I need help to blu ray my very frustrating situation ?



  • Help! Hooking up TV stereo cable box Apple TV and blu ray
    I have a very frustrating situation I need help with. I have a LN40B500P3f tv. Motorola cable box. Apple TV. A blu ray play with HDMI only. And a HTS3544/37 all in one stereo receiver/DVD player.
    Currently I am able to get sound from my cable box through my stereo. I am not however able to get sound from my Apple TV or blu ray to come out of my stereo speakers.
    My stereo receiver only has one hdmi port. The cable box is hooked up to that. This is obviously why the sound works. I then have my Apple TV and blu ray hooked to the back of my tv. Video works fine but no audio.
    I'm no expert but logic tells me that if I take a digital audio cable from the out on my tv and use a converter to the digital coaxial cable in on the back of the stereo this would fix my problem.
    Best buy is telling me that this will not work. They say that I need to get a new receiver that has multiple hdmi ports and hook up all my devices to this in order to get sounds from them. They say there is no way to do this with them hooked up to the tv.
    HELP!



  • Re: I need help to blu ray my very frustrating situation ?

    Plug one end of this into your TV's headphone socket, and the other end into an audio input on the back of your receiver.



  • Re: I need help to blu ray my very frustrating situation ?

    It's been four months and you haven't found a solution. Maybe you should give up.

    On life.

    Disclaimer: This is obviously spam.



  • Re: I need help to blu ray my very frustrating situation ?

    Get your BluRay camera, get your very frustrating situation, get some actors to reenact it for you, record. Congratulations, you have just blu-rayed your very frustrating situation.



  •  



  • @flabdablet said:

    Plug one end of this into your TV's headphone socket, and the other end into an audio input on the back of your receiver.

    My TV has optical audio out and my stereo receiver has the appropriate inputs. I actually used the old optical cable from my original Xbox. Better sound quality and possibility of surround sound.



  • The fuck kind of spam is this? What is he/she/it trying to sell? I'm completely fucking lost on this one.



  • Re: I need help to blu ray my very frustrating situation ?

    According to the manuals it will most certainly work. However, when you go in to the TV with an HDMI you won't get 5.1 surround at the Toslink output. You'll get only 2-channel stereo.

    I agree with Rick I kind of have the same situation you have only I have two HDMI connectors on my set but had three things that were going to use HDMI ports. One of those things was my Blu Ray player the other a DVD recorder and lastly a desktop computer I use for Netflix and other online video.
    So I finally bought one of those adapters and and it does work however be aware that the remote doesn't always work. This looks like it has auto switching but also be aware that doesn't always work. Most of the time it does but you can't have several devices on at once so turn the others off. You will also need to get more HDMI connection cords to hook it up which is cheaper online.
    If you need a converter, the converter I use is really good. It is named Pavtube. The conversion speed is fast and the output quality is really good. It does a favor for me. Hope it can help you as well.



  • Is this real life?



  • I have read posts about EM but I didnt understand if you can just buy a bottle of it? How do you buy it? I take regular healthfood store types.



  • @flabdablet said:

    I have read posts about erectile menstruation but I didnt understand if you can just buy a bottle of it? How do you buy it? I take regular healthfood store types.

    EMTFY



  • The good news is these guys have a GetSatisfaction page. Not going to link to it here, but yknow.



  • @jmap said:

    Not going to link to it here, but yknow.

    I will.



  • @jmap said:

    The good news is these guys have a GetSatisfaction page. Not going to link to it here, but yknow.

    Does that mean we can challenge them to a pistol duel?



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    Filed under:  there's also a rolling stones joke here but I don't dare to make it

    class MickJagger {

    public Satisfaction GetSatisfaction() {
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
    }

    }

    class AdamLevineMoves extends Moves {

    public boolean equals(Object other){
        if( other instanceof MickJaggerMoves ){
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
    

    }

     



  • @Zemm said:

    Better sound quality and possibility of surround sound.
    Optical (and copper SPDIF) only allows for uncompressed stereo audio. If you want 5.1, it has to be compressed to AC3 or DTS.



  • Why are some people still answering the question as if it's genuine?



