Well that's one way to send a URL



  • ...Or the least useful part of it, anyway.

    One of our users was having some trouble running a report. The report name they described didn't sound familiar. We tried getting more info on which one it is; a URL, navigation steps, whatever.

    This is what we got in the email response. I haven't resized this.

    This is why shampoo bottles have instructions on them.

    (Just-barely-readable company name redacted.)



  • Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does … Or perhaps in need of a wooden table.



  • @Gurth said:

    Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does
    There is no "Command" key on my keyboard so I don't know what it does either.



  • @Gurth said:

    Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does …
    How is that going to help on a photograph?



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @Gurth said:

    Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does
    There is no "Command" key on my keyboard so I don't know what it does either.

    Fruity flavoured screen-shotting only part of the screen, so Google tells me...



  • @PJH said:

    @Gurth said:
    Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does …
    How is that going to help on a photograph?
    Now that I know what Shift+Command+4 is, I think his point was that the person should have done a screen-cap instead of taking a picture of the screen with his phone.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @PJH said:

    @Gurth said:
    Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does …
    How is that going to help on a photograph?
    Now that I know what Shift+Command+4 is, I think his point was that the person should have done a screen-cap instead of taking a picture of the screen with his phone.

    And if you're familiar with Reporting Services, you'd know that the little bit of the URL actually displayed is worthless for figuring out what report it is.



  • Did the sender resize it or are they taking photos with an ancient phone? Even my POS old flip phone took higher resolution photos than that.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @PJH said:

    @Gurth said:
    Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does …
    How is that going to help on a photograph?
    Now that I know what Shift+Command+4 is, I think his point was that the person should have done a screen-cap instead of taking a picture of the screen with his phone.

    TRWTF IS PUTTING THE CURSOR IN THE SCREENSHOT. WHO DOES THAT?! EVEN GIT KNOWS BETTER!



  • @PJH said:

    Fruity flavoured screen-shotting only part of the screen, so Google tells me...
     

    Oh, it's the shortcut key for the cupcake?



  • @Gurth said:

    Clearly someone who doesn't know what Shift+Command+4 does … Or perhaps in need of a wooden table.
     

    I'd settle with just a few more megapixels.



  • @lolwtf said:

    Did the sender resize it or are they taking photos with an ancient phone? Even my POS old flip phone took higher resolution photos than that.

    I was wondering the same thing. Does an iPhone even give you the option of scaling it down that much?



  • TRWTF here are email clients.
    Dunno about other email clients, but Outlook automatically scales down pictures that are pasted in the body of the message.



  • It could have went via MMS.



  • @garrywong said:

    TRWTF here are email clients.
    Dunno about other email clients, but Outlook automatically scales down pictures that are pasted in the body of the message.

    This is a user problem. I thought they all knew that you were supposed to paste your screenshots into a Word document.



  • @boomzilla said:

    @garrywong said:
    TRWTF here are email clients.
    Dunno about other email clients, but Outlook automatically scales down pictures that are pasted in the body of the message.

    This is a user problem. I thought they all knew that you were supposed to paste your screenshots into a Word document.

    I think the problem is they only teach you how to use Microsoft products at university/college/secretary school. "Ignore the fact your Microsoft OS can easily attach, send and view actual image files, our organization paid thousands of dollars for Office licenses and I'll be damned if we let that go to waste." I will never understand that as long as I live.



  • The TDWTF meme : word ratio in this thread is about 1 : 3. Come on, we can do better!



  • @db2 said:

    And if you're familiar with Reporting Services, you'd know that the little bit of the URL actually displayed is worthless for figuring out what report it is.

    You can't see the arguments because they've gone off the end of the address bar, right?

    I never had to deal with support for reports, but I did once have to send a bug report to a company because depending on the way you viewed the report, if it overlapped the spring weekend where daylight saving time changes, the stats were wrong (I was guessing an hour wrong).

    While an interesting oddity, this was a standard bug/reporting practice. The strange part was the reaction: "Yep. There's definitely a bug. Can I close the ticket now?". No, close the ticket when it's fixed.



  • @garrywong said:

    Outlook automatically scales down pictures that are pasted in the body of the message.
     

