Why would you use IE?



  • I used to hate Internet Explorer. Now I just shake my head with a look of confusion every time I'm forced to use it. More of a morbid curiosity than hatred at this point.

    Someone called me to their office to help with a problem on their system. Unable to immediately diagnose the issue, I decided to pull up Google. Since this person only had IE installed, I reluctantly clicked that little blue E.

    I clicked in the address bar, and started typing "google" (because Ctrl-Enter is quite helpful to fill in that "www." and ".com" for you), when I saw something strange. The list of websites that were recently visited wasn't just restricted to websites. At the very top of the list was:

    "Google Earth.lnk"

    How in the world did a shortcut for Google Earth get into the recent history list of IE?? Did this moron computer user actually click-n-drag the icon into the browser window? I'm so confused!

    After a minute of investigation, I tracked down the issue. IE was putting the items on the user's Desktop into the recent history list. Shortcuts, documents, EXECUTABLES...whatever was on the Desktop, just start typing the first couple letters of the file name and there it is.

    What possible purpose could this serve?? How does this add any convenience for the user? And are there potential security issues with this type of "feature"?

    I love my Firefox.



  • I like IE.  Especially IE7.  (Before IE7 came along, I used the "wrapper" called Avant Browser that added tabbed browsing to IE.)  Yes, I know there are other choices for tabbed browsing, but I like IE.  It just works for me, on all the Web sites that I need to use, and I see no reason to change.  On a related note, I refuse to install Flash.

    I never see any links show up in the address bar.  Besides, I have a one-click icon in the Links bar for Google, so I never need to type Google into the address bar.   IE7 includes a built-in search bar that you can set to use Google, so you don't even need to go to www.google.com.



  • Funny you should mention that.  I got used to that feature and would start typing in shortcuts to websites that I had saved on my desktop. Upgraded to IE7 last week and it no longer does it.



  • You can browse your file system with IE in pretty much the same way as using windows explorer.  I guess people do this?  And these people like that you don't have to switch windows between your files and your web pages?  I have never done this, but I guess it's possible that enough people requested it that microsoft integrated that in?  I don't know how long it's been a "feature" but every version I have ever used did this, I believe.



  • Well, the problem is that the 'i'-explorer and that other explorer, also known as the shell, are more or less one and the same beast. So, for example, when you are browsing files in 'explorer' and you start typing into the address bar, explorer will happily switch into IE mode. Similarly, opening IE and typing 'My' will bring up My Computer and other stuff in the auto complete.

    The 'Google Earth' shortcut was just a desktop item that the auto complete -- one and the same system for both browsers -- offers as option.

    Yeah, it's stupid. 



  • [quote user="Manni"]

    After a minute of investigation, I tracked down the issue. IE was putting the items on the user's Desktop into the recent history list. Shortcuts, documents, EXECUTABLES...whatever was on the Desktop, just start typing the first couple letters of the file name and there it is.

    What possible purpose could this serve?? How does this add any convenience for the user? And are there potential security issues with this type of "feature"?

    [/quote]

    Now, that sounds like a messed-up installation of IE, or Windows, or something.  IE doesn't put items from MY desktop into my recent-history list.  (Why are there EXECUTABLES on the desktop anyway?  That's stupid.)

    The only things in the address-bar drop down in my Internet Explorer are Web addresses that I have typed into the address bar.

    Don't take the behavior of this borked system as the norm. 



  • I love my Firefox too.

    I read a review recently that pointed out that Firefox now looks more like a native Windows app, and IE 7 looks more like some kind of strange shareware.

    Speaking of weird stuff in the address bar, I got a kick out of IE the first time I tried this: put a pathname to an executable in there. Let's pick, oh I don't know, iexplore.exe.

     

    Press ENTER and we get:

     

    Hmm... it could be dangerous... but it's not REALLY from the Interweb, is it? Let's click 'Run'!


    Oh, no - the publisher can't be verified! That Microsoft must be some kind of fly-by-night operation.

    Oh well, thanks Internet Explorer for keeping me away from untrustworthy software! (Firefox will let me 'download' the .exe, but does not give the option to run it. I'm not sure if this is controlled by a setting.)



  • You can browse your file system with IE in pretty much the same way as using windows explorer.  I guess people do this?  And these people like that you don't have to switch windows between your files and your web pages?  I have never done this, but I guess it's possible that enough people requested it that microsoft integrated that in?  I don't know how long it's been a "feature" but every version I have ever used did this, I believe

    I do this all the time. THis is the MAIN reason I only use IE at home.

    For some reason I just always loved window reuse.

    So if I am in "My Documents" folder, but then all of a sudden need to  go look up something on google i just type the address in the same bar and there i go. then once im done searching google just hit the back button and now I am back to "My Documents" folder.

    I dont know why I do this instead of maybe jsut clicking the Firefox button in the quick launch, but I have just always done it this way and can't break out of the habit. 

