So yes or no?



  •  [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/2j44nt4.png[/IMG]

    So I know and am sure that I'm NOT going to use Memory Validator with services. Does this mean I should choose Yes?



  • Dopey dialog box message hall of infamy, here we come.

    I assume "No" does not install Memory whatzits, as that is the point of the first question. Further explanations confuse things, though, but they probably came later.

    Forget the explanatory note, and click "No".



  • @levbor said:

    So I know and am sure that I'm NOT going to use Memory Validator with services. Does this mean I should choose Yes?
    Message seems clear to me. Using my powers of divination I guess you are probably installing or configuring this "Memory Validator" and now the application wants to know if you plan to use it for validating the memory of services (as opposed to the default installation that probably only allows validating the memory of standalone applications).
    Then it kindly points out the consequences that if you want to activate this functionality, you could probably get some extra error messages. But if you already know now that you are not going to use this functionality, you can avoid these errors as they are only relevant for this functionality.



  • When I see this kind of dialog I usually click the X to close the window (aka The Hidden Cancel Button) because I trust that someone in the QA department added a test case for this behavior late during the development cycle and that as a result the best default option will be picked for me. Lazy people always get the best default options.



  • @Ronald said:

    I usually click the X to close the window (aka The Hidden Cancel Button) because I trust that someone in the QA department added a test case for this behavior late during the development cycl
    Assuming that they (a) Have a QA department and (b) that they actually do QA -- is TRWTF.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @Ronald said:

    I usually click the X to close the window (aka The Hidden Cancel Button) because I trust that someone in the QA department added a test case for this behavior late during the development cycl
    Assuming that they (a) Have a QA department and (b) that they actually do QA -- is TRWTF.



  • @Ronald said:

    @El_Heffe said:

    @Ronald said:

    I usually click the X to close the window (aka The Hidden Cancel Button) because I trust that someone in the QA department added a test case for this behavior late during the development cycl
    Assuming that they (a) Have a QA department and (b) that they actually do QA -- is TRWTF.



  • @Ronald said:

    When I see this kind of dialog I usually click the X to close the window (aka The Hidden Cancel Button) because I trust that someone in the QA department added a test case for this behavior late during the development cycle and that as a result the best default option will be picked for me. Lazy people always get the best default options.
     

     One would think... until you trip over an example of the opposite as happened to a former coworker lo these many years ago.  I was in the process of teaching him how to manage VMS systems (as in the old DEC product, not virtual machines).  In 1999 we'd finished our "Year 2000 apocolypse" preparations and were ready for The End.  I had already tested, very carefully rolling the date forward on our test machine, without impacting the production server.  He wanted to try it also, so I showed him the command to change the time cluster-wide.  He was smart enough not to hit return, but instead of backspacing over the command to abort his test, he hit Control Z.  Normally for all things VMS, control Z was a clean abort/cancellation.  That day we discovered as our production, real time critical system consumed itself in about two seconds, the cluster control application had a bug....  then we got to practice restoring data as quickly as possible.



  • The question is perfectly obvious. Do you intend to use Memory Validator with services? Yes or No?

    It even:

    - tells you what to do if you aren't sure (choose No, to avoid getting extra error messages that won't be relevant to you)
    - explains exactly what choosing Yes actually does (displays extra error messages that are only relevant if you use Memory Validator with services)
    - tells you what setting turns the extra error messages back on if you select No but change your mind later


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