  • @skotl said:

    Why are some people still answering the question as if it's genuine?
    Because Google is now run by (unknown)




  •  Why do I answer a rethorical question?



  • @TGV said:

     Why do I answer a rethorical question?

    How many Community Server developers does it take to answer a rhetorical question?

     



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @TGV said:

     Why do I answer a rethorical question?

    How many Community Server developers does it take to answer a rhetorical question?
     

    Hahahahhaah-- Community Server had developers. That's funny.

     



  • Sometimes it's better to knock out small defects by hand because you can exert a lot of foruce with just a couple of fingers to an applicator pad.



  • @ender said:

    @Zemm said:
    Better sound quality and possibility of surround sound.
    Optical (and copper SPDIF) only allows for uncompressed stereo audio. If you want 5.1, it has to be compressed to AC3 or DTS.
     

    My receiver can do DTS. It might be getting on (I bought it circa 2004, it can switch S-video and composite but not HDMI) but I have gotten DTS out of it from a DVD and I'm sure I got surround via SPDIF – unless I was imagining the back speakers working independantly from the front? I guess it all depends on the source.

    I haven't had the opportunity to try using HDMI via the TV though, since we got the TV (as a gift) after our son figured out how to pull on cables. Now it has the minimum number of cables to function and the receiver is mostly unplugged and we use the internal TV speakers.

     



  • You know your spambot sucks when you need to create additional spambots to talk to it.



  • @Master Chief said:

    You know your spambot sucks when you need to create additional spambots to talk to it.
     

    That reply was probably from a bored forum user, it's directly copied from the original page. Propably the same bored user who made the first post...



  • Re: I need help to blu ray my very frustrating situation ?

    Ya know, I've never had any of these strange DRM problems when I've downloaded hi-def movies in MP4 or MKV format.



  • @anotherusername said:

    Ya know, I've never had any of these strange DRM problems when I've downloaded hi-def movies in MP4 or MKV format.
    Yes, I've noticed that movies which have had the DRM removed no longer have any DRM in them.  Weird, huh?



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @anotherusername said:

    Ya know, I've never had any of these strange DRM problems when I've downloaded hi-def movies in MP4 or MKV format.
    Yes, I've noticed that movies which have had the DRM removed no longer have any DRM in them.  Weird, huh?

    Weirder still that people tolerate the DRM in the first place.



  • @anotherusername said:

    @El_Heffe said:

    @anotherusername said:

    Ya know, I've never had any of these strange DRM problems when I've downloaded hi-def movies in MP4 or MKV format.
    Yes, I've noticed that movies which have had the DRM removed no longer have any DRM in them.  Weird, huh?

    Weirder still that people tolerate the DRM in the first place.

    When it's done properly, you never know it's there. It just keeps being done poorly.



  • @Master Chief said:

    @anotherusername said:
    @El_Heffe said:

    @anotherusername said:

    Ya know, I've never had any of these strange DRM problems when I've downloaded hi-def movies in MP4 or MKV format.
    Yes, I've noticed that movies which have had the DRM removed no longer have any DRM in them.  Weird, huh?

    Weirder still that people tolerate the DRM in the first place.

    When it's done properly, you never know it's there. It just keeps being done poorly.
    The only good DRM is dead DRM. What you describe -- 100% accurate DRM (zero false positives, zero false negatives) -- simply can't be done.



  • @Master Chief said:

    When it's done properly, you never know it's there. It just keeps being done poorly.
     

    Only a true Scottsman can do DRM properly.

    In all serious-- how exactly can DRM be done properly.  Describe a system with no false positives, no false negatives, no downtime, that both perfectly accounts for all fair use clauses (including timeshifting, multiple device usage, personal backups, resale) AND rights managemet (copy limitations, no mass distribution, etc, etc) without one interfering with the other-- that doesn't introduce (significantly) degraded performance or startup time, can work without an online connection, and will allow continual usage of the content even after the distributor and/or DRM company go out of business or discontinue the DRM.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @Master Chief said:
    When it's done properly, you never know it's there. It just keeps being done poorly.
     

    Only a true Scottsman can do DRM properly.

