XT9 on HTC Android phone



  • Not a major WTF but... I have a work-provided HTC Wildfire phone and I find the XT9 predictive text/auto correct pretty hopeless. A few examples

    When composing a text (or Whatsapp) message you will have occasion to add a word into the dictionary. The process for this is:
    1) Start typing the word until you find it's not in the dictionary
    2) Click the down arrow
    3) Click "Add Word"
    4) Enter the word using ABC entry instead of XT9
    5) Click OK
    6) Retype the word and it will be found in the dictionary

    It doesn't make sense to me to have to add the word into the dictionary and then add it to the message. Is there a scenario where you'd want to add a word to the dictionary but not use it there and then in the message? (I've not found a place outside of messaging where you can add words to the dictionary.)

    When typing a long word it tends to give you similar suggestions e.g. if entering 'congratulations' it suggests both 'congratulate' and 'congratulated'. It would be better to offer word forms with greater differences.

    Minor stuff I know, but the alternative was doing work on a Friday afternoon.



  • @RTapeLoadingError said:

    It doesn't make sense to me to have to add the word into the dictionary and then add it to the message. Is there a scenario where you'd want to add a word to the dictionary but not use it there and then in the message?

    That's like a webapp where you try to login but after typing your email address or username you can't remember the password; usually when you click the "Forgot password" link you have to type the email address again. Copying the email address in the reset form automatically is so easy to do for the developer yet it's almost never like that, and often the field name is different and the autocomplete won't pick up.

    Just like your dictionary entry it's not a technical WTF but it's a WTF nonetheless because there is no business or technical reason for this not to be implemented properly. Copying a variable does not require a focus group or a business case, it's a no-brainer.



  • @RTapeLoadingError said:

    the alternative was doing work on a Friday afternoon.

    If that's possible in your company I strongly advise you to switch to a 4-day week. There is something almost magical in having long weekends every week; work problems become less invasive and it's easier to get involved in healthy non-IT hobbies like blind-folded demolition derbies or raftless rafting.

    But before you switch check the calendar for statutory holidays; if most of them happen on a Monday then make sure that your day off is Friday so you get extra long weekends when other people get long weekends.



  •  Ah, yes, a successor to the T9 predictive text system. T9 hasn't been improved one bit in the ten years since it was introduced in 2000. It couldn't even figure out that the word you're trying to write is a compound word (my native language uses a lot of them) and just gives up three letters into the second half of the word. I eventually turned it off since it was far more predictable (and perhaps faster) to type without prediction.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Ronald said:

    Copying a variable does not require a focus group or a business case, it's a no-brainer.
    Alas, most login systems are implemented by low-level developers with little brains and less motivation.



  • @Ronald said:

    Copying a variable does not require a focus group or a business case, it's a no-brainer.
     

    If the development is offshored,  yes, it does. In offshored development, everything requires a business case, and there are no no-brainers.



  • @Mcoder said:

    In offshored development, ... there are no no-brainers.
    In my experience, there are many no-brainers involved in off-shored development.

     



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @Mcoder said:

    In offshored development, ... there are no no-brainers.
    In my experience, there are many no-brainers involved in off-shored development.

    Different contexts, Mcoder was problems and you are individuals.



  • @locallunatic said:

    Different contexts, Mcoder was problems and you are individuals.
    Mcoder may or may not have been problems, but I am not individuals; I am only one individual.

     



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @locallunatic said:

    Different contexts, Mcoder was problems and you are individuals.
    Mcoder may or may not have been problems, but I am not individuals; I am only one individual.

    Sure?  I figured you to have MPD.



  • @dkf said:

    Alas, most login systems are implemented by low-level developers with little brains and less motivation.

    Don't forget the high-level management security consultants writing hopeless specifications because they don't appear to have ever logged into a website in their life but they read an old book on security-best-practise.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Qwerty said:

    Don't forget the high-level management security consultants writing hopeless specifications because they don't appear to have ever logged into a website in their life but they read an old book on security-best-practise.
    Hmm, which set of consultants, which large consulting company are we talking about here? So many to choose from. (And every last one of them is able to produce a whole huge system with the sole purpose of persuading you to give them much more money. Or, occasionally, when the mark client gets a bit smarter, their friends, with reciprocating agreements back. Welcome to government contracting!)



  •  Thats the main thing I like about my LG phone, the keyboard and text prediction. It automatically remembers words you use often. Since I speak and write in dialect (eg. there are no dictionaries or even spelling rules) that is pretty helpful.



