Combining excercise with dicsource pics makes for a wonderful passtime



  • I saw this, and thought of you:

    Curious Perversions in Technology. ITS ON TOPIC!



  • You've got to hand it to the city planners too. This wouldn't be possible without them.



  • I figured this would be way harder in the UK than the states, and I think that's true. Still doable though.

    feel free to go for a run round here!


  • SockDev

    There was a fun run around my town a bit back and the map ended up being roughly the cock-n-balls shape. Sadly I can't seem to find a map right now.



  • Did they name those streets at 4:55 on a Friday afternoon? "Screw it, all these ones are called rainbow."



  • So that's where Mario Kart is played.



  • @hungrier said:

    Did they name those streets at 4:55 on a Friday afternoon? "Screw it, all these ones are called rainbow."

    nope, its how we do things round here. As you can see there is a "Rainbow Forge Primary School". Roads are often named after things that are nearby, and then people want to build more houses so they build a new road and name it after the old one but with a different suffix (rd/avenue/way/lane etc etc).

    It's quite common, same with birley (you can see birley spa lane where the top of the shaft is) and you will see plenty of examples in other UK cities.

    we also have roads that change their names halfway along for no reason. see the road in the middle there? just underneath the green patch? At the Sheffield end it's called "Beighton Rd" because it leads to Beighton, and at the Beighton end it's "Sheffield Rd" because it leads to Sheffield. It's the same road. Matlock/Chesterfield road is the exact same thing, its the worst.

    Brought to you by the UK, Pioneers in Schrödinger's Roads.



  • Here in Washington State, we have roads that have two or more names simultaneously. So there.



  • I was pretty sure that was what I was describing



  • No. You were describing roads that have two names because their name changes at some point. I was describing roads that have two or more names at the same point.

    If you wanna get into "total names", Highway 99 in Washington State was created by connecting like 30 cities' main streets, and has like 50 names if you follow it all the way along the State. EDIT: also a good example of the "2 names at a given point" thing, since through Everett Highway 99 is both Highway 99 and Evergreen Way simultaneously.



  • if you want to play it that way, we have that too, but more and better and local and British and proper and northern.

    https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/A632/@53.1592984,-1.5095723,17z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x487990f27f08b48d:0xefcb2780d0ef1c9d

    As you can see, It's the A632 all along (the equivalent of your "highway 99") but it's name is dual and differing. Some places it's Chesterfield Road, or Amber Lane, or Matlock Road, or eventually Walton road. But always A632.


  • SockDev

    There's also a road near me that is the A273, before it becomes the B2036 for a stretch, before becoming the A273 again.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    I believe there are some roads in London where different sides of the same stretch of road have different names. That's deeply fucked up. (I don't think the roads are all that wide either. That would be too easy.)



  • I think there's an area around Philadelphia where you can be on I-476 East and I-76 West (or vice versa) at the same time.

    It's common to have parts of a road be part of multiple route systems (county, state, federal, interstate) plus a proper name, but that doesn't seem to be the same thing to me as having two distinct names in one stretch of road.


  • SockDev

    @dkf said:

    I believe there are some roads in London where different sides of the same stretch of road have different names. That's deeply fucked up. (I don't think the roads are all that wide either. That would be too easy.)

    There are but sadly none come to mind.

    Then again there's a road called Poultry in central London too.



  • There's a spot in Kansas City where I-29, I-35, I-70, and US-71 all merge and become the same highway. Road signs, maps, and GPS will randomly select one of the names and it gets very confusing unless you already know it's all the same thing for a few miles.

    I-29 also becomes I-49. Same road, same direction, but silly naming rules mean the name has to change once I-35 crosses it. Oh and it's also US-71. They just decided to make it an interstate so now it has two different names.



  • @boomzilla said:

    I think there's an area around Philadelphia where you can be on I-476 East and I-76 West (or vice versa) at the same time.

    That's actually normal. 3-digit freeway names are bypasses; it's perfectly reasonable for a bypass to go generally west while the segment you're on happens to overlap with a freeway going generally east.

    Weird. Yes. But not that weird. And of course you east coasters have those horrifying "loop" freeways that probably make it necessary.

    What's also a little odd is that bypass names are only unique-per-State, not globally unique. So there's actually three freeways named I-405. One in California, one in Oregon, and one in Washington.

    #FreewayFactx



  • @blakeyrat said:

    And of course you east coasters have those horrifying "loop" freeways that probably make it necessary.

    When I first moved to the DC area, it took me a bit to figure out what they meant by inner and outer loop (probably confounded by the fact that I didn't have a car at the time). Now it's normal, and more convenient to use than compass directions. Signage does use directions, but they typically use "To $City" style things at interchanges, which helps.

