New Zealand





  •  Not a lot of people named Richard in Kiwiland, I take it (#17)?  Or instructions on adjusting the timing of internal combustion engines (#13), or how to drain the fluid out of a blister (#21)?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @da Doctah said:

    Or instructions on adjusting the timing of internal combustion engines (#13)
    You're either using a Dvorak keyboard and mentally tyop'd, or you have got Felix's surname seriously wrong.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @da Doctah said:

    #9 implies they don't use the technical term for bassoon players
    Or for small bundles of kindling.



  • @dkf said:

    @da Doctah said:
    #9 implies they don't use the technical term for bassoon players
    Or for small bundles of kindling.
    Or meatballs.



  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @da Doctah said:

    @dkf said:

    @da Doctah said:
    #9 implies they don't use the technical term for bassoon players
    Or for small bundles of kindling.
    Or meatballs.



    If you like faggots, you might have spotted dick.



  • @da Doctah said:

    #9 implies they don't use the technical term for bassoon players
    I don't really think it's accurate to call that "the technical term for bassoon players." Certainly a form of this word is used in several non-English languages, but I don't think I've ever heard it used in English except with humorous intent.@dkf said:
    Or for small bundles of kindling.
    This is, of course, the source of the word used in many languages for the instrument English speakers call a bassoon; it looks like a very small bundle (2) of rather large sticks. However, according to a rather old edition of The American Heritage Dictionary, the prefered spelling for a bundle of sticks has only a single 'g,' as do the Italian, German, Russian and one of the two Spanish words for bassoon (the other Spanish word being cognate to bassoon), while #9 always has two.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @da Doctah said:
    #9 implies they don't use the technical term for bassoon players
    I don't really think it's accurate to call that "the technical term for bassoon players." Certainly a form of this word is used in several non-English languages, but I don't think I've ever heard it used in English except with humorous intent.@dkf said:
    Or for small bundles of kindling.
    This is, of course, the source of the word used in many languages for the instrument English speakers call a bassoon; it looks like a very small bundle (2) of rather large sticks. However, according to a rather old edition of The American Heritage Dictionary, the prefered spelling for a bundle of sticks has only a single 'g,' as do the Italian, German, Russian and one of the two Spanish words for bassoon (the other Spanish word being cognate to bassoon), while #9 always has two.
    What are you, some sort of basson player or something?



  • @El_Heffe said:

    What are you, some sort of basson player or something?
    No, but some of my best friends are.

    @El_Heffe said:

    Filed under: I shall begin using Basoon Player as an insult
    If you want to insult someone, call them an oboe player. Other musicians claim the high air pressure required to play the oboe causes brain damage. Or a Zippel Fagotist.



  • You also missed the correct term for a female canine. My mother in law once won "best bitch" at a show.



  • @HardwareGeek said:

    @El_Heffe said:
    What are you, some sort of basson player or something?
    No, but some of my best friends are.
    That's what the anti-bassoonites.always say.

     



  • @Zemm said:

    My mother in law once won "best bitch" at a show.
    And it wasn't a dog show.



Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.