  • @Qwerty said:

    @dkf said:
    Alas, most login systems are implemented by low-level developers with little brains and less motivation.

    Don't forget the high-level management security consultants writing hopeless specifications because they don't appear to have ever logged into a website in their life but they read an old book on security-best-practise.

    I once was in a meeting with that kind of people. A single topic was discussed during that meeting: should there be a Faraday cage around the pile of discarded hardware stored in the basement (which by policy could not contain hard drives), and if so, what is the desired mesh size to block existing 2.4GHz devices as well as devices that could use a higher frequency in a foreseeable future? The meeting lasted for almost 6h (including a nice lunch brought in by Miss Boobs).

    IIRC the conclusion of the meeting was that before moving forward with that cage it would be better to obtain the exact specifications of the de facto shield provided by the building structure.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @beginner_ said:

    I speak and write in dialect (eg. there are no dictionaries or even spelling rules)

    eye twitch



  • @Ronald said:

    ... [S]hould there be a Faraday cage around the pile of discarded hardware stored in the basement...?
    Why would anyone think this would be necessary?

     



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ronald said:
    ... [S]hould there be a Faraday cage around the pile of discarded hardware stored in the basement...?
    Why would anyone think this would be necessary?
     

    So that nobody can use ultra-red laser to read off the rot-13 encrypted data off of the not-stored-in-that-heap-but-in-the-other harddisks and flash memory chips?

    Or, more probable, for cheaper insurance rates - "BUT WE EVEN KEPT THE EQUIPMENT IN A FARADAY CAGE!!!!eleven!!!"

    That raises another question, though - which frequency (and, therefore, wavelength) should we assume for the repeated flashs of lightning? That information would surely be needed for specification of the cage!



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @Ronald said:

    ... [S]hould there be a Faraday cage around the pile of discarded hardware stored in the basement...?
    Why would anyone think this would be necessary?

     

    Is it to stop sharks eating the discarded hardware?



  • I have an experience to share with you guys. Once I was in a remote place, my signal in my phone got jammed, i thought the problem would be with my service provider. After coming back home i gave black and blues to my customer care highlighting my issue. They pleaded me saying that the problem is not with them. Then i browsed through the search engine regarding my issue, i got a remedy for my cell phone, there i came to know the problem called signal jamming that is experienced in most cell phones. They have a product called signal jammer price could be very useful to get rid of these problems. Check out the details here signal jammer price and hope this information would be beneficial. Hope that u would pass this information to all your friends, so that they too would benefited, Stay safe, Cheers



  • @AlanHartsell said:

    I have an experience to share with you guys. Once I was in a remote place, my signal in my phone got jammed, i thought the problem would be with my service provider. After coming back home i gave black and blues to my customer care highlighting my issue. They pleaded me saying that the problem is not with them. Then i browsed through the search engine regarding my issue, i got a remedy for my cell phone, there i came to know the problem called signal jamming that is experienced in most cell phones. They have a product called signal jammer price could be very useful to get rid of these problems. Check out the details here signal jammer price and hope this information would be beneficial. Hope that u would pass this information to all your friends, so that they too would benefited, Stay safe, Cheers
    Someone seems to have jammed his spamming attempt. Unless it is subtly hidden by some steganographic technique I am un aware of.



  • @OzPeter said:

    @AlanHartsell said:
    I have an experience to share with you guys. Once I was in a remote place, my signal in my phone got jammed, i thought the problem would be with my service provider. After coming back home i gave black and blues to my customer care highlighting my issue. They pleaded me saying that the problem is not with them. Then i browsed through the search engine regarding my issue, i got a remedy for my cell phone, there i came to know the problem called signal jamming that is experienced in most cell phones. They have a product called signal jammer price could be very useful to get rid of these problems. Check out the details here signal jammer price and hope this information would be beneficial. Hope that u would pass this information to all your friends, so that they too would benefited, Stay safe, Cheers
    Someone seems to have jammed his spamming attempt. Unless it is subtly hidden by some steganographic technique I am un aware of.
     

     My signal jammer price helps me surprise my lady every night. Almost as much as when I remember to take out the rubbish!



  • @OzPeter said:

    Someone seems to have jammed his spamming attempt.
    Spammer Jammer®

    Operators are stannding by.  Order yours today.



  • @OzPeter said:

    Someone seems to have jammed his spamming attempt.
     

    Must... resist... referencing... THE thread....



  • I waited 5 months to find out if Ronald's Faraday cages around discarded hardware were to protect it from sharks and when I finally get a response it's spam jammed spam. Disappointing.


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