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    Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2014 07:53:24 +0700 (ICT)
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    <html><head><style> body {height: 100%; color:#000000; font-size:12pt; font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;}</style></head><body><br><br><br>-- <br><div>Your account size has reached 970.54MB, which is over 90%</div><div>of your 1024.00MB quota. Please click on the link below to <br></div>exceeding your quota.<br><br><a href="http://cluspets.com/verify/">https://zimbra.verification.edu/</a><br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp; <br>&nbsp;
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    Let's dig a bit deeper, shall we?

    Whois Server Version 2.0
    
    [...]
    
    Registry Registrant ID: DI_33686065
    Registrant Name: West Kelly
    Registrant Organization: clupets
    Registrant Street: 1 airport road   
    Registrant City: benin
    Registrant State/Province: edo
    Registrant Postal Code: 234
    Registrant Country: NG
    Registrant Phone: +234.08076745219
    Registrant Phone Ext: 
    Registrant Fax: 
    Registrant Fax Ext: 
    Registrant Email: bernar_eric@outlook.com
    Registry Admin ID: DI_33686065
    Admin Name: West Kelly
    Admin Organization: clupets
    Admin Street: 1 airport road  
    Admin City: benin
    Admin State/Province: edo
    Admin Postal Code: 234
    Admin Country: NG
    Admin Phone: +234.08076745219
    Admin Phone Ext: 
    Admin Fax: 
    Admin Fax Ext: 
    Admin Email: bernar_eric@outlook.com
    

    Okay, just to summarize:

    • A nigerian registers a domain 7 days ago while standing at the end of a road with a single airport on it.
    • They then fly to vietnam and send me an email.
    • The email tells me that I need to sign in to my email, but gives two different error pages (one NXDOMAIN, one 404) instead of actually trying to phish me.
    • My university's email servers do not mark the email as spam (simply adding a header that says "nope, we checked this for spam"), instead choosing to forward it (because it's important!) to my main address.
    • Nigeria has space for 100 billion phone numbers, just in case the world population increases by an order of magnitude and then everyone moves to Nigeria overnight.
    • Please click on the link below to exceeding your quota.


  • @Ben L. said:

    A nigerian registers a domain 7 days ago while standing at the end of a road with a single airport on it.
    Based on the address, I would say that he was at the beginning of the road. @Ben L. said:
    The email tells me that I need to sign in to my email, but gives two different error pages instead of actually trying to phish me.
    Nobody ever said Nigerians were competent.@Ben L. said:
    Please click on the link below to exceeding your quota.
    He forgot to add 'thank you very much'.



  • @Ben L. said:

  • Nigeria has space for 100 billion phone numbers, just in case the world population increases by an order of magnitude and then everyone moves to Nigeria overnight.

    • +234 - dialling code
    • 080 - likely an area code (for area number 80)
    • 76745219 - 100 million numbers for that area (obviously more than the population but one area with more than 10 million people not all that unlikely)

    But yeah, these 419ers never seem to get any better



  • @jmap said:

    @Ben L. said:
  • Nigeria has space for 100 billion phone numbers, just in case the world population increases by an order of magnitude and then everyone moves to Nigeria overnight.

    • +234 - dialling code
    • 080 - likely an area code (for area number 80)
    • 76745219 - 100 million numbers for that area (obviously more than the population but one area with more than 10 million people not all that unlikely)

    I happen to be a bit of a telephony nerd. I don't know about other countries but here in The Netherlands (pop. 17 million), our phone numbers are normally 10 digits. There are exceptions with fewer and more digits, but they are a vast minority since they are used by businesses and governments, and generally only large enterprises don't use 10 digit numbers. Also, all non-10-digit numbers are either forwarded to a 10-digit number, or point to a PBX that has at least one 10-digit number. There are no exceptions.

    What comes next only applies to 10 digit numbers.