    In all serious-- how exactly can DRM be done properly.

    It depends on your definition of 'done properly'. If you insist on fair use being considered then no, it can't be 'done properly'. However, the people creating DRM have absolutely no concern for fair use. The 'RM' means 'Rights Management' and that is the only thing they care about.

     



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    @Master Chief said:
    When it's done properly, you never know it's there. It just keeps being done poorly.
     

    Only a true Scottsman can do DRM properly.

    In all serious-- how exactly can DRM be done properly.

    It depends on your definition of 'done properly'. If you insist on fair use being considered then no, it can't be 'done properly'. However, the people creating DRM have absolutely no concern for fair use. The 'RM' means 'Rights Management' and that is the only thing they care about.

     


    I haven't seen any complaints about Steam's DRM.



  • @anotherusername said:

    @Master Chief said:
    @anotherusername said:
    @El_Heffe said:

    @anotherusername said:

    Ya know, I've never had any of these strange DRM problems when I've downloaded hi-def movies in MP4 or MKV format.
    Yes, I've noticed that movies which have had the DRM removed no longer have any DRM in them.  Weird, huh?

    Weirder still that people tolerate the DRM in the first place.

    When it's done properly, you never know it's there. It just keeps being done poorly.
    The only good DRM is dead DRM. What you describe -- 100% accurate DRM (zero false positives, zero false negatives) -- simply can't be done.

    I wrote something about this awhile back. Don't have it front of me, but the big points were:



    Reasonable Price - If you charge an arm and a leg for a product that can so easily be obtained illegitimately, you will lose sales, promised. If you must charge a premium for given content, make it worth the while (extra content, gifts, etc. for buyers)

    Err on the side of the User - If you assume your customers are criminals and force them to prove otherwise to use the product, you have failed. You will gain nothing but poor PR and a bad reputation as a content distributor. Secondly; if you can't verify authenticity because of outside problems (no internet, server offline, etc.) you can't just lock up whatever you've sold until conditions improve. People have paid for a product; SNES games I pull out of my closet still work in 2014, there's no reason my digital movies shouldn't work in 2024.

    No Codes, no restrictions, no nonsense - If I bought a movie, I should be able to watch it on my PC, on my blu ray player, on my XBox, on my iPad, or on my Android Phone, or all at the same time if I really want to. As long as all the backend accounts are mine, there is no reason I shouldn't be able to. I've purchased the product; I should be entitled to use it as I see fit, excluding outright copying and distribution.



  • @Master Chief said:

    I wrote something about this awhile back. Don't have it front of me, but the big points were:



    Reasonable Price - If you charge an arm and a leg for a product that can so easily be obtained illegitimately, you will lose sales, promised. If you must charge a premium for given content, make it worth the while (extra content, gifts, etc. for buyers)

    Err on the side of the User - If you assume your customers are criminals and force them to prove otherwise to use the product, you have failed. You will gain nothing but poor PR and a bad reputation as a content distributor. Secondly; if you can't verify authenticity because of outside problems (no internet, server offline, etc.) you can't just lock up whatever you've sold until conditions improve. People have paid for a product; SNES games I pull out of my closet still work in 2014, there's no reason my digital movies shouldn't work in 2024.

    No Codes, no restrictions, no nonsense - If I bought a movie, I should be able to watch it on my PC, on my blu ray player, on my XBox, on my iPad, or on my Android Phone, or all at the same time if I really want to. As long as all the backend accounts are mine, there is no reason I shouldn't be able to. I've purchased the product; I should be entitled to use it as I see fit, excluding outright copying and distribution.

    When you put all of that together, it basically means that it will be trivially easy to remove your copy protection, and your entire hope of protecting your content hinges on the question of whether it'll be so cheap that it's not worth the trouble of copying it. Which brings me back to my original point... you might as well just skip the DRM.



