar said:

    C programs are written in people?

    Well, they're made up of characters...



  • Characters, cast into the void...



  • Also, just to annoy @blakeyrat:

    If you are developing a Windows application, the correct term to use is "Exit". This is spelt out in Microsoft's Design apps for the Windows desktop guide, under the "Standard Menu Bars" section.

    If you are developing a Mac application, the correct term to use is "Quit". (Your menu item must read "Quit AppName".) This is spelt out in Apple's OS X Human Interface Guidelines, under "The App Menu" section.

    Consider the following when deciding on a term to use: - Exit - Some users may think (based on real world experience) that when you exit something you can return to it. - Quit - Should signify to the user that the application does terminate completely (rather than stay at the background).

    The grandma who has just got her first laptop

    I want this to go away ... quit [negative connotations, implies it is final, sometimes forever]

    I want this to go away ... exit [can be related to in real life]

    Update for Mac Users: I would say firstly go with what is right for the platform, but if it is a web app where that is not an option say I would also apply this example

    On a Windows Quit has the same connotations as a above

    On a Mac(/other) Exit is not the norm, however it is still expected and I beleive this would still be ok in terms of breaking the flow. It isn't like you are replacing Quit with Renounce for example!

    In my opinion, the 'Quit' action sounds more forceful, so it can be used to close an application which has failed to load or complete an action. It suggests the user wants the application to stop immediately. (For example, "Force Quit" on Mac OSX.) In contrast, the 'Exit' action sounds more gentle, so it can be used to stop an application after it has fully loaded. 'Exit' may prompt the user to save data, whereas 'Quit' will lose unsaved data.


    It seems like this post
    @blakeyrat said:

    "quit" implies you're stopping on purpose, finished using the program, "exit" implies the program exits suddenly without saving.

    is just another Apple fanboyism.


  • BINNED

    @tar said:

    C programs are written in people?

    :soylent_green.mp4: ?



  • That deserves a pendantry flag, and definitely a like for

    @Gaska said:

    just to annoy @blakeyrat



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Linux users aren't people, we've trod that territory a thousand times.

    DEHUMANIZATION DETECTED



  • @Gaska said:

    http://i.stack.imgur.com/U60fm.png

    Examples of both "exit" and "quit" can be found in the *nix world. Shells (at least the common ones; there may be exceptions, but I don't know of any) use exit. Quite a few of the EDA tools that I use, vi and friends, and perl -d use quit.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    Linux users aren't people, we've trod that territory a thousand times.

    CHECK YOUR WINDOWS PRIVILEGE!


  • BINNED

    I think he's just a user, but I heard rumors he's into elevation...



  • I'm pretty sure this thread has given me cancer.

    1. First we have the original WTF
    2. Then we have the assertion that the quit/exit distinction is meaningful and standard, when I can think of literally no other program that makes that same distinction
    3. Then we have blakeyrat's assertion that "'quit' implies you're stopping on purpose, finished using the program, 'exit' implies the program exits suddenly without saving"; apparently he never looked at the "Exit" menu item in, say, Visual Studio.
    4. Then we have the discussion of the API exit functions, as if that's particularly relevant to the terminology a program presents to the user. Apparently "file -> new" should be replaced by "creat".


  • @EvanED said:

    Then we have the discussion of the API exit functions, as if that's particularly relevant to the terminology a program presents to the user.

    Blakey said

    People don't "exit" programs when they're done.

    That statement does not (explicitly, at least) refer to "the terminology a program presents to the user." People do "exit" the program if the program terminates by calling a function named exit.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    That statement does not (explicitly, at least) refer to "the terminology a program presents to the user." People do "exit" the program if the program terminates by calling a function named exit.
    I thought it was quite clear that "People don't 'exit' programs when they're done" is referring to some mix of (1) the terminology the user has in their head for the action and (2) the verb the program presents to the user to carry out that action, considering that's what this thread was about.



  • Also, I'm surprised no one has yet said the word "abort" in this thread.



  • Just do that early if you're going to do it at all.



  • That's when you drop what you're doing, spend up to a minute writing it to disk, then exit?


  • BINNED

    Well, that's the only thing that works most of the time...



  • @PleegWat said:

    That's when you drop what you're doing, spend up to a minute writing it to disk, then exit?

    s/,.*,//


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