    • All 10 digit numbers start with a zero.
    • The second digit can't be 8 or 9 or it's not a 10 digit number. (Dutch pedantic dickweeds will note the geographical thing but those are very rare and only the pedantic dickweeds themselves use those anyway.)
    • The second digit also can't be a zero, because in the Dutch number plan, dialling two zeroes means you want to dial an international number.
    • Then you get a 6 or some other digit.
    • If the second digit is a 6 then it's a mobile number.
    • Otherwise, it's an area code. Major cities and larger towns have three digit area codes, smaller towns and villages have four digit area codes; I'm including the leading zero in these digits.
    • Because the area code can be three or four digits, the number space is reduced.
    • After the 06 or the area code comes the subscriber number.

    In the first three steps, 93% of the number space is gone. A pretty big chunk of the remaining number space is taken up by the area codes. But there is also a lot of redundancy in the subscriber number space.

    In mobile numbers (I'm not an expert on those but I think what I'm about to say is accurate) the first two digits are reserved to identify the carrier. Not all hundred permutations are used, not by a long shot. I'd be surprised if it were as many as ten. In land-line numbers only the first digit is used to identify the carrier. There are very few carriers large enough to have a leading digit allocated to them. Probably like three or four, if that many. Also, in land lines the carriers tend to have their own little sub number plan, with large series of numbers from hundreds up to tens of thousands assigned to PBX's. All of this slashes the number space even further.

    In mobile phone numbers you've also got your MSN numbers. When your mobile phone talks to a tower, it gets a temporary phone number known as an MSN number. This number belongs to a land line with a mobile phone number, which is used to connect your calls. The tower maps the calls to and from the MSN number to your mobile phone. You and the person you're calling are none the wiser, but the numbers exists and they take up space. I have no clue how many of those there are at any given moment (they are used as needed) because again, I know a lot about land lines, not an expert on mobile numbers.

    Finally, the subscriber numbers need a minimum distance so they are not too easily guessed. In theory, therefore, there are 1010 Dutch ten digit numbers, but the actual number space cardinality is probably a lot less than 108.

    One last note of pedantic dickweedery: you can have your number ported to a different carrier. Say I get a phone number from UPC, then I can "move" it to KPN. That may be true but it has no effect on either the number space or the number plan. My number was, many eons ago when the Number Gods created the numbers, allocated to UPC when the number series was allocated, and that doesn't change.



  • @toon said:

    MSN number
    Mobile... Something... Number?



  • I’m guessing Multiple Subscriber Number.



  • @Zecc said:

    @toon said:

    MSN number
    Mobile... Something... Number?

    @Gurth said:

    I’m guessing Multiple Subscriber Number.

    What he said ^^^



  • @Zecc said:

    @toon said:

    MSN number
    Mobile... Something... Number?


    Microsoft Network Number (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSN).

    Didn't you know that the Netherlands are a Microsoft subsidiary?



  • @derari said:

    @Zecc said:

    @toon said:

    MSN number
    Mobile... Something... Number?

    Microsoft Network Number (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSN). Didn't you know that the Netherlands are a Microsoft subsidiary?

    This is true. In Holland, one can get sued for using Linux. Though there are exceptions for the use of Android on hand-held devices.



  • @toon said:

    I happen to be a bit of a telephony nerd. I don't know about other countries but here in The Netherlands (pop. 17 million), our phone numbers are normally 10 digits.

    I'm also fascinated how different countries organise their telephone numbers. Sounds like the Netherlands is similar to Australia for numbering: 10 digits including the leading 0, a prefix for mobiles (04), specific landline area codes (02, 03, 07, 08) and differing length non-geographic (they all start with a 1 without a 0, except emergency 000 and international access 0011).

    @toon said:

    In the first three steps, 93% of the number space is gone. A pretty big chunk of the remaining number space is taken up by the area codes.

    The initial 0 isn't really part of the number. The Americans get this right by listing their "10 digit number" without it - the initial 1 is the same as most countries' 0.

