So apparently you can now get these...



  • I spotted it on Facebook and did a search by image on Google, but can't find any further context. Sure is funny though.



  • On the surface it's funny, but you do know that the Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament), right? And someone had to translate it. Have a Bible signed by the translator isn't WTF at all.



  •  or that bible belonged to someone "famous" and put his name in it



  • @gramie said:

    On the surface it's funny, but you do know that the Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament), right? And someone had to translate it. Have a Bible signed by the translator isn't WTF at all.

    Fair enough, that sounds reasonable.

    I couldn't find anything on Google about signed bibles; most of the results are to do with Bibles for deaf people, which is an entirely different type of signing.



  • Did you try using TinEye reverse image search?

    Also, why are you hotlinking an image from Phil Cooke's Facebook page?



  • @anotherusername said:

    TinEye
     

    So how does TinEye compare to google's reverse image search?



  • @anotherusername said:

    Did you try using TinEye reverse image search?

    No, but I used Google's reverse image search and got no additional context. I only got sites that referenced the image with a "lol, WTF is this?".

    I haven't heard of TinEye before, is it any good?



  • This is my biggest problem with Christianity; while most languages have the convention of "signed by default, unsigned requires declaration", ie, short vs unsigned short, apparently they have unsigned as default, and signed requires declaration.

    It's all the little gotchas that make coding with it annoying.



  • @dhromed said:

    So how does TinEye compare to google's reverse image search?
    @DoctaJonez said:
    I haven't heard of TinEye before, is it any good?

    That's why I posted a screenshot of the results, so you can decide for yourself.

    I've found it to work pretty well sometimes and not others, so when one of them fails to turn up anything useful it's probably worth a shot to try the other. I don't think its database is as extensive as Google's but it has a pretty good image matching algorithm which can find matches for images even if they've been significantly altered.



  • @DoctaJonez said:

    @gramie said:
    On the surface it's funny, but you do know that the Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament), right? And someone had to translate it. Have a Bible signed by the translator isn't WTF at all.
    Fair enough, that sounds reasonable.
    The picture is too small to read the find print, but I can see that it is ESV. Translation is typically done by a committee, and the ESV is no exception. The ESV is recent enough that one or more members of the translation committee could have signed it, but it seems more likely to me that lost in the unreadable fine print is a statement that this edition contains a commentary, study notes, or something of the sort, and that it was signed by the author of that material.



  • Perhaps someone put that sticker there as a joke. Sort of like the stuff you'll see at a supermarket where some mischievious person will swap signs around or change price stickers.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @DoctaJonez said:
    @gramie said:
    On the surface it's funny, but you do know that the Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament), right? And someone had to translate it. Have a Bible signed by the translator isn't WTF at all.
    Fair enough, that sounds reasonable.
    The picture is too small to read the find print, but I can see that it is ESV. Translation is typically done by a committee, and the ESV is no exception. The ESV is recent enough that one or more members of the translation committee could have signed it, but it seems more likely to me that lost in the unreadable fine print is a statement that this edition contains a commentary, study notes, or something of the sort, and that it was signed by the author of that material.


    Or it's signed by the famous members of the committee. Wouldn't be too difficult to have a "signature page" like the Declaration of Independence.



  •  Or it's signed by God.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.



  • @Ben L. said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?



  • @Snooder said:

    Or it's signed by the famous members of the committee. Wouldn't be too difficult to have a "signature page" like the Declaration of Independence.
    Well, I did write@HardwareGeek said:
    one or more members of the translation committee could have signed it
    However, there are no "famous" members of Bible translation committees. Their names are listed somewhere in the preface, but with the possible exception of a small handful of people back in the day when the Roman Catholic church still considered people who had the gall to translate the Bible from Latin into a language common people could understand to be heretics and executed some of them, you've never heard of any of them.

    ETA: Having now read mott555's suggestion, I think that is the most likely.



  • @Buttembly Coder said:

    Filed under: That and that the Date objects only go back as far as 6000 years

    Still better than Unix, where all dates start at "that time The Dead were playing at the Fillmore and the Owsley acid was just flowin' and it was, like, out there..

    ..like, we were freaked, The Dead were freaked, and the whole plastic fantastic Shiny Black Shoes American Dream suburban fantasyland was ready to be freaked..

