WTF?



  • So I give my notice at my current job and I tell my boss that my last day will be the 29th of September (2 weeks notice). My boss takes the weekend to think about if he's going to accept my notice (like he had a choice?) and then that following Monday decides to sit with me and review my schedule. After a tedious process of telling me everything that I already knew that I had to do he says to me and I quote;

    "Oh ya, and I'm going to have you stay through the first week of October your cheaper as an employee rather than a consultant..."

    I can't say that I was shocked by this but I was rather annoyed. I reminded him that my last day was the 29th and he was apalled with me because he said that "he tole me" I'd be working through the first week of October. I told him that it was the 29th or nothing. He left.

    WTF?



  • Well, what does your contract say? I don't know about the US, but here in the UK employment contracts are required to specify a notice period. If I want to leave before mine is up, I'm SOL unless my boss agrees... (Similarly, of course, they can't get me out any quicker if I disagree)



  • AFAIK in the US "two week notice" is merely a curteousy 



  • I resigned from a UK job with a 3 month notice either way, and they made me work every last day of it.  This was a pain but it does cut both ways.  If they wanted to fire me they could either have me doing work for three months or pay me to stay at home for the same period, commonly known as 'gardening leave'.  That is unless I got caught doing something really unsavoury/illegal in which case I think they can cut this short.



  • In the US, most jobs are at-will meaning either party can terminate the employment at any time for just about any reason.  There is a set of things an employer can't fire you for, but if they want to get rid of you, they can always find a reason.
     

     



  • [quote user="mhughes"]In the US, most jobs are at-will meaning either party can terminate the employment at any time for just about any reason.  There is a set of things an employer can't fire you for, but if they want to get rid of you, they can always find a reason.[/quote]

    Yes, but similarly, you don't need any reason to leave an employer. It is considered impolite to leave with less than 2 weeks notice, but usually it is legal.  The most common consequence is inelegibility to be rehired by that particular employer.

    So, assuming that the OP works in the US, or a country with similar laws, he manager pulled a big "dee dee dee".

     



  • [quote user="Kazan"]AFAIK in the US "two week notice" is merely a curteousy 
    [/quote]

    Hmm, given the turnovers I agree with that.

    As the saying goes....if he's not at his desk for three days on the trot without notice, he must have left for a better gig.



  • [quote user="hellboy"]

    "Oh ya, and I'm going to have you stay through the first week of October your cheaper as an employee rather than a consultant..."

    [/quote]

    I would have smiled. Said, "Its been a pleasure working for you." And been out the door 5 minutes later.  You aren't expecting a reference from this gentleman?
     



  • MET - 3 months notice???? That's completely absurd. Unless you're in a
    critical position high up in a company, e.g. CEO or something, that's
    just outrageous. It's got to seriously impact your job-seeking
    potential, too. How many companies will be willing to wait a quarter of
    a year for you to become available?

    I've never met anyone who had to give more than one month notice. (UK here, too)

    As for hellboy's situation... I don't know the legal situation wherever you are, butwhat's actually specified in your contract as the required notice period?



  • [quote user="RayS"]

    MET - 3 months notice???? That's completely absurd. Unless you're in a
    critical position high up in a company, e.g. CEO or something, that's
    just outrageous. It's got to seriously impact your job-seeking
    potential, too. How many companies will be willing to wait a quarter of
    a year for you to become available?

    I've never met anyone who had to give more than one month notice. (UK here, too)

    [/quote]

    Here in Austria, 3 months are quite common; of course this makes it harder to find a job unless you just don't care, since the employer can hardly do anything if you go earlier (other than giving you a bad reference). BTW, waiting 3 monts for good people is normal, too, trust me 😉



  • I left a job after 3 months notice one time.  It just so happens that it coincided with me moving to a different location of the country and I knew about it for 3 months.  Don't make assumptions.



  • [quote user="RayS"]

    MET - 3 months notice???? That's completely absurd. ... How many companies will be willing to wait a quarter of
    a year for you to become available?

    [/quote]

    Actually I think it is quite a good test of the company you are moving to.  It lets you know they are serious 🙂

    Any manager with experience will know that finding someone good takes a couple of months and that people take six months to become really productive in a new position, so the extra couple of months does not really matter.  Some companies base the notice period on length of service, so 1 month for the first two years, then two for the next three and so on.  This makes sense to me as usually the longer someone has worked for you the more impact their leaving will have.

     



  • No, I'm not looking for a reference just a way out. The job was is really horrible. I wanted to just leave, however I feel this need to always do what I state and in this case its working out the two weeks.



  • [quote user="hellboy"]No, I'm not looking for a reference just a way out. The job was is really horrible. I wanted to just leave, however I feel this need to always do what I state and in this case its working out the two weeks.[/quote]

    Before he told you that you HAD to work a third week, you did owe him 2 weeks notice.