    So for the current Australian plan there can only be 320,000,000 landline numbers (first digit of a landline must be 2-9: four area codes with 8-digit local numbers) and 100,000,000 mobile numbers (no restrictions on digits after the 04). In reality most prefixes are not allocated. [ref]. There are a few numbers beginning with 01 (0198 data numbers and 014 satellite numbers; 016 pagers are no longer and most of 014-019 were AMPS (9 digits including the leading 0) before ~2000) and there is planning to avoid collisions with internationally-diallable 13 and 18 numbers.

    Prior to about 1997 there were some confusing features of the numbering plan: there were area codes 002, 003 and 004. These were dialled from overseas as +6102, +6103 and +6104 which could have been confused with Sydney's 02 area code international +612 (And Melbourne 03 and then-greater-Sydney 04x). However "(002) abc def" became "(03) 62ab cdef" - "(04x) abc def" became "(02) 4xab cdef" except for GSM mobile phones which were already "041a bcd efg" - since 1997 all of 04 has been reserved for mobile phones. Sydney's local numbers got a 9 at the beginning so they could share with the rest of NSW and ACT. Brisbane used to have the area code 07 with seven digit local numbers beginning with 2, 3 or 8 as there were area codes 070, 071, 074, etc. "(07)" became "(07) 3" and "(07a)" became "(07) za" - z is 5 where a is 4 or 5, z is 4 otherwise. Of course since this renumbering there's new numbers like Sydney's "(02) 8" to go with "(02) 9" and Gold Coast's "(07) 56" to go with "(07) 55". There's even a plan to expand mobile numbering into the 05 prefix.

    @toon said:

    In mobile phone numbers you've also got your MSN numbers

    I haven't heard of those. I thought a MSN was like an IMEI? And didn't change? AFAICT the numbering used for routing between mobile towers are outside the normal numbering, and are world-unique but use a network prefix separate from the country prefix.

    @toon said:

    Finally, the subscriber numbers need a minimum distance so they are not too easily guessed.

    Really? Where I used to live we had neighbours with the same phone number and only one digit different. We were a bit rural and the exchange only had 1000 numbers associated with it. Having a check digit would be good but bloat out the numbers a bit.

    @toon said:

    One last note of pedantic dickweedery: you can have your number ported to a different carrier. Say I get a phone number from UPC, then I can "move" it to KPN.

    Yeah I've done that. Got a number that looks like Optus but it's on the Telstra network. Funny thing was I started on Telstra in 1999 but moved to Optus in 2001 but had to change numbers to do that. And my current number was first allocated to Optus in 1992: the very first block of numbers allocated for GSM mobile phones. Landline number portability sort-of works, but as Telstra has a monopolistic stranglehold on communications they usually lease numbers rather than fully port them. I'd drop my landline if I didn't need it for DSL.

    @toon said:

    In theory, therefore, there are 1010 Dutch ten digit numbers, but the actual number space cardinality is probably a lot less than 108.

    No, there are 109 Dutch ten digit numbers, minus 4 × 108 for international, mobile and special numbers, minus some more for restrictions like not starting local numbers with certain digits.

    @Ben L. said:

    Nigeria has space for 100 billion phone numbers, just in case the world population increases by an order of magnitude and then everyone moves to Nigeria overnight.

    • +234 - dialling code
    • 080 - likely an area code (for area number 80)
    • 76745219 - 100 million numbers for that area (obviously more than the population but one area with more than 10 million people not all that unlikely)

    0807 is the prefix for Globacom mobile phone. I'm guessing the initial 0 was a mistake where people don't understand "trunk prefixes".

    Having spare numbers is a good thing, as it will limit renumbering. Look at the NANP: it's almost perfect and terrible at the same time. Also Australia has ~20M population, so why do we need more than 100M mobile phone numbers? (All those 3/4G iPads, mifi devices, etc, all need their own numbers!)



  • I'd be more likely to click the link if the email looked like this:

    Wow,
    
    Very data!
    Such quota!
    Much exceeding!
    So linking!
    
    https://zimbra.verification.edu/
    


  • How the fuck does anybody there make a phone call?

    How does that idiot system cope with the fact that area codes are entirely pointless, and *all* phones are mobiles? Oh wait, lemme guess: you guys don't have number portability yet?