  • @anotherusername said:

    @Master Chief said:
    I wrote something about this awhile back. Don't have it front of me, but the big points were:



    Reasonable Price - If you charge an arm and a leg for a product that can so easily be obtained illegitimately, you will lose sales, promised. If you must charge a premium for given content, make it worth the while (extra content, gifts, etc. for buyers)

    Err on the side of the User - If you assume your customers are criminals and force them to prove otherwise to use the product, you have failed. You will gain nothing but poor PR and a bad reputation as a content distributor. Secondly; if you can't verify authenticity because of outside problems (no internet, server offline, etc.) you can't just lock up whatever you've sold until conditions improve. People have paid for a product; SNES games I pull out of my closet still work in 2014, there's no reason my digital movies shouldn't work in 2024.

    No Codes, no restrictions, no nonsense - If I bought a movie, I should be able to watch it on my PC, on my blu ray player, on my XBox, on my iPad, or on my Android Phone, or all at the same time if I really want to. As long as all the backend accounts are mine, there is no reason I shouldn't be able to. I've purchased the product; I should be entitled to use it as I see fit, excluding outright copying and distribution.

    When you put all of that together, it basically means that it will be trivially easy to remove your copy protection, and your entire hope of protecting your content hinges on the question of whether it'll be so cheap that it's not worth the trouble of copying it. Which brings me back to my original point... you might as well just skip the DRM.

    @Gabe Newell said:

    Digital Rights Management (DRM) is a sensitive issue. Many games have been the subject of boycotts due to a draconian use of DRM. The most extreme DRM forces players to be online, and to stay online, if they wish to play the game. What are your views on DRM?

    In general, we think there is a fundamental misconception about piracy. Piracy is almost always a service problem and not a pricing problem. For example, if a pirate offers a product anywhere in the world, 24 x 7, purchasable from the convenience of your personal computer, and the legal provider says the product is region-locked, will come to your country 3 months after the US release, and can only be purchased at a brick and mortar store, then the pirate's service is more valuable. Most DRM solutions diminish the value of the product by either directly restricting a customers use or by creating uncertainty.

    Our goal is to create greater service value than pirates, and this has been successful enough for us that piracy is basically a non-issue for our company. For example, prior to entering the Russian market, we were told that Russia was a waste of time because everyone would pirate our products. Russia is now about to become our largest market in Europe.



  • @Master Chief said:

    If you assume your customers are criminals and force them to prove otherwise to use the product, you have failed.

    On my way to work I like to stop at a supermarket and pick up something like bread to go with my lunch or an iced coffee. I have a choice of the great Australian duopoly: Coles and Woolworths. Woolworths has asked to check my bag every time I go there but Coles never does. Guess which one has completely lost my business, even when I'm not wearing a bag!



  • @Zemm said:

    Woolworths has asked to check my bag every time I go there but Coles never does.

    They check your bag...? Is that a normal thing in Australia? I've never had someone ask to search my bag other than at an airport, and my reaction would be to turn around and walk straight back out the door I came in.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    The 'RM' means 'Rights Management' and that is the only thing they care about.
    This is wrong actually - they're perfectly aware that any DRM scheme will be cracked. What they actually care about is putting restrictions not on the media, but on the playback devices - you cannot obtain the DRM keys without agreeing to certain limitations (and I'm not talking about "don't allow user to copy decrypted data") - if there was DRM on CDs, we'd most likely never be able to get various MP3 players for example.



  • @jmap said:

    I've never had someone ask to search my bag other than at an airport, and my reaction would be to turn around and walk straight back out the door I came in.
    If it's what I think it is, it's when you're doing exactly that, that they ask to search your bags. To make sure you're not shoplifting.



  • @Ben L. said:

    I haven't seen any complaints about Steam's DRM.

    I've complained about Steam's DRM several times. But nobody ever listens to me.



  • @PJH said:

    @jmap said:
    I've never had someone ask to search my bag other than at an airport, and my reaction would be to turn around and walk straight back out the door I came in.
    If it's what I think it is, it's when you're doing exactly that, that they ask to search your bags. To make sure you're not shoplifting.

    It is Australia, where everyone is a criminal! At least Coles doesn't think so. (It is on the way out so if you just walked out they'd probably call security) but Woolworths even checks bags even when paying for "other" items.



  • @anonymous234 said:

    Filed under: family sharing my ass,
    Your family is sick.



