Win8



  • @Zecc said:

    Anyway, why the fuck did Microsoft stop selling Win7? I won't buy Win8 on principle, so they will be losing potential money if/when I get a new computer.
    1. I bought a laptop with Windows 7 about a month ago for my mom; where are you shopping?
    2. Windows 8 Professional comes with full downgrade rights to Windows 7 http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/downgrade_rights.aspx#fbid=PtavZrAVIr6

    That said, I like W8.1. Like most major Windows UI revisions for client software (I haven't played with a Windows Server yet with the Modern UI), the first major service pack seems to always be what the software should have been at launch. (Boot to desktop option, fully integrated settings in Modern, etc.)



  • @Zecc said:

    My problem with "Connect automatically when this network is in range" being off, as I like it, is that when the connection drops Windows won't reconnect again automatically.
    I can't say I've ever had that problem. If the connection drops, Windows at least tries to reconnect automatically (although the problem was usually that my crappy router needed to be reset).


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Mcoder said:

    Just a small secret: I mainly use Linux for more than 10 years... I was never able to get a fully working installation of Ubuntu.


    I wouldn't go around telling people that if I were you.



  • @Zecc said:

    I wish it meant "don't connect on startup, but when I tell you to connect keep the connection alive even if it means reconnecting, then when I tell you to disconnect stop connecting".
    That's exactly what it does. You tell Windows to connect or not somewhere else - on the available networks screen.



  • @PedanticCurmudgeon said:

    @Mcoder said:

    Just a small secret: I mainly use Linux for more than 10 years... I was never able to get a fully working installation of Ubuntu.


    I wouldn't go around telling people that if I were you.
    Probably hardware - I managed to get it installed and running on a 2GB CF card, after a few attempts, on some embedded hardware.





    Why I had to do that, however, is another matter - and it wasn't by choice. (It involved a mobile company's modem and their WTF-worthy API for communicating with their modems.)



  • @Mcoder said:

    Theory goes that if you don't anounce your network, hackers won't know it's there, so you are safe. The fact that this theory is completely false don't stop such kind of people, thus Windows has to support it.
    Doesn't disabling SSID broadcasting reduce the amount of radiation around us, though? Serious question.

    Edit: assuming wireless clients that don't go around trying to connect blindly, but only when told to.

    @El_Heffe said:

    @Zecc said:

    Anyway, why the fuck did Microsoft stop selling Win7?
    They did?  That's news to me.

    Sure, but Newegg isn't Microsoft. I've asked them if I could buy from them, even just serial numbers because I already have the DVD, they said they're no longer selling.

    @rad131304 said:

    Windows 8 Professional comes with full downgrade rights to Windows 7
    Cool. Didn't know that.

    @TDWTF123 said:

    @Zecc said:
    I wish it meant "don't
    connect on startup, but when I tell you to connect keep the connection
    alive even if it means reconnecting, then when I tell you to disconnect
    stop connecting".
    That's exactly what it does. You tell Windows
    to connect or not somewhere else - on the available networks
    screen.
    Sure, that's where I go tell Windows to reconnect every time the connection drops. I just wish I didn't have to. Yeah, the problem wouldn't be there if the connection wasn't so crappy, but two wrongs don't make a right.

     



     



  • @Zecc said:

    but two wrongs don't make a right.

    But how many wrongs make a git?



  • @Zecc said:

    two wrongs don't make a right
    But three lefts do.



  • @Zecc said:

    Doesn't disabling SSID broadcasting reduce the amount of radiation around us, though? Serious question.
    No. It still transmits the exact same packets to notify wireless clients that it exists, but the SSID field is left blank.@Zecc said:
    Edit: assuming wireless clients that don't go around trying to connect blindly, but only when told to.
    Well, that's exactly what wireless clients do. So in fact it just increases the amount of radiation.



  • @anotherusername said:

    @Zecc said:
    Doesn't disabling SSID broadcasting reduce the amount of radiation around us, though? Serious question.
    No. It still transmits the exact same packets to notify wireless clients that it exists, but the SSID field is left blank.
    That seems rather stupid. I thought disabling SSID broadcasting meant disabling broadcasting altogether.

    @anotherusername said:

    @Zecc said:
    Edit: assuming wireless clients that don't go around trying to connect blindly, but only when told to.
    Well, that's exactly what wireless clients do. So in fact it just increases the amount of radiation.
    Are you telling me my RF kill switch is a lie? My belief system is broken, my world view is shattered! I need to lie down.



  • @Zecc said:

    @anotherusername said:
    @Zecc said:
    Doesn't disabling SSID broadcasting reduce the amount of radiation around us, though? Serious question.
    No. It still transmits the exact same packets to notify wireless clients that it exists, but the SSID field is left blank.
    That seems rather stupid. I thought disabling SSID broadcasting meant disabling broadcasting altogether.
    No - it stops it broadcasting the SSID. Like the name indicates. Here's a pikiweedia article on what is broadcast. Of course, since this isn't the only way of discovering the SSID, it's on a par with changing the default ports for services as a way of obfuscating how it can be used.



  • @Zecc said:

    @TDWTF123 said:
    @Zecc said:
    I wish it meant "don't
    connect on startup, but when I tell you to connect keep the connection
    alive even if it means reconnecting, then when I tell you to disconnect
    stop connecting".
    That's exactly what it does. You tell Windows
    to connect or not somewhere else - on the available networks
    screen.
    Sure, that's where I go tell Windows to reconnect every time the connection drops. I just wish I didn't have to. Yeah, the problem wouldn't be there if the connection wasn't so crappy, but two wrongs don't make a right.
    You've turned off automatic reconnection. This is a different thing to whether you manually connect to a network or connect automatically when it's detected or on startup or whatnot. You should turn on 'automatically reconnect' and set the connection to manual. Then you go and click on it to connect, and again to disconnect when you're done.