    @blakeyrat said:

    What's also a little odd is that bypass names are only unique-per-State, not globally unique. So there's actually three freeways named I-405. One in California, one in Oregon, and one in Washington.

    Yeah, but of course with country spanning roads like I-5, I-95, I-10, etc., you either have to do that or break out the 4 digit numbers.



  • An excellent way to gamify running!

    Filed under: let's gamify everything!, and I do mean EVERYTHING


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @boomzilla said:

    Yeah, but of course with country spanning roads like I-5, I-95, I-10, etc., you either have to do that or break out the 4 digit numbers.

    4-digit road numbering can work (we use it for local roads that are maintained by the equivalent-of-US-county, most of which don't really go anywhere much) but reusing the numbers is pretty sensible.

    Restarting the junction numbering at at each state border isn't. It must be murder in areas like the south end of Lake Michigan (and the traffic will be bad too).

    But you beat Sweden. For years, they only gave their junctions names


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    And, as someone points out in the comments (bearing in mind which paper this is from):

    I wonder what the reaction would be if a male runner drew a vagina...



  • @PJH said:

    And, as someone points out in the comments (bearing in mind which paper this is from):

    "I wonder what the reaction would be if a male runner drew a vagina..."

    "BAN THIS SICK FILTH!"



  • @dkf said:

    4-digit road numbering can work (we use it for local roads that are maintained by the equivalent-of-US-county, most of which don't really go anywhere much) but reusing the numbers is pretty sensible.

    We have it for local stuff, too. I don't know why the interstate system is the way it is, but it's not that big of a deal.

    @dkf said:

    Restarting the junction numbering at at each state border isn't. It must be murder in areas like the south end of Lake Michigan (and the traffic will be bad too).

    That doesn't seem to be a problem at all. The numberings I've seen are directionally consistent, so there's really not much confusion between exit 132 and exit 2.

    @dkf said:

    But you beat Sweden. For years, they only gave their junctions names…

    The freeways in Southern California didn't used to be numbered, let alone by distance. That seems to have changed in recent years.



  • @dkf said:

    But you beat Sweden. For years, they only gave their junctions names…

    A lot of junctions here in Washington State have names. Welcome to Thrasher's Corner: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Thrasher's+Corner+Sports+Pub/@47.808889,-122.207068,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x54900f6b7b1aac75:0xdc1aab4e3c444925

    EDIT: Wow, that link I pulled from the Google Maps URL bar goes nowhere even remotely close to what the map was showing when I copied it. Kudos, Google, you have finished completely breaking Maps.

    Try this one: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Thrasher's+Corner+Sports+Pub/@47.8093105,-122.2076661,18z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x54900f6b7b1aac75:0xdc1aab4e3c444925

    Note that the two links have nearly identical embedded lattitude and longitude values, and yet the first one points to Klamath Falls, Oregon and the second to Washington.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    That's bizarre. They both point to the same somewhere in the middle of nowhere (i.e., Arkansas) for me.



  • BUT THE LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE IS RIGHT THERE IN THE LIN-- how the FUCK do you fuck that up!?



  • It sent me to Thrasher Basement Systems, Inc. in West Omaha.



  • OK well the fucking point is the interchange between 527 and 524 in Washington is named Thrasher's Corner. You'll just have to trust me.



  • Google Maps is a barrier to geography.



  • Both links dump me onto a Thrasher Rd in Robinson, KS.

    If I unfuck the links (because the link, when clicked, changes Thrasher's+Corner+Sports+Pub to Thrasher's+Corner+Sports+Pub, and Google gave up on the ampersand) both point me to where I'm sure you wanted to point out.


    Also, I somehow blew up the first link trying to copy from it. It now no longer has an href. Hooray for horrible Discourse.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Cut-n-paste the URL works. It's Discourse to the “rescue”!


    There's a road junction called Fox Corner not too far from home. None of the streets into it have “Fox” in the name. For significant junctions of long-standing, that's not too odd. But naming your freeway junctions where you're expecting to have lots of people from out of town going through? Utterly nuts. (FWIW, the Swedes finally saw the light a few years ago and started adding numbers as well, which is a hell of a lot easier for non-local folks.)



  • @blakeyrat said:

    through Everett Highway 99 is both Highway 99, Pacific Highway and Evergreen Way simultaneously.

    FTFY.

    Until Highway 99 veers off onto Everett Mall Way and Evergreen continues on to, eventually, become Rucker Ave for no apparent reason.



  • Oh shit, right, I totally forgot about Pacific Highway. People don't say it often, but it's totally a legit name.