    ..like, livin' in San Mateo county in your little box of ticky-tack and takin' your kids to clarinet practice in your Shiny Ford Machine, that's the real trip! We're the ones who are sober, dig?"*


    (*Official definition of Unix epoch, from Bell Labs' 1971 Unix programming manual.)



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Or it's signed by God.

    God: "Oh Me, my hand is cramping up again.. Jesus, how many more of these do I have to sign?"

    Jesus: "Well, the limited run was 50,000 copies, so you've only got 48,971 to go.."

    God: "Oh c'mon! That's it, I'm calling it quits.."

    Jesus: "Look, you're still short on your 2013 tax bill. You saw what the IRS did to Willie; is that what you want?"

    God: "grumble grumble Fine, hand me that pen. And go get me some more naproxen.."



  • @drurowin said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?
    Obviously God does. That's what the first G is.

     



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    However, there are no "famous" members of Bible translation committees.

    What about Dwayne "Dirty Scrollz" Smith, Richie "Westside.. of Jerusalem" Sanders and Lil' CodeX?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @morbiuswilters said:

    (*Official definition of Unix epoch, from Bell Labs' 1971 Unix programming manual.)
    I thought that was “since the moment men first stood on the moon, except they got the calculations wrong”.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @drurowin said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?



  • @FrostCat said:

    @drurowin said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?

    I wonder if lojbanis are like Eskimos. You know, like, do they have 49 words for "I'm a virgin"?



  • @gramie said:

    On the surface it's funny, but you do know that the Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament), right? And someone had to translate it. Have a Bible signed by the translator isn't WTF at all.

    It's not only funny on the surface. It's funny deep down.

    And depending on what you mean by "The Bible", it was written in Aramaic, Hebrew, Greek, Latin, German, or English. I don't think there is one set of texts universally acknowledged as The Bible.



  • @gramie said:

    On the surface it's funny, but you do know that the Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament), right? And someone had to translate it. Have a Bible signed by the translator isn't WTF at all.

    Um, yes it is. Who the hell would value the signature of a Bible translator? The whole point of signing something is that you have the smallest connection to someone, usually famous, who matters to you.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @FrostCat said:
    @drurowin said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?

    I wonder if lojbanis are like Eskimos. You know, like, do they have 49 words for "I'm a virgin"?

    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".



  • @Ben L. said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    @FrostCat said:
    @drurowin said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?

    I wonder if lojbanis are like Eskimos. You know, like, do they have 49 words for "I'm a virgin"?

    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    So, what exactly is and is not considered sex to lojban people? Or does it even matter?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @FrostCat said:
    @drurowin said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?

    I wonder if lojbanis are like Eskimos. You know, like, do they have 49 words for "I'm a virgin"?

    Based on a quick skim of the Wikipedia page on Lojban, I'm guessing they probably have one word, but 49 ways of inflecting it to indicate various emotional states associated with the statement.



  • @Ben L. said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    @FrostCat said:
    @drurowin said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?

    I wonder if lojbanis are like Eskimos. You know, like, do they have 49 words for "I'm a virgin"?

    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Let X be the set of Lojban speakers. Is there any member xn of X that is not nu'ogle living in his mother's basement?



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @morbiuswilters said:
    @FrostCat said:
    @drurowin said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?

    I wonder if lojbanis are like Eskimos. You know, like, do they have 49 words for "I'm a virgin"?

    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Let X be the set of Lojban speakers. Is there any member xn of X that is not nu'ogle living in his mother's basement?
    Let's back this train up a second. Up until about 10 minutes ago, I thought logjam longjohn lojban was a programming language. If it has a word for "virgin", then what the fuck is it?



  • @drurowin said:

    @HardwareGeek said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @morbiuswilters said:
    @FrostCat said:
    @drurowin said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @Lorne Kates said:

     Or it's signed by God.


    Signed using God's GPG key.
    Does anyone still use GPG?

    You're asking that to a guy who uses Go and lojban?

    I wonder if lojbanis are like Eskimos. You know, like, do they have 49 words for "I'm a virgin"?