  • @PedanticCurmudgeon said:

    @Mcoder said:

    Just a small secret: I mainly use Linux for more than 10 years... I was never able to get a fully working installation of Ubuntu.


    I wouldn't go around telling people that if I were you.
     

    Why? From Linux from scratch, to distros that don't exist anymore to the more maintream Debian and Red Hat (and several derivatives of both), I've used them all. Are you saying that a distro giving me problems is a signal that I'm not competent enough for using it?

     

    And yes, it was always hardware. Every time I tried Ubuntu there was a hardware problem. Always different hardware, but there was always something that didn't work specificaly on Ubuntu. Yeah,  I could always compile another kernel, replace the initrd, change the udev rules and threaten the computer untill it works. But I always choosed to just install something that I could update later.

     



  • @Zecc said:

    That seems rather stupid. I thought disabling SSID broadcasting meant disabling broadcasting altogether.

    Nope. http://blogs.technet.com/b/networking/archive/2008/02/08/non-broadcast-wireless-ssids-why-hidden-wireless-networks-are-a-bad-idea.aspx

    It is possible to configure most wireless Access Points (AP) to not broadcast their SSID (Service Set Identifier). The intent of this feature is to prevent unauthorized users from being able to detect the wireless network from their wireless clients. APs send beacon frames to advertise capability information and parameter sets for the network. Turning off broadcasting on the AP does not prevent the beacon frame from being sent. The wireless AP still sends a beacon frame, but it is sent with the SSID value set to NULL.

    ...and then you have the wireless clients, which periodically send probe requests that include the SSID (in the clear) of the network that they're trying to connect to.

    So to summarise, if you had a wi-fi access point that you never ever used, then a sniffer would be able to determine that you had it (by the beacon packets) but would not be able to determine the SSID; as soon as you connected a device the sniffer would be able to get the SSID because the device needs to transmit that to connect.

    @Zecc said:
    Are you telling me my RF kill switch is a lie?
    No... the airplane mode switch should work fine. And then you can just unplug the useless wi-fi hub as you won't be able to use it anyway.


  • @Helix said:

    Recently I had to connect to a new building WiFi and there are a couple of different networks, so they need setting up to connect in the correct order and might as well delete that coffee shop I connected to once - that used to be easy in Win7.

    I had a quick Google and at best I can find Microsoft suggest to do it via the command line:
     http://windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows-8/manage-wireless-network-profiles

    Try doing it on an iOS device. The only way to make it forget an SSID is to be within range of an AP that has that SSID.


  • @Jedalyzer said:

    It seems that every other version of Windows is trash.

    • Windows 3.1 - revolutionary for its time.
    • Windows 95 - some problems.
    • Windows 98 - pretty good.
    • Windows ME - useless and pointless.
    • Windows XP - nice.
    • Windows Vista - worthless.
    • Windows 7 - great.
    • Windows 8 - WHAAA????!!?!?!!!!??

    I have good hopes for Windows 9. 🙂


    They've gone Star Trek.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Mcoder said:

    @PedanticCurmudgeon said:

    I wouldn't go around telling people that if I were you.
     

    Why? From Linux from scratch, to distros that don't exist anymore to the more maintream Debian and Red Hat (and several derivatives of both), I've used them all. Are you saying that a distro giving me problems is a signal that I'm not competent enough for using it?

    No, it makes you sound more like the "I've been a sysadmin for 20 years but I can't get Linux to work" sort of troll that used to frequent Linux forums.
    @Mcoder said:

    And yes, it was always hardware. Every time I tried Ubuntu there was a hardware problem. Always different hardware, but there was always something that didn't work specificaly on Ubuntu. Yeah,  I could always compile another kernel, replace the initrd, change the udev rules and threaten the computer untill it works. But I always choosed to just install something that I could update later.

     

    So what did you use instead of Ubuntu?



  • @CodeNinja said:

    @Jedalyzer said:

    I have good hopes for Windows 9. 🙂


    I'm just hoping they don't go full derp and do away with the mouse and keyboard altogether. I can't imagine how hard it would be to use Excel on a pure touch interface.

    You joke, but my wife has to do that. The IT department bought everyone iPads because they're cheaper than giving everyone laptops.

    The iPad essentially does nothing but logs into a VMWare VDI instance and from there they use a few webapps and, of course, Office. She does a decent amount of work in Excel (not real Excel work, mostly just formatting crap into nice columns and copy-pasting stuff from one spreadsheet into another spreadsheet). She does it all w/o a mouse, but they did get her and her co-workers a bluetooth keyboard that blows goats.

    She's actually gotten pretty good at it. I suppose when you fool around with an iPad for 20-30 hrs/wk, you can do all kinds of fun stuff in Excel with nothing but a touch interface.



  • @Chame1eon said:

    I can't beleive it is possible make reading logs so ridiculously slow and awkward even with low end hardware.
    Don't worry, even with high-end hardware (Xeon E5, SSD, 32GB RAM) the logs are still slow (it takes a bit less than 2 minutes for the Event Viewer to load in this configuration - I'll never understand how they managed to screw that up). Also, trying to filter often results in "Event file is corrupt" message or something similar.



  • @CodeNinja said:

    @Jedalyzer said:

    I have good hopes for Windows 9. 🙂


    I'm just hoping they don't go full derp and do away with the mouse and keyboard altogether. I can't imagine how hard it would be to use Excel on a pure touch interface.
    Well, since they seem to be badly copying Apple, maybe they'll badly copy The Onion badly copying Apple.


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