  • @derari said:

    @Zecc said:

    @toon said:

    MSN number
    Mobile... Something... Number?


    Microsoft Network Number (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSN).

    Didn't you know that the Netherlands are a Microsoft subsidiary?

     

    Has to be something else, or it would be spelled M$N-- OH SICK BURN ON MICRO (little) $OFT (flacid)  !!!!

     





  • @Zemm said:

    Where I used to live we had neighbours with the same phone number and only one digit different.
    My grandparents' have a phone number number that differs only in the last digit from one of my friends' number - but he lives halfway across the town.



  • @ender said:

    @Zemm said:
    Where I used to live we had neighbours with the same phone number and only one digit different.
    My grandparents' have a phone number number that differs only in the last digit from one of my friends' number - but he lives halfway across the town.
    Years ago I moved into a new house and as soon as I had the phone service turned on I immediately began getting calls from people trying to reach a local exterminator.  I looked up the exterminator in the phone book (probably the only time I've used a phone book in the last 20 years) and found that their phone differed from mine by only one digit, so I just assumed that people were mis-dialing. (I once had a girlfriend who was Miss Dialing 1987, but that's another story).

    After a while it got pretty annoying.  I even changed my answering machine message to include 'If you want  ______ Exterminating, you have the wrong number' but for some reason that had no effect. Every day I would come home from work to find messages detailing various extermination needs.  It was somewhat disturbing to learn that the local highschool had a rat problem in the cafeteria.

    I eventually learned that people weren't mis-dialing. They were simply past customers. For many years the exterminator actually had my phone number and only changed it because the phone company made them.  They were apparently told 'You aren't supposed to have a 323-XXXX phone number, you're in the 324-XXXX exchange.'

    Through a combination of laziness and/or cheapness the exterminator was still giving people invoices with the old (my new) phone number.  Apparently I'm not the only one who never uses phone books -- the correct phone number is listed in their ad in the Yellow Pages -- and people were just using the phone number from their previous invoice. So I just started telling everyone who called that the exterminator had gone out of business and that's why I had the number now.  The calls stopped and I never had any more problems.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    How does that idiot system cope with the fact that area codes are entirely pointless, and all phones are mobiles? Oh wait, lemme guess: you guys don't have number portability yet?

    Number portability between mobile phone companies yes, but not between landline and mobile, as that would completely fool with billing. Can you move house and keep your landline number? Around here it would depend where you move.

    Oh and the NANP is all about area codes. That's an idiot system to e!



  • @El_Heffe said:

    For many years the exterminator actually had my phone number and only changed it because the phone company made them.  They were apparently told 'You aren't supposed to have a 323-XXXX phone number, you're in the 324-XXXX exchange.'

    Did they simply move premises instead of stealing a number? Sounds like a very short quarantine period. My old work moved to a different exchange area (new number) but we kept the old number diverted for over a year. This wasn't free but worth it for catching stragglers.

    When I was reading the story I thought it might have been a different extension number used. A different old work had 16 lines on a hunt group. When calling out it would display one of those numbers. Then we changed phone systems and got new extension numbers. We had some complaints because of this. People had saved the outgoing number into their phone. Note that the advertised number remained the same. Presumably those numbers would be recycled by now as it was c.2005.



  • @Zemm said:

    Number portability between mobile phone companies yes, but not between landline and mobile, as that would completely fool with billing. Can you move house and keep your landline number? Around here it would depend where you move.
    We got mobile number portability first, but it was quickly followed by landline number portability. I've had my landline number ported to VoIP 7 years ago (and I could've easily had it ported to mobile if I wanted that).



  • @ender said:

    ]We got mobile number portability first, but it was quickly followed by landline number portability. I've had my landline number ported to VoIP 7 years ago (and I could've easily had it ported to mobile if I wanted that).