    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Let X be the set of Lojban speakers. Is there any member xn of X that is not nu'ogle living in his mother's basement?
    Let's back this train up a second. Up until about 10 minutes ago, I thought logjam longjohn lojban was a programming language. If it has a word for "virgin", then what the fuck is it?
    @Wikipedia said:
    Lojban (pronounced locally: [ˈloʒban] ( listen)) is a constructed, syntactically unambiguous human language based on predicate logic... The name "Lojban" is a compound formed from loj and ban, which are short forms of logji (logic) and bangu (language)... The main sources of its basic vocabulary were the six (at the time [i.e. 1987]) most widely spoken languages: Mandarin, English, Hindi, Spanish, Russian, and Arabic, chosen to reduce the unfamiliarity or strangeness of the root words to people of diverse linguistic backgrounds.
    In this latter goal, it seems to me to have quite failed, at least based on the stuff Ben L posts here. None of them have roots that seem even vaguely familiar. Interlingua may fail more badly for non-Europeans, but I think it comes much closer to achieving its stated goal of being somewhat intelligible to speakers of Romance and educated speakers of other Indoeuropean languages than Lojban does to being not-strange to everyone.



  • @aapis said:

    @gramie said:
    On the surface it's funny, but you do know that the Bible was originally written in Hebrew (Old Testament) and Greek (New Testament), right? And someone had to translate it. Have a Bible signed by the translator isn't WTF at all.

    Um, yes it is. Who the hell would value the signature of a Bible translator? The whole point of signing something is that you have the smallest connection to someone, usually famous, who matters to you.

    Which is why I suggested it might have been signed by the author of a commentary or study guide included in that Bible. Often these are written by people who are well-known by the people who would be shopping for a Bible.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @Wikipedia said:
    Lojban (pronounced locally: [ˈloʒban] ( listen)) is a constructed, syntactically unambiguous human language based on predicate logic... The name "Lojban" is a compound formed from loj and ban, which are short forms of logji (logic) and bangu (language)... The main sources of its basic vocabulary were the six (at the time [i.e. 1987]) most widely spoken languages: Mandarin, English, Hindi, Spanish, Russian, and Arabic, chosen to reduce the unfamiliarity or strangeness of the root words to people of diverse linguistic backgrounds.
    In this latter goal, it seems to me to have quite failed, at least based on the stuff Ben L posts here. None of them have roots that seem even vaguely familiar. Interlingua may fail more badly for non-Europeans, but I think it comes much closer to achieving its stated goal of being somewhat intelligible to speakers of Romance and educated speakers of other Indoeuropean languages than Lojban does to being not-strange to everyone.
    Ah, so it's like Interlingua or Esperanto.

    Oh god, Ben L is like Arnold Rimmer, trying to pass his engineering exam and learn Esperanto at the same time.



  • @drurowin said:

    @HardwareGeek said:
    @Wikipedia said:
    Lojban (pronounced locally: [ˈloʒban] ( listen)) is a constructed, syntactically unambiguous human language based on predicate logic... The name "Lojban" is a compound formed from loj and ban, which are short forms of logji (logic) and bangu (language)... The main sources of its basic vocabulary were the six (at the time [i.e. 1987]) most widely spoken languages: Mandarin, English, Hindi, Spanish, Russian, and Arabic, chosen to reduce the unfamiliarity or strangeness of the root words to people of diverse linguistic backgrounds.
    In this latter goal, it seems to me to have quite failed, at least based on the stuff Ben L posts here. None of them have roots that seem even vaguely familiar. Interlingua may fail more badly for non-Europeans, but I think it comes much closer to achieving its stated goal of being somewhat intelligible to speakers of Romance and educated speakers of other Indoeuropean languages than Lojban does to being not-strange to everyone.
    Ah, so it's like Interlingua or Esperanto.

    It's worse as those two are trying to invent a language that works like other natural languages. Lojban's main design is that it is supposed to be a logical language, that is one where you can't make ambiguous or illogical statements while being grammatically correct.



  • @locallunatic said:

    @drurowin said:
    Ah, so it's like Interlingua or Esperanto.

    It's worse as those two are trying to invent a language that works like other natural languages. Lojban's main design is that it is supposed to be a logical language, that is one where you can't make ambiguous or illogical statements while being grammatically correct.
    Also, you can install Debian in Esperanto, but not Loglan Lojban or Interlingua.