    If firefox would implement this feature, i would switch in an instant, but since it doesn't I am sticking with IE.



  • There is a good reson for this.

    IE and windows expolrer are very tightly integrated, to the point where they share common items like history etc.

    This is actually very usefull as you can use your history to browse back and find files that you edited months ago and can no longer find, you can also go straight from browsing through folders to browsing a web site in the same window.

    Some people dont like this, personally I have ties when I like it others when I would rather that it worked another way, but until microsoft come up with a way of having the PC read my mind, I will have to stick to it working the way that it does.

    As a side note a quick look through all of the web logs that my company deals with shows that on average (for our sites) IE6 still has a 60% share, with IE5 and 7 Taking a furher 20.. IE is here to stay, as web developers (those of you who are) we should realise that although it may not be perfect there is a good chance that the majority of our users will be using IE -  was once told by a guy that he (and his sites) did not support IE as it was too buggy - alienating most of his users... but keeping a few fire foxusers happy.



  • [quote user="devy"]

    ..My last message goes here!

    [/quote]

     This has been a feature in IE since v3 (windows 95)... This is also one of the major problems with the anti trust suits... You CANT remove IE from windows... at best at the moment it can be hidden and "dissabled" (so that it cannot be directly accessed) but not removed... Personally  dont have a problem with this.



  • [quote user="R.Flowers"]

    I love my Firefox too.

    I read a review recently that pointed out that Firefox now looks more like a native Windows app, and IE 7 looks more like some kind of strange shareware.

    Speaking of weird stuff in the address bar, I got a kick out of IE the first time I tried this: put a pathname to an executable in there. Let's pick, oh I don't know, iexplore.exe.

     

    Press ENTER and we get:

     

    Hmm... it could be dangerous... but it's not REALLY from the Interweb, is it? Let's click 'Run'!

     


    Oh, no - the publisher can't be verified! That Microsoft must be some kind of fly-by-night operation.

    Oh well, thanks Internet Explorer for keeping me away from untrustworthy software! (Firefox will let me 'download' the .exe, but does not give the option to run it. I'm not sure if this is controlled by a setting.)

    [/quote]

     Of course it said that.  It's looking for a signed exe, and if the executable isn't signed, then you get that warning. 
     



  • [quote user="accident"]

    You can browse your file system with IE in pretty much the same way as using windows explorer.  I guess people do this?  And these people like that you don't have to switch windows between your files and your web pages?  I have never done this, but I guess it's possible that enough people requested it that microsoft integrated that in?  I don't know how long it's been a "feature" but every version I have ever used did this, I believe

    I do this all the time. THis is the MAIN reason I only use IE at home.

    For some reason I just always loved window reuse.

    So if I am in "My Documents" folder, but then all of a sudden need to  go look up something on google i just type the address in the same bar and there i go. then once im done searching google just hit the back button and now I am back to "My Documents" folder.

    I dont know why I do this instead of maybe jsut clicking the Firefox button in the quick launch, but I have just always done it this way and can't break out of the habit. 

    If firefox would implement this feature, i would switch in an instant, but since it doesn't I am sticking with IE.

    [/quote]

     

    Have you never tried to type C: in your firefox address bar? 



  • [quote user="accident"]If firefox would implement this feature, i would switch in an instant, but since it doesn't I am sticking with IE.[/quote]

    Depending on what you are working on, it can be very convenient to be able to go back and forth between the file system and the Internet.  I don't like FF's FTP style directory listing for local directories.

    On a side note, the differences between IE and FF are not significant enough to me to make me change my habits anyway.  I suppose I'm not slashdot-ish enough to harbor anti-IE feelings, or I suppose if I surfed more porn and warez sites, I might be more inclined to use a different browser.  The only reason I have Firefox (and Opera, Netscape, etc...) installed is because web-development is a necessary part of what I do. 



  • [quote user="Digitalbath"]You can browse your file system with IE in pretty much the same way as using windows explorer.  I guess people do this?  And these people like that you don't have to switch windows between your files and your web pages?  I have never done this, but I guess it's possible that enough people requested it that microsoft integrated that in?  I don't know how long it's been a "feature" but every version I have ever used did this, I believe.[/quote]

    Not so much an IE WTF, but I recently got a panicked phone call from a family member of mine.  In the address drop down in IE he saw the path to several files in the 'My Documents' folder.  He was sure some virus had hyjacked his computer and was sharing his files across the internet available to anyone.  It took me a long time to calm him down.

    Me an my wife had a good laugh over this, that particular reletive is not what I would call 'computer savvy'.  Then just last week a friend of my wife did almost the same thing.  A small part of the email exchange:

    Can you print it from there? 

    C:\Program Files\Belarc\Advisor\System\tmp\blahblah.html

    I fear for the human race. 



