Reverse mystery-meat navigation



  • As far as web design is concerned, church websites are their own special brand of cautionary tale, but this is the first time I've seen reverse-Mystery-Meat navigation like this.



  • (...)



  • I don't get it.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I don't get it.
     

    [Insert joke about not accepting Jebus here]

    ...

    I think it's because each section of the door is a hyperlink. There are 4 sections, and each of them has 3 different things.  You'd expect you could click on any of those 12 things and be taken to any one of 12 individual pages.

    Clicking on a section takes you to another page with links to each of those 3 things. You then have to click on one of those 3 links.

    Each of the aforementioned links contains WAAAAY too much information about what it's linking to. So rather than weird, undecypherable UI that doesn't give you any information about where it goes-- each UI link gives you WAAAAY too much information about where it goes (and breaks down further when you go there).

    I think. I might be wrong.



  • No; Art, History & Architecture is one subsection of the site that contains 4 pieces of content, none of which are named "art", "history", or "architecture". I don't know what you're talking about Lorne, because the site doesn't match your description.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    I don't get it.
    [Insert joke about not accepting Jebus here]

    ...

    I think it's because each section of the door is a hyperlink. There are 4 sections, and each of them has 3 different things.  You'd expect you could click on any of those 12 things and be taken to any one of 12 individual pages.

    Clicking on a section takes you to another page with links to each of those 3 things. You then have to click on one of those 3 links.

    Each of the aforementioned links contains WAAAAY too much information about what it's linking to. So rather than weird, undecypherable UI that doesn't give you any information about where it goes-- each UI link gives you WAAAAY too much information about where it goes (and breaks down further when you go there).

    I think. I might be wrong.

    I'm seeing something completely different.  The door has 6 sections.  As soon as I move my mouse over any of them, the text goes flying off and disappers, leaving a blank door panel with nothing to click on.  The only thing that is clickable on the entire page is the logo at the top left, and it just contains a link to the page you are already on.

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I don't get it.
     

    The labels vanish when you point at them.



  • @dhromed said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    I don't get it.
    The labels vanish when you point at them.
    Yes.

    It turns out that when the text disappers, it is replaced by a link that says "Pleas come it".  Except in Firefox, you can't see it.  If you move your mouse just exactly into the right position the pointer turns into a hand which means you're over the link, even though you can't see it.

     



  • Not on my computer, which is far superior to yours and also I am awesome.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    Except in Firefox, you can't see it.  If you move your mouse just exactly into the right position the pointer turns into a hand which means you're over the link, even though you can't see it.
     

    I can see it just fine.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Not on my computer, which is far superior to yours and also I am awesome.
     

    You're saying there is no vanishing animation of any sort when you hover the door?

    @blakeyrat said:

    also I am awesome.

    I'm gonna let this slide, but only because of your stop it, stop it, stop it, stop it punches in Zeno clash, which was a very amusing bit.

     



  • (double checks).  Ah, NoScript, FTW. Having it enabled makes the site usable (for once).



  • Try pulling up the Church Bulletin; for me it renders a completely unusable, unscrollable viewer control at the bottom of the page, sized so that I can only see half of each page and cannot scroll left - right to see the remainder.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    Having it enabled makes the site usable (for once).
     

    I don't second your "for once". NoScript makes half the web usable, and breaks the other half.

    With whitelists, that's a very big net positive.



  • @Mcoder said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    Having it enabled makes the site usable (for once).
     

    I don't second your "for once". NoScript makes half the web usable, and breaks the other half.

    With whitelists, that's a very big net positive.

     

    Someone didn't get my sarcasm (for once)

     



  • @El_Heffe said:

    leaving a blank door panel with nothing to click on

    Not that it matters in this case, but it sounds like your browser isn't displaying the "Please, come in!" link that slides up from the bottom of each panel. Why they didn't just make the whole region a link and do the animations with in that, I have on idea. But the clickable parts are all animated.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Lorne Kates said:

    (double checks).  Ah, NoScript, FTW. Having it enabled makes the site usable (for once).

    Snort. Quick, look left at your avatar.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Soviut said:

    @El_Heffe said:
    leaving a blank door panel with nothing to click on

    Not that it matters in this case, but it sounds like your browser isn't displaying the "Please, come in!" link that slides up from the bottom of each panel. Why they didn't just make the whole region a link and do the animations with in that, I have on idea. But the clickable parts are all animated.

    In Chrome, I could only click on the "Please come in" text, and not where the image used to be. That's probably technically correct, depending on how the HTML is written, but it's obnoxious if, say, your mouse happened to stop a couple pixels above where the text ended up being.


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