Does anybody read these emails before sending?



  • Got this one from Verizon (checked the headers, and it does indeed appear to be from them).

     [IMG]http://i.imgur.com/6zBq5XY.png[/IMG]



  • They mean don't click any links in the "fake" emails. This one is clearly from Verizon (because it says so) so it's perfectly safe to click the links.



  •  One time I received a legitimate email from AT&T (my email host at the time) that asked me to follow a link to reset my password.  I marked it as spam.



  • There is a chance that the link is intentional to detect reading fail and points to a special page with big banner "READ THE MAIL AGAIN, RETARD" or something similar.



  • From past experience, I'd say a disappointingly low chance, though.




  • They mean don't click any links in the "fake" emails.
    This one is clearly from Verizon (because it says so) so it's perfectly
    safe to click the links.

     

    TRWTF is that the image's URL ends in .jpg.png.



  • Once I received a email ostensibly from Home Depot (coincidentally, I had placed an order from them) that said "Dear User, your order has be cancellled. Please click this link to go to our site." Complete with bad grammar. And the link did not go to homedepot, it went to "quickmailsending.com". And at the bottom was a disclaimer saying that the company may take long or short positions in the stock mentioned and if I bought or sold any stocks based on the message, it was at my own risk and the company was not liable.

    And I didn't even see it at the time because my spam filter marked it as spam (no surprise there)

    A few weeks later I wondered where my order was, and called them. They said "Your order was cancelled, we sent you an email." I searched my junk box and found the email and marvelled at how spammy it was. HD didn't see a problem with it. They didn't even mind that the message was automatically marked as spam.



  • @TGV said:


    They mean don't click any links in the "fake" emails.
    This one is clearly from Verizon (because it says so) so it's perfectly
    safe to click the links.

     

    TRWTF is that the image's URL ends in .jpg.png.

    Well, I wasn't being serious but you can imagine a dishearteningly similar conversation happening at these companies


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