  • [quote user="DWalker59"]

    Besides, I have a one-click icon in the Links bar for Google, so I never need to type Google into the address bar.   IE7 includes a built-in search bar that you can set to use Google, so you don't even need to go to www.google.com.

    [/quote]

    I use both IE and FF although mostly I stick to IE.  Anyhow about the search thing.  You can specify a word/letter that you put in your address bar followed by your search terms and then tap go/enter and it does the search, I have 4 or 5 of these such as:

     g oldboy quote

    will open google.co.uk and search for oldboy quote.  The others I've entered search MSDN, Adobe live docs, Yahoo etc.  Its pretty handy and easy to implement.  Regedit and navigate to:

     HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\SearchUrl</p>

    Create the SearchUrl key if its not there already.  Inside there create a new key whose name is the letter/word you want to use; so using my google one the key is called "g" no quotes.  Inside that create a new string item with a value specified like this: 

    the %s is what will be replaced with your search string when its run i.e. "oldboy quote".



  • [quote user="DWalker59"]

    Besides, I have a one-click icon in the Links bar for Google, so I never need to type Google into the address bar.   IE7 includes a built-in search bar that you can set to use Google, so you don't even need to go to www.google.com.

    [/quote]

    I use both IE and FF although mostly I stick to IE.  Anyhow about the search thing.  You can specify a word/letter that you put in your address bar followed by your search terms and then tap go/enter and it does the search, I have 4 or 5 of these such as:

     g oldboy quote

    will open google.co.uk and search for oldboy quote.  The others I've entered search MSDN, Adobe live docs, Yahoo etc.  Its pretty handy and easy to implement.  Regedit and navigate to:

     HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\SearchUrl</p>

    Create the SearchUrl key if its not there already.  Inside there create a new key whose name is the letter/word you want to use; so using my google one the key is called "g" no quotes.  Inside that create a new string item with a value specified like this: 

    the %s is what will be replaced with your search string when its run i.e. "oldboy quote".



  • [quote user="Tann San"]You can specify a word/letter that you put in your address bar followed by your search terms and then tap go/enter and it does the search...[/quote]

    I created a handful of shortcuts after reading your post, and already have been using them today. Thanks for that tip! 



  • Have you never tried to type C: in your firefox address bar? 

    ya but it gives an FTP type view of it, and whenever I try running an app it asks me to  "Download the file", why would I want to download it when it is already on my computer?

    Unless they changed how it worked recently, I like the IE style way better.

    Also, I have been using IE for years (since windows 95), During that time span i have only every got a virus once (and that was because I was at a lan party, and I copied a file from my friends computer that had a virus).

    Sure I used to get some spyware, but that was back when I had 56k and no firewall/router or anything. Ever since I got broadband (about four years ago) I have not received any viruses or spyware (or atleast not any spyware that has actually affected me)

    So how come I haven't downloaded any spyware or viruses? Because I use common sense. I don't go to any old site that people link me, I only go to trusted sites. I don't download attachments in my email unless I know who they are from AND I am expecting it.  Sure the browser might be a part of the security, but the user is the main part.

     



  • [quote user="devy"][quote user="devy"]

    ..My last message goes here!

    [/quote]

     This has been a feature in IE since v3 (windows 95)... This is also one of the major problems with the anti trust suits... You CANT remove IE from windows... at best at the moment it can be hidden and "dissabled" (so that it cannot be directly accessed) but not removed... Personally  dont have a problem with this.

    [/quote]

    It was actually IE4, for 98. IE3 you could install separately, but never came bundled with windows (except as an add-on on OSR2 and maybe later vesions of Plus). 



  • [quote user="foxyshadis"][quote user="devy"][quote user="devy"]

    ..My last message goes here!

    [/quote]

     This has been a feature in IE since v3 (windows 95)... This is also one of the major problems with the anti trust suits... You CANT remove IE from windows... at best at the moment it can be hidden and "dissabled" (so that it cannot be directly accessed) but not removed... Personally  dont have a problem with this.

    [/quote]

    It was actually IE4, for 98. IE3 you could install separately, but never came bundled with windows (except as an add-on on OSR2 and maybe later vesions of Plus). 

    [/quote]

    Hhhhmmm I seem to remember having an ie by default with my 95. Could be wrong though, it was a while ago.

    On the topic of the inability to remove or hiding ie from windows, I really wonder why anyone would bother. Having ie there doesn't stop you from installing firefox or opera and setting them as the default. I wonder how many KDE users uninstall Konquerer, or complain about how difficult it is to completely remove it without killing the file manager.

    I use ie on the XP box I use at work, firefox on my linux only home box and when I have the pleasure of working with apples I use safari, all because I really don't care enough to install extra crap unless I have too. Where I have input into decisions on standardising on a particular browser, I tend to recommend FF for the obvious reason that it's free, stable and runs on a wide range of OSs.


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