    Outlook 2007 does not. Later versions do?



  • I feel strangely uneasy with the fact the picture is a PNG.

    Did you convert it before posting, did imgur convert it, or was it originally a PNG already?

    I just find it strange that the photo isn't a JPEG, that's all.



  • @aapis said:

    Ignore the fact your Microsoft OS can easily attach, send and view actual image files
     

    Yes, they completely ignore that fact.

    @aapis said:

    our organization paid thousands of dollars for Office licenses and I'll be damned if we let that go to waste

    It's more because Word has a "send as email attachment" button, that they know, because they use it all the time, while they don't know how to use email.

     



  • @Zecc said:

    I feel strangely uneasy with the fact the picture is a PNG.

    Did you convert it before posting, did imgur convert it, or was it originally a PNG already?

    I just find it strange that the photo isn't a JPEG, that's all.

    I converted it so as not to incur additional artifacting when redacting it.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @boomzilla said:

    This is a user problem. I thought they all knew that you were supposed to paste your screenshots into a Excel spreadsheet.
    FTFY



  • @db2 said:

    @Zecc said:

    I feel strangely uneasy with the fact the picture is a PNG.

    Did you convert it before posting, did imgur convert it, or was it originally a PNG already?

    I just find it strange that the photo isn't a JPEG, that's all.

    I converted it so as not to incur additional artifacting when redacting it.

    Check the EXIF data in the original... did the camera really take it at that microscopic size, or did they use some sort of resizer tool before they e-mailed it?



  • @boomzilla said:

    I thought they all knew that you were supposed to paste your screenshots into a Word document.
     

    And then take a screenshot of the Word document. That way you can get TWO cursors into the final screen shot!



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @boomzilla said:
    I thought they all knew that you were supposed to paste your screenshots into a Word document.

    And then take a screenshot of the Word document. That way you can get TWO cursors into the final screen shot!

    If you're like blakey, you can get another cursor by taking the original picture as a selfie.



  • I used to support a team of statisticians who relied on a series of web-based reports that were generated by a half-baked PERL monstrosity left behind by a distant predecessor who left the company for mental health reasons soon thereafter().  From time to time the beast would crash instead of generating a report and dump an error message on the browser.  After some poking and prodding I was able to convince the system to dump the text of whatever Frankensteined SQL query had caused the problem along with the error message, hoping that this would aid in reproducing problems and debugging them.

    After making the change I asked the users to send me a copy of any error messages that they see whenever something went wrong. They agreed that that was a good idea and we all went back to our desks, naively thinking that we understood one another.

    The very next week I started receiving emailed error reports.  Containing attached Word documents.  Which contained screen-shots of Internet Explorer windows with giant scroll bars on the edges.  And, right there in the middle, the leftmost 10% of the error message that I needed to see.  The only thing missing was the wooden table.

     

    () This part isn't really true.  He had actually had a heart attack at work one day and never made it home.  A few months later I was brought in to replace him and given his office along with many of his books, personal papers, and his completely untouched workstation which contained domeumentation and source code for important projects mixed in with family photos, letters and unfinished mortgage applications.  My manager refused to talk about him for months before finally explaining what had happened.  That was definitely the second weirdest start to a new job I have ever had().

     

    ()The first would be the day that I showed up at the new employer's office, checked in with reception and was left waiting for over an hour for the team lead to come out and meet me.  He never did, because he had been fired moments after I showed up.  The rest of his team circled on auto-pilot for two months before a replacement was found.



  • @DCRoss said:

    I used to support a team of statisticians who relied on a series of web-based reports that were generated by a half-baked PERL monstrosity left behind by a distant predecessor who left the company for mental health reasons soon thereafter().  From time to time the beast would crash instead of generating a report and dump an error message on the browser.  After some poking and prodding I was able to convince the system to dump the text of whatever Frankensteined SQL query had caused the problem along with the error message, hoping that this would aid in reproducing problems and debugging them.

    After making the change I asked the users to send me a copy of any error messages that they see whenever something went wrong. They agreed that that was a good idea and we all went back to our desks, naively thinking that we understood one another.