  • @Zemm said:

    It is Australia, where everyone is a criminal! At least Coles doesn't think so. (It is on the way out so if you just walked out they'd probably call security) but Woolworths even checks bags even when paying for "other" items.

    The Coles nearest to us (Toombul for those who care) doesn't seem to routinely search bags. The most likely candidates seem to be places like Target and Big W. I do think that if you are going to search people's bags you're better off doing it for everyone to avoid those you select randomly (or "randomly") from getting annoyed at being singled out.


    A colleague and I once set off the alarm at David Jones on the way out one lunchtime. DJs a fairly up-market department store and we were in shirts and ties. We stood around for 30 seconds to see if anyone was going to check us out but no-one did so we walked off. This story was brought to you by the "Cool Story Bro" department of The Daily WTF.



  • @RTapeLoadingError said:


    A colleague and I once set off the alarm at David Jones on the way out one lunchtime. DJs a fairly up-market department store and we were in shirts and ties. We stood around for 30 seconds to see if anyone was going to check us out but no-one did so we walked off. This story was brought to you by the "Cool Story Bro" department of The Daily WTF.

    This has been my experience literally every time I've set off an alarm going out of a shop in the UK (even with games, computers, large amounts of shopping etc (that I have paid for, if there was any doubt)).

    And it's not like we don't have shoplifters in the UK. Either I look like a fine upstanding gentleman (except I nearly always get "randomly selected" for the extra naked-cam screening at airports, get my bags searched etc) or UK shops, like the rest of the country, have so much CCTV they rely on that rather than alarms to catch shoplifters.



  • @RTapeLoadingError said:

    A colleague and I once set off the alarm at David Jones on the way out one lunchtime. DJs a fairly up-market department store and we were in shirts and ties. We stood around for 30 seconds to see if anyone was going to check us out but no-one did so we walked off. This story was brought to you by the "Cool Story Bro" department of The Daily WTF.
    I once set off an alarm going into a store (Target).  A security guard came over and was a bit confused since I was walking in, not out.  It turned out that I had some postage stamps in my pocket that I had just purchased from a
    vending machine at the Post Office.  Apparently there was something in
    the packaging.  Weird.



  • Re: I need help to blu ray my very frustrating situation ?

    A misconfigured Apple TV can result in a device with no sound. By default, most of the Audio & Video settings are set to Auto and for the majority of users this works fine. However, some of the auto setting can be the source of the no audio problem. The first method I try for any Apple TV issue is to reset the device (Hold the Play & Menu button simultaneously on the remote for 6 seconds). Sometimes a reset will do the trick. Continue reading for the most common fixes of the no audio issue for the Apple TV:

    Apple TV No Audio Fix
    Go to Settings > Audio & Video
    [img]http://appletv2.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/border-apple-airplay.jpg[/img]

    In the Audio & Video setting, turn off ‘Dolby Digital’
    [img]http://appletv2.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/appletv-no-audio-1.jpg[/img]
    Test the audio. Continue reading if the problem still persists.

    Go to Settings > Audio & Video > TV Resolution and change the resolution to ’1080p HD – 50Hz’

    [img]http://appletv2.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/appletv-no-audio-3.jpg[/img]
    Test the audio. Continue reading if the problem still persists.

    Go to Settings > Audio & Video > Audio Output and change the output to ’16 bit’

    [img]http://appletv2.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/appletv-no-audio-2.jpg[/img]
    Test the audio.



  • Thanks for your help guys. You showed me a great inexpensive work around. I decided to take a slightly different approach. Lol

    My stereo wasn't great to begin with. Best buy had a $500 Yamaha receiver on sale for 200 due to the fact that it had a small scratch on the side. It was even unused. The geek squad scratched it on install. I also bought new speakers and a Logitech harmony remote.

    Everything looks and sounds great and better yet it is controlled by one remote.

    Thanks again.



  • @Zemm said:

    It is Australia, where everyone is a criminal!
    Not everyone; the natives weren't.



  • @EmilyAmada said:

    <img src="http://appletv2.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/border-apple-airplay.jpg" border="0" width="200px;>

    You might have bigger problems when the menu starts to melt.


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