Bottled water


  • SockDev



  • Probably because some dictionary translates <whatever "mineral water" is in Chinese> into bottled water, which makes perfect sense as long as bottles are involved, and bottles are almost always involved.



  • It's not bottled now but it may have been bottled once.



  • I'm just about ready to order my second full case of this, and I still never know whether to call the container a bottle or a can (it's all aluminum, even the cap):


  • SockDev

    Bottle. It has a screw cap, so it's a bottle.


  • BINNED

    Canttle container?



  • @RaceProUK said:

    Bottle. it has a neck narrower than the body, so it's a bottle.

    FTFY.



  • The characters I can read on both cans are as follows (translation mine, but Google translate basically agrees with me, so make of that what you will):
    #非常災害用
    Extraordinary Disaster
    #飲料水
    Drinking Water

    The plot thickens...


  • SockDev

    @tar said:

    Extraordinary Disaster

    :laughing:



  • @tar said:

    非常災害用

    Extraordinary Disaster

    Bing got it more or less with more sense.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    I suppose they could be for disaster relief.

    If they're going to be used for air drops perhaps cans are more durable and less prone to rupturing than plastic bottles...


  • SockDev

    @DoctorJones said:

    air drops

    I would hope that the drops are fitted with parachutes effective enough to make it not matter how durable the bottles/cans are :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:



  • @RaceProUK said:

    I would hope that the drops are fitted with parachutes effective enough to make it not matter how durable the bottles/cans are

    I think I remember hearing some years about (US military?) using plastic pouches tough enough to just be tossed out of a plane without any sort of parachute and not rupture when they hit the ground, but Google failed me.



  • @DoctorJones said:

    I suppose they could be for disaster relief.

    I know that, e.g., Budweiser and Miller tend to ship cans of water for this purpose. I've not seen nor heard of them at other times.


  • SockDev

    @HardwareGeek said:

    I think I remember hearing some years about (US military?) using plastic pouches tough enough to just be tossed out of a plane without any sort of parachute and not rupture when they hit the ground, but Google failed me.

    I can buy that. They're probably made from similar material to FIA-spec racing fuel tanks; it's almost impossible to puncture them. Which is good news if you're an F1 driver, given said fuel tank is less than an inch from your shoulders :smile_cat:



  • Back of can

    nutritional facts: It's fucking water.

    @Gaska said:

    <whatever "mineral water" is in Chinese> into bottled water

    ...

    @RaceProUK said:

    I would hope that the drops are fitted with parachutes effective enough to make it not matter how durable the bottles/cans are

    phffeeeeeeewwwww smack
    "Um, I think we killed a guy with that drop"
    In international news "Breaking news, China has weaponized relief drops and is using them to kill off its own citizens"

    @RaceProUK said:

    They're probably made from similar material to FIA-spec racing fuel tanks; it's almost impossible to puncture them.

    Increases the lethality of terminal velocity.



  • @xaade said:

    ...

    What?



  • Comment, s'il vous plaît?



  • Oh man it's the Dragon Head emergency rations!!!!!



  • @boomzilla said:

    I know that, e.g., Budweiser and Miller tend to ship cans of water for this purpose.

    But those are branded "Bud Lite" and "Miller Lite" respectively.



  • @tar said:

    But those are branded "Bud Lite" and "Miller Lite" respectively.

    No, they just eliminate the step of passing the water through the horse before canning it.



  • @Gaska said:

    whatever "mineral water" is in Chinese

    Let's go with: 礦水

    ( Mandarin is such a literal language that I can't even come up with a 'funny' mistranslation based on picking the wrong word for the context...)



  • @xaade said:

    Comment, s'il vous plaît?

    That's what I'm asking you. Ellpisis suggests that I said something very stupid or I missed something very obvious. I'd like you to explain which of the two it is, and what exactly you're referring to.



  • I wanted to say something like, Engrish usually isn't that bad, and that they probably just inherited the idea from contained water being called bottled water 99% of the time, and really had nothing to do with mineral water at all.

    But I couldn't decide if it was worth the risk. So I just implied it with ...



  • I was referring to the fact that there are actual Polish-English dictionaries that translate "woda mineralna" into "bottled water".



  • hmmmm.... interesting.

    I wonder if that has to do with the fact that America doesn't have mineral water in bottles in any amount to gain attention. It's increasing, but slowly.

    Of course, there's the UK, but I wouldn't put it past people to be using American English as English, or American experiences at least.

    It's ironic because I could practically translate that without any experience in Polish, just by having an image with the words woda mineralna on it.


  • BINNED

    So, I went to check...

    Yes, it is wrong, Google. The language detection, for one.

    @Gaska biased the Google Translator, the bastard!

    Incidentally, it translates to "mineral water" when I fix the language.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Gaska said:

    I was referring to the fact that there are actual Polish-English dictionaries that translate "woda mineralna" into "bottled water".

    Closest thing to a literal "my hovercraft is full of eels" you'll see this year, probably.



  • It is Japanese rather than Chinese.
    The can says アルミ which means aluminum (for recycling).
    I think it is a well known fact that Japanese suck at English. I don't know why they don't use a few of the foreigners around to logic check the English or just not bother trying with it.



  • @Nprz said:

    It is Japanese rather than Chinese.

    Emergency water is probably better than bottled sweat (humorous connotation)



  • @Nprz said:

    Japanese suck at English

    Um.... they use an awful lot of gratuitous English for sucking at it so much.



  • @Nprz said:

    I don't know why they don't use a few of the foreigners around to logic check the English or just not bother trying with it.

    Isn't that the country where the manager is always right, by definition?



  • ¡El perro es en mi pantalones!



  • There was an episode of Blue Bloods where someone beat a guy nearly to death and then shoved a dead rat down his pants.



  • I will not buy this water; it is scratched.



  • My nipples explode with delight.


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