    Now, the responsible action is to 'educate' this manager, so that he will be more responsible in the future.

    My previously unstated assumption is that there is no Human Resources department to go to.
     

     



  • [quote user="RayS"]How many companies will be willing to wait a quarter of a year for you to become available?[/quote]

     I've kept companies waiting longer than that.  If they want you, they'll wait, at least in this job market. 

    -cw



  • here in Ireland if you've been working in a job for any longer that 13 weeks then you are required to give a minimum of 1 weeks notice, unless it states otherwise in your contract. And if an employer is terminating your job then he also has to give notice depending on how long you've been working for that company

    http://www.entemp.ie/employment/rights_old/minimumnotice.htm



  • [quote user="tster"]I left a job after 3 months notice one time.  It just so happens that it coincided with me moving to a different location of the country and I knew about it for 3 months.  Don't make assumptions.
    [/quote]

     

    Well, yes, but then you wouldn't be posting about it here, would you?

     

    No, wait.  I mean, you wouldn't be posting about it here as a WTF.  There, that's better.

     



  • [quote user="hellboy"]

    "Oh ya, and I'm going to have you stay through the first week of October your cheaper as an employee rather than a consultant..."

    [/quote]

    Does this man you are planning to be hired back as an independent contractor (or something like that) after you leave your 'employee' status? If so, I can see where the inconvenience might put you in a bind. But other than that, you don't even 'owe' them 2 weeks. How many companies give 2 weeks notice before firing a person? Not many.

    Obviously, I'm speaking for US workplaces. 



  • Similar situation when I was working as a contractor:

    "You're not in the office enough. I need you here every morning by eight, and at least until six. I'll also need you to come in on the weekends." 

    "I can't spend every standard office hour of every standard work day in your office. I have other clients."

    "Well, I don't think you having other clients is in the best interest of my company."

    There were a great many other WTFs from that particular client, but I'd really rather not think too much about him right now.



  • [quote user="Rick"]

    [quote user="hellboy"]No, I'm not looking for a reference just a way out. The job was is really horrible. I wanted to just leave, however I feel this need to always do what I state and in this case its working out the two weeks.[/quote]

    Before he told you that you HAD to work a third week, you did owe him 2 weeks notice.

    Now, the responsible action is to 'educate' this manager, so that he will be more responsible in the future.

    My previously unstated assumption is that there is no Human Resources department to go to. [/quote]

    You should make your deals with HR, if you have a HR dept., so your manager has no say in the matter.

     




  • ammoQ:

    RayS:

    MET - 3 months notice???? That's completely absurd. Unless you're in a critical position high up in a company, e.g. CEO or something, that's just outrageous. It's got to seriously impact your job-seeking potential, too. How many companies will be willing to wait a quarter of a year for you to become available?

    I've never met anyone who had to give more than one month notice. (UK here, too)

    Here in Austria, 3 months are quite common; of course this makes it harder to find a job unless you just don't care, since the employer can hardly do anything if you go earlier (other than giving you a bad reference). BTW, waiting 3 monts for good people is normal, too, trust me 😉

    I gave 6 months notice at the last job I left.  Not out of any loyalty to the company itself.  Got a double christmas bonus in May to boot!



  • I have to give props to that boss.  Yes it's extremely arrogant, but what did he have to lose? If his intimidation worked he'd get an extra week out of you; if it didn't, well, you're gonna be gone anyway, and he'd already decided not to give you a reference.



  • @rpresser said:

    I have to give props to that boss.
    And I have to give props to a year and a half old thread's ability to rise from the grave.

     

    Seriously, let the dead rest in peace.



  • @RayS said:

    @rpresser said:

    I have to give props to that boss.
    And I have to give props to a year and a half old thread's ability to rise from the grave.

    Seriously, let the dead rest in peace.

     

    It is featured on the front page... Was my first reaction too though.



  • @RayS said:

    @rpresser said:

    I have to give props to that boss.
    And I have to give props to a year and a half old thread's ability to rise from the grave.

    Seriously, let the dead rest in peace.

     

    Quiet, you fool!  If you post on it, it'll stick around longer!  Wait a minute...



  • 3 Months notice is customary in Sweden atleast, on a new job you have six months of "trial" period and with 1 month notice if leaving and after that 3 months...



  • In Brazil, if you (the employee) leave, you are legally required to do a 20 to 30 day notice (it varies according to whether you want to do full hours or a reduced period).

    But that only happens if you are a legally registered full-time employee. Due to enormeous taxes, lots of employers and employees opt instead to be "long term contractors", in which case there is no law other than what is on the contract, but most places I worked on this scheme expect you to do some reasonable notice (and prospectant employers also comprehend that you may need that, since you may be binded by the law mentioned on the first paragraph.


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