Are You Scottish? I've no idea anymore.



  •  This code is trying to work out if the employee is Scottish.

     

      int funcEnd = GetParameter(employeeData, "ISSCOTTISH", resultField);
      if (funcEnd)
      {
        strcpy_s(errorMessage,
                 "Warning - The ISSCOTTISH Indicator Was Not Found");
        ReportError(data,errorMessage, errorFile);
        englishScottish = 'N';
      }
      else
        englishScottish = resultField[0];
    
      if(englishScottish != 'N' && englishScottish != 'Y')
      {
        if (data->defUseScottishInd != '\0')
        {
          englishScottish = data->defUseScottishInd;
        }
        else
        {
          englishScottish = 'N';
        }
      }
    
      if (englishScottish == 'Y')
        englishScottish = 'S';
      if (englishScottish == 'N')
        englishScottish = 'E';
      if (englishScottish != 'S'  &&
          englishScottish != ' '  &&
          englishScottish != '\0' &&
          englishScottish != 'E')
      {
        strcpy_s(errorMessage,
                 300,
                 "Warning - The ISSCOTTISH Indicator Was Not Recognised");
        ReportError(data,errorMessage, errorFile);
        englishScottish = 'E';
      }
      if (englishScottish == 'S')
        isScotInd = 'Y';
      else
        isScotInd = 'N';
    

    Apart form the horrible formatting here are a few of the WTFs I see:

    1. Two separate variable which indicate whether the employee is scottish (isScotInd and scottishEnglish)
    2. Using the variable which is supposed to be E / S initially for Y / N, changing it, then setting the Y / N variable afterwards.
    3. If the ISSCOTTISH parameter is not found it will not use the default, but will if the parameter is found but doesn't have a valid value (Y or N).
    4. If englishScottish is ' ' or '\0' it will not be changed to 'E' (the default), luckily elsewhere the code only checks against 'S'.


  • Skipping the biggest WTF... why would it matter if the employee were Scottish?



  • Don't you need  a fuzzy seach to find out if he's a TRUE Scottsman?

    enum IsScottish
    {
       Yes = 1,
       No = 2,
       Truly = -7

    }



  •  @blakeyrat said:

    Skipping the biggest WTF... why would it matter if the employee were Scottish?

    It's using it to pick which set of tax tables to use, so technically it's actually if the person is resident in Scotland rather than being Scottish. But that would have made for a less amusing title.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Skipping the biggest WTF... why would it matter if the employee were Scottish?
     

    So they can pay them in whiskey, haggis and cultural steroetypes.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Lorne Kates said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    Skipping the biggest WTF... why would it matter if the employee were Scottish?
    So they can pay them in whiskey, haggis and cultural steroetypes.
    Paying someone who is Scottish in whiskey would be a terrible insult.

    Good plan.



  • If you add Welsh, the variable could cover all four directions: N S E W.



  • @dkf said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    @blakeyrat said:
    Skipping the biggest WTF... why would it matter if the employee were Scottish?
    So they can pay them in whiskey, haggis and cultural steroetypes.
    Paying someone who is Scottish in whiskey would be a terrible insult.

    Good plan.

     

    Filed under: whiskey = non-scotch

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_whiskey

    Scotch whisky, often simply called Scotch, is malt whisky or grain whisky made <font size="4">in Scotland</font>. Scotch whisky must be made in a manner specified by law.

    As of 23 November 2009, the Scotch Whisky Regulations 2009
    (SWR) define "Scotch whisky" as whisky that is:

    • Produced at a distillery <font size="4">in Scotland</font> from water and malted barley
      (to which only whole grains of other cereals may be added) all of which
      have been:

      • Processed at that distillery into a mash
      • Converted at that distillery to a fermentable substrate only by endogenous enzyme systems
      • Fermented at that distillery only by adding yeast
      • Distilled at an alcoholic strength by volume of less than 94.8% (190 US proof)
    • Wholly matured in an excise warehouse <font size="4">in Scotland </font>in oak casks of a capacity not exceeding 700 litres (185 US gal; 154 imp gal) for at least three years

     


     

     



  • @El_Heffe said:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_whiskey
     

    Yup. There was even a famous Canadian disterllery (Glenora, in Cape Brenton) who got in trouble over this. First they claimed to be the only Canadian "real actual" Scotch, using some loophole along the lines of "the barrels, ingredients, etc are all from Scottland".  The Scotch Council (not their acutal name, but close enough) said no. Then they got sued because the Whiskey they made was called Glen Somethingorother.  The lawsuit (which went on for years, went to the Supreme Court, had several appeals, finally lost) claimed that the word "glen" was misleading, because "glen" implies scottish whiskey (Scotch).

    Really, there's no difference between scotch, whiskey or bourbon-- and anyone who tells you there is can also hear the "warm tones" coming off their Monster Cables that no machine can measure.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Really, there's no difference between scotch, whiskey or bourbon-- and anyone who tells you there is can also hear the "warm tones" coming off their Monster Cables that no machine can measure.

    I'm sorry, but you've committed a category error. Whisk(e)y is a class that includes many different spirits, including scotch and bourbon. So no, you can't tell scotch from whiskey, for the same reason you can't tell cabbage from vegetables. But bourbon and scotch are quite distinct--bourbon has to be over 50% corn, first of all, so unlike Monster Cables the raw ingredients are already different.



  •  Nationality is a big gray area.  I always thought I'd spent my entire lifetime on the North American continent, but now they tell me that oceans don't matter.  It's all about tectonic plates, and Cuba is part of North America.  But the place I was born and the place I lived until I was ten years old are west of the San Andreas fault, so I'm actually a native of the Pacific, same as Obama.