  • @boomzilla said:

    you can be on I-476 East and I-76 West

    The same thing happens on I-80/I-580 between Oakland and Richmond (I think) in California. Note, the road is running more-or-less north/south at that point.



  • @boomzilla said:

    The freeways in Southern California didn't used to be numbered, let alone by distance. That seems to have changed in recent years.

    I think you mean the exits didn't used to be numbered. The freeways have been numbered (I-5, I-405, I-10, US-101, etc.) for as long as I can remember, but nobody used the numbers. Golden State Freeway, San Diego Freeway, Santa Monica Freeway, Hollywood Freeway, etc. In northern California the highways also have names, but for the most part nobody uses them — Bayshore and Nimitz occasionally, but that's about it.

    The Feds didn't impose the exit numbering system on California because the existing signs were deemed clear and unambiguous enough. But a few years ago they decided California should finally make life easier for out-of-state visitors who were used to numbered exits.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    I think you mean the exits didn't used to be numbered.

    Eh, yeah.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    But a few years ago they decided California should finally make life easier for out-of-state visitors who were used to numbered exits.

    That makes sense. I like the numbered exits as a way to figure out how far I have to go, even in areas I'm familiar with.



  • Yeah, I think the only reason it wasn't done from the start was that the state didn't want to pay for umpteen gazillion new signs. IIRC, when they did start numbering the exits, they only did it for signs that needed to be replaced anyway, at least at first.


  • mod

    @blakeyrat said:

    I was describing roads that have two or more names at the same point.

    All of these examples you guys gave are unimpressive (except maybe the London one from @dkf and possibly confirmed by @arantor). All of them seem to involve a highway, tollroad, or something similar. In those cases, having a local name within a municipality is fairly common. What's less common is having two coinciding local names. I used to live within 1/4 mile of a street that was both Jackrabbit Trail and 195th Ave for about 2 miles. If you keep heading north of the overlap, Jackrabbit Trail prevails; south and it remains 195th Ave.



  • I-76W in Akron. Ohio. You have to exit to stay on it. Got me all three times I've been there.



  • I5 South just after passing the WA OR border is the same way. If you're not careful, you can end up going into Oregon, then making a slow 180 turn and leaving Oregon, without changing lanes or exiting once.

    That literally happened to me actually.



  • @dkf said:

    4-digit road numbering can work (we use it for local roads that are maintained by the equivalent-of-US-county, most of which don't really go anywhere much) but reusing the numbers is pretty sensible.

    Restarting the junction numbering at at each state border isn't. It must be murder in areas like the south end of Lake Michigan (and the traffic will be bad too).

    But you beat Sweden. For years, they only gave their junctions names

    Texas uses it for their Farm-to-Market roads, such as FM 2222 in Austin.



  • I-5S here north of San Diego splits with the I-805 bypass. Only the one right-most lane of the 5 continues on the 5.



  • @abarker said:

    having a local name within a municipality is fairly common. What's less common is having two coinciding local names.

    How about "Edmonds Rd  Holly Dr  Edmonds Rd  Holly Dr  Edmonds Rd  84th St SE"?

    No, it doesn't intersect with E Casino Rd.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @HardwareGeek said:

    How about "Edmonds Rd  Holly Dr  Edmonds Rd  Holly Dr  Edmonds Rd  84th St SE"?

    Is that one of those places where opposite sides of the (sub/urban) road have different names?

    Got one not too far from me. Unfortunately Google Maps either doesn't know about it (yet) or doesn't care to show it.



  • @PJH said:

    Is that one of those places where opposite sides of the (sub/urban) road have different names?

    I don't really know. I rather suspect it's really just confusion on the part of Google. IIRC, the signs at the intersection that is just off the SW corner of the map say "Holly Dr." There is no sign on Evergreen to indicate what name it goes by on the other side (it doesn't actually intersect with Evergreen; there's a business or something in the way), but if you continue SW on it, it eventually changes its name again to Beverly Park Rd.


  • :belt_onion:

    Why is this 2+ names for 1 road thing so confounding? Who doesn't live near at least 1 road that has multiple names?? Especially some of these where the name is only changing because you're following a major connector route through different towns that have different main street names.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @darkmatter said:

    Why is this 2+ names for 1 road thing so confounding?

    Because it's idiotic. You have a single-carriage road, split into two single lanes - one in each direction. Along each side of the road you have houses. With different street-names.

    The road I was talking about is this one:

    Long Bank only applies to the houses on the left. Coniston Gardens applies to the houses on the right.


  • mod

    :headdesk:


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Something I said/thought?


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.