  • @locallunatic said:

    It's worse as those two are trying to invent a language that works like other natural languages. Lojban's main design is that it is supposed to be a logical language, that is one where you can't make ambiguous or illogical statements while being grammatically correct.
    Also, I'm looking at a literal translation of the lists of common phrases on Wikipedia, and all that comes to mind is Mr. Saturn from Mother 2. Needs more "Boing" and "Zoom" though.



  • Oh god, the examples on Wikipedia!

    "le ninmu cu nanmu" - "That chick's really a dude!"



  • @locallunatic said:

    Lojban's main design is that it is supposed to be a logical language, that is one where you can't make ambiguous or illogical statements
    That would destroy TDWTF. @locallunatic said:
    while being grammatically correct.
    A grammar Nazi's dream: Correct posters' logical fallacies by correcting their grammar.



  • @Ben L. said:

    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Guess what: I think it also means "I am a virgin".



  • @drurowin said:

    Oh god, the examples on Wikipedia!

    "le ninmu cu nanmu" - "That chick's really a dude!"

    Oh God.. Oh God.. can't breath..



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Ben L. said:
    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Guess what: I think it also means "I am a virgin".

    No, for that you'd say "mi nu'ogle".



  • @Ben L. said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    @Ben L. said:
    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Guess what: I think it also means "I am a virgin".

    No, for that you'd say "mi nu'ogle".

    What's lojban for "whooosh"?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @morbiuswilters said:
    @Ben L. said:
    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Guess what: I think it also means "I am a virgin".

    No, for that you'd say "mi nu'ogle".

    What's lojban for "whooosh"?

    do jmisre .i mi sezga'o .i.ku'i mi jimpe fi le la .morbi,ys. xamsku



  • @Ben L. said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    @Ben L. said:
    @morbiuswilters said:
    @Ben L. said:
    No, but we have one word for "x1 is a virgin": nu'ogle. Pronounced "new hoe gleh".

    Guess what: I think it also means "I am a virgin".

    No, for that you'd say "mi nu'ogle".

    What's lojban for "whooosh"?

    do jmisre .i mi sezga'o .i.ku'i mi jimpe fi le la .morbi,ys. xamsku

    You shot who in the what-now?



  • @Ben L. said:

    sezga'o

    A lojban word for "autistic" seems kind of pointless.



  • @Ben L. said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    What's lojban for "whooosh"?

    do jmisre .i mi sezga'o .i.ku'i mi jimpe fi le la .morbi,ys. xamsku
    Either lojban is ridiculously verbose at expressing a concept that can be expressed in a single word in English, or you just told off ".morbi,ys." If you expect us (or me, at any rate) to translate it one word at a time by following those links in order to find out which, well, what's lojban for "fuhgeddaboudit!"?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Ben L. said:
    sezga'o

    A lojban word for "autistic" seems kind of pointless.

    Self-referential



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    @Ben L. said:
    sezga'o

    A lojban word for "autistic" seems kind of pointless.

    Self-referential

    But redundant; I'm sure they already have a word for "person who speaks lojban."



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ben L. said:
    @morbiuswilters said:
    What's lojban for "whooosh"?

    do jmisre .i mi sezga'o .i.ku'i mi jimpe fi le la .morbi,ys. xamsku
    Either lojban is ridiculously verbose at expressing a concept that can be expressed in a single word in English, or you just told off ".morbi,ys." If you expect us (or me, at any rate) to translate it one word at a time by following those links in order to find out which, well, what's lojban for "fuhgeddaboudit!"?

    I followed every link, and I still don't know what he was trying to say. "Unambiguous" my ass..



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I followed every link, and I still don't know what he was trying to say. "Unambiguous" my ass..
    (listeners/audience) (misunderstand/misinterpret) (useless linking word) (me/my (in this case, Ben L's)) (autism) (useless linking word) (in contrast) (me/my, again Ben L's) (future perfect tense of comprehend) (nonsense word) (the one known as) (proper name form of the one known as) (probably bastardised spelling of Morbius) (performing arts)

    I'd guess it means
    @Ben L. said:

    I may be fucking autistic, but damned if I don't think Morbs is the funniest user on here.

    From what I can tell of the language, he's using about 30% more words than he needs to.


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