    Unless you are on mobile party pays how does that work? Could 555-0987 be charged differently than 555-0988? This is where many numbering plans fail. There should be an easy way to know how much the number will cost to call before you even pick up the phone. I could port my landline to VoIP if I wanted (could have for years, but I got a different number for VoIP due to using DSL and the requirement of having a connected phone line), but people would look at me weird if I said a number beginning with 07 was my mobile number, unless I said it would divert to my mobile. (We have that for after hours support at my work but currently only the boss uses it as that number is his direct extension number during the day)



  • @Zemm said:

    @ender said:
    ]We got mobile number portability first, but it was quickly followed by landline number portability. I've had my landline number ported to VoIP 7 years ago (and I could've easily had it ported to mobile if I wanted that).

    Unless you are on mobile party pays how does that work? Could 555-0987 be charged differently than 555-0988? This is where many numbering plans fail. There should be an easy way to know how much the number will cost to call before you even pick up the phone. I could port my landline to VoIP if I wanted (could have for years, but I got a different number for VoIP due to using DSL and the requirement of having a connected phone line), but people would look at me weird if I said a number beginning with 07 was my mobile number, unless I said it would divert to my mobile. (We have that for after hours support at my work but currently only the boss uses it as that number is his direct extension number during the day)

    Why should it cost more or less to call a different type of phone?

    Spoiler: it's because the phone companies like money



  • @Ben L. said:

    Why should it cost more or less to call a different type of phone?

    Spoiler: it's because the phone companies like money

    It's less of an issue these days but to provide a wireless phone is more expensive than a wired one. This is also why $60 might get me a few GB of mobile data but unlimited DSL data.

    Long distance is also less of an issue, due to widespread use of VoIP. International on the other hand...

    Should it cost any difference for me to call you, ender, my neighbour or someone using a satellite service? Using Skype at both ends that would all be free, but using traditional phone systems would cost different amounts.



  • Telecommunications companies are the worst thing to ever happen to telecommunications. I think they should just legally limit them to providing IP connectivity at a fixed rate (per GB or per month) and implement everything else on top of it as open protocols.



  • @Zemm said:

    Unless you are on mobile party pays how does that work? Could 555-0987 be charged differently than 555-0988?
    Yes. The operator I currently use for my (VoIP) landline and mobile phone doesn't charge anything for calls within its own network, and charges different rates depending on which network you're calling to (after you used up your alloted minutes). It's possible to turn on a warning that plays before the call is connected, but I don't know anybody who left this on (the warning was mandatory the first few months after number portability was implemented when calling a number that appeared to be in your own network, but was actually ported).


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Zemm said:

    It's less of an issue these days but to provide a wireless phone is more expensive than a wired one.
    The additional costs can be either borne by the caller or the callee. Think of it this way: in North America, one pays to receive marketing cold calls while you're in the middle of taking a shower.@Zemm said:
    International on the other hand...
    There are firms that specialise in that, buying up chunks of capacity and reselling it. Classic middle-man behaviour that happens to still be profitable.



  • @dkf said:

    Think of it this way: in North America, one pays to receive marketing cold calls while you're in the middle of taking a shower.

    But if you're not taking a shower, it's completely free. Super-complicated policy.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    Super-complicated policy.
    Creepy too.



  • @dkf said:

    ]The additional costs can be either borne by the caller or the callee. Think of it this way: in North America, one pays to receive marketing cold calls while you're in the middle of taking a shower.

    Yes. And mobile to mobile gets double charged. For me to be the receiver in that kind of action it is free but it costs me the same to call either a mobile or landline from me mobile. In fact with VoIP I pay 10¢ untimed to any landline in Australia but about 15¢/min to a mobile: my mobile plan has about 300 minutes so I rarely use VoIP especially calling a mobile.@dkf said:

    There are firms that specialise in that, buying up chunks of capacity and reselling it. Cl

    That's why I can call you for only a few cents a minute from VoIP but almost $1 per minute from the local monopoly telephone company.



  • @Zemm said:

    In fact with VoIP I pay 10¢ untimed to any landline in Australia but about 15¢/min to a mobile
    Wow, according to my provider's price list, my calls to Australia cost between 0,05 and 0,16€/minute, except for Optus (0,19€) and Mobilesat (3,22€).


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