  • Whiskey != whisky.



  • @smxlong said:

    Whiskey != whisky.
     

    It's a color colour thing. It's spelled differently in different countries. Hell, if I go to the liquour store, it's spelled differently in the same friggin aisle.  No, not that the bottles are spelled differently based on country of origin-- but the aisle will be labelled "Whiskey", but the shelf placards will say "Whisky".

    Also, some people want to have sex with Whiskey, the anthropomorphic whisk.



  • smxlong is correct, and the shelf labeller's at your liquor store are wrong.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Lorne Kates said:

    Hell, if I go to the liquour store, it's spelled differently in the same friggin aisle.
    But you're in Canada; nobody who matters expects the store there to get it right. Whisky (no “e”) is defined as being the same as scotch and must come from Scotland, and whiskey (with an “e”) is non-scotch. It's got nothing to do with the taste or colour or quality or strength, it's just a daft definitional difference.

    I'm quite OK with accusing the Scots of making whiskey, on the grounds that baiting the Scots is an English national pastime.



  •  From Wikipedia's reference links:

    Oxford English Dictionary, Second
    Edition: "In modern trade usage, Scotch whisky and Irish whiskey are
    thus distinguished in spelling; whisky is the usual spelling in Britain
    and whiskey that in the U.S."



  • @Mithious said:

    It's using it to pick which set of tax tables to use, so technically it's actually if the person is resident in Scotland rather than being Scottish. But that would have made for a less amusing title.

    I'm disappointed that the "Ind" in some variable names is apparently short for "Indicator". On my first skim-read I thought this might be code from an SNP psephology program.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    It's a color colour thing. It's spelled differently in different countries.

    Nope, Irish whiskey is distilled 3 times while Scottish whisky is only distilled twice. That makes a difference which you can actually taste. But I'm arguing with a person who thinks bourbon and scotch are the same, so you probably cannot even tell apples from oranges.



  • @random said:

    you probably cannot even tell apples from oranges

    You actually think there's a difference between those, too? You just love falling for the grocery store's marketing lies. There's no difference between an apple, and orange (or, shock secret, a grapefruit). They're all nutritiously and genetically EXACTLY the same, just packaged different-- and even then, just barely. Here, you tell me if you can actually spot the difference (each shelf has a different fruit, but I won't tell you which is which):



  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @Lorne Kates said:

    @random said:

    you probably cannot even tell apples from oranges

    You actually think there's a difference between those, too? You just love falling for the grocery store's marketing lies. There's no difference between an apple, and orange (or, shock secret, a grapefruit). They're all nutritiously and genetically EXACTLY the same, just packaged different-- and even then, just barely. Here, you tell me if you can actually spot the difference (each shelf has a different fruit, but I won't tell you which is which):


    Nice try, but I know tangerines when I see them.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @random said:

    you probably cannot even tell apples from oranges

    You actually think there's a difference between those, too? You just love falling for the grocery store's marketing lies. There's no difference between an apple, and orange (or, shock secret, a grapefruit). They're all nutritiously and genetically EXACTLY the same, just packaged different-- and even then, just barely. Here, you tell me if you can actually spot the difference (each shelf has a different fruit, but I won't tell you which is which):


    You're obviously bananas. Those are all snozberries.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Skipping the biggest WTF... why would it matter if the employee were Scottish?

    Scotland and England & Wales have separate legal systems.



  • @Quango said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    Skipping the biggest WTF... why would it matter if the employee were Scottish?

    Scotland and England Wales have separate legal systems.

    The point I was getting at, and Mithious already answered this two days ago, is that "Scottish" is a nationality. There are Scottish in the US, and no they are not subject to the legal system of Scotland. What legal system a person is under depends on their place of residence, not their nationality.

    What he's really trying to query is "people who live in Scotland", which is a far different concept than "Scottish". (Although there is admittedly a lot of overlap.)



  • @blakeyrat said:

    There are Scottish in the US, and no they are not subject to the legal system of Scotland. What legal system a person is under depends on their place of residence, not their nationality.

    The US IRS clearly doesn't believe that.



  • @pjt33 said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    There are Scottish in the US, and no they are not subject to the legal system of Scotland. What legal system a person is under depends on their place of residence, not their nationality.

    The US IRS clearly doesn't believe that.
    Neither does the NSA.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @pjt33 said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    There are Scottish in the US, and no they are not subject to the legal system of Scotland. What legal system a person is under depends on their place of residence, not their nationality.

    The US IRS clearly doesn't believe that.
    Neither does the NSA.

    One might argue that the US government and all organisations associated with it don't believe that at all. (Unless we're talking about a citizen of the United States, of course.)



  • One also might be a pedantic dickweed. But wouldn't it be nice if one were not?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    One also might be a pedantic dickweed. But It wouldn't it be nice the TDWTF Side Bar if one were not?.
    FTFY



  • @random said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    It's a color colour thing. It's spelled differently in different countries.

    Nope, Irish whiskey is distilled 3 times while Scottish whisky is only distilled twice. That makes a difference which you can actually taste.

    Yep, one tastes vile, and the other tastes extra-vile.



  • @Maciejasjmj said:

    @random said:
    @Lorne Kates said:
    It's a color colour thing. It's spelled differently in different countries.

    Nope, Irish whiskey is distilled 3 times while Scottish whisky is only distilled twice. That makes a difference which you can actually taste.

    Yep, one tastes vile, and the other tastes extra-vile.

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    One also might be a pedantic dickweed. But wouldn't it be nice if one were not?
    Can we get t-shirts that say that?  Maybe without the "also", y'know, because context.


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