    The very next week I started receiving emailed error reports.  Containing attached Word documents.  Which contained screen-shots of Internet Explorer windows with giant scroll bars on the edges.  And, right there in the middle, the leftmost 10% of the error message that I needed to see.  The only thing missing was the wooden table.

     

    () This part isn't really true.  He had actually had a heart attack at work one day and never made it home.  A few months later I was brought in to replace him and given his office along with many of his books, personal papers, and his completely untouched workstation which contained domeumentation and source code for important projects mixed in with family photos, letters and unfinished mortgage applications.  My manager refused to talk about him for months before finally explaining what had happened.  That was definitely the second weirdest start to a new job I have ever had().

     

    ()The first would be the day that I showed up at the new employer's office, checked in with reception and was left waiting for over an hour for the team lead to come out and meet me.  He never did, because he had been fired moments after I showed up.  The rest of his team circled on auto-pilot for two months before a replacement was found.




  • @DCRoss said:

    the day that I showed up at the new employer's office, checked in with reception and was left waiting for over an hour for the team lead to come out and meet me.  He never did, because he had been fired moments after I showed up.  The rest of his team circled on auto-pilot for two months before a replacement was found.
    How long did you hesitate before deciding not to waltz in and announce that you were the new team lead and were now in charge?



  • @da Doctah said:

    How long did you hesitate before deciding not to waltz in and announce that you were the new team lead and were now in charge?
     

    A wise man() once said "I do not desire the captaincy. I am much more content with my
    scientific duties. And I am frankly content to be a lesser target."

    It's important to understand what kind of company this is.  It was started some time in the 1950s and specialized in buying stuffed animals from an un-named overseas supplier which I will refer to by the code name of "China", putting tags on them and reselling them throughout North America.  The company was divided into two distinct parts -- The management, who all needed to put their first initials on their office doors to avoid confusion, and the peasants, who worked in the warehouses in exchange for a few dry crusts of bread and being allowed to sleep in the parking lot a few nights every week.  Due to the finite size of the family people in management were never replaced, but it was not unusual to have entire shifts of peasants fed to the hounds and replaced by equally valued workers the very next day.

    This continued until sometime around 2005 when an outside contractor introduced the head of the family to a new concept which married their existing lines of stuffed animals with a game-centric web site (Let's call it "InternetRelativez.com" and leave it at that).  The unfortunate contractor was immediately beheaded and his code forced into production by a team of finite monkeys all sharing a typewriter, where it proceeded to fall down more often than Rob Ford at a St. Patrick's Day parade.  The Godfather responded in his traditional way by firing the entire IT team() and trying to hire replacements at minimum wage, but somehow his demonstrations of power failed to produce the desired result of a loyal workforce and stable products.

    I had heard stories about this place but hey, there was a recession going on and I found myself available so I went with it anyway.   A year later, after watching people being fired for doing everything from suggesting that perhaps members of the development team could learn how to use subversion on their own (much to the dismay of the head of that department, who said a few words to the right people and had the complainer executed^W encouraged to persue interests outside of the company) to trying to break out of a suspiciously expensive contract with a cut-rate data centre (which threatened the rather obvious flow of kick-backs, and led to more public hangings^W^W volutary resignations), I finally decided that I had had enough of a vacation from the real world and arranged to return to this century.

    So, no, declaring myself in charge might have been fun, but it would have only led to having to butt heads with buttheads who would have made Horatio Hornblower say "Man, I'm glad I work here instead of there", so instead of just fixed what needed fixing, made things better for people who didn't even know they were broken, kept quiet at meetings and spent my days networking with the other tourists there and working with the underground railroad, helping people who deserved better move into real IT careers instead. 

     

    () Jerome Bixby, for those of you playing along at home.

    (**) Really.  The web site went down on Christmas Day and wasn't fully restored until some time after New Year's.  As a thank you for giving up their holidays and working tirelessly to make things better, every single person with any connection to the sysadmin team was fired and escorted roughly off the property.  The only survivor, a guy who had accepted an offer in December but postponed his start date until January, walked in on his first day to find an empty cubicle farm and two sheets of scribbled documentation trapped under a monitor.  He spent the next month just trying to figure out what everything was and how it was supposed to work before he could deal with why it didn't.

     


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