Click on this mock picture of a button in powerpoint and show me what it does.



  • Five days after being put on a new project I'm tasked with showing a demo of the front-end to some senior execs I've never heard of before or even knew their positions had existed in our company (even though I've been here for 7 months now). Expecting that what they want to see is just a mock-up of what things would look like and work (surely they didn't expect a demo of the actual app 5 days after I started?) I have to hastily throw together some mock ups in powerpoint and head over to the largest board room in our company.

    We dress casually here. I'm in dark jeans with a striped shirt. My boss is similarly dressed - brown pants and a white shirt. These three guys are wearing full suits including the ties. I start the presentation and after a quick intro start going through the flow of how the application would operate. That is to say, I pretend that I "click" on a button, change the slide, and show on the next slide what happens.
    After a few slides of this, one of the execs interrupts me and tells me to back up and click on some button that I did not yet demonstrate. So I start scrolling through the slides to where the function of this button is explained and this guy starts waving his hands and saying "Woah woah woah, stop doing that."
    I stop.
    "Now just back up to where we were before."
    I scroll back through the slides to the point where he interrupted me.
    "Ok, good, now go back."
    I go back a few slides.
    "Right, now, click that button!"
    "Uh... sir, this is powerpoint, I have a slide further that---"
    "I KNOW what powerpoint is! Do you think I'm an IDIOT??!"
    "Sorry, no, I just ---"
    "JUST CLICK THAT BUTTON AND SHOW ME WHAT IT DOES!"
    I stare blankly at him with my mouth still open.
    He mumbles something more about idiots, gets up, comes over to my laptop, pushes me away, and starts clicking on the picture of the button.
    Then he stares at the screen preplexed, and starts clicking on pictures of other buttons. Then he gets frustrated and starts banging on the mouse and growling. Then he storms out, the others leave with him.

    Later on I found out from my boss that the project would likely be cancelled because that guy wasn't impressed.
    TRWTF: I'm still not exactly sure who these guys are and neither does my boss.



  • Why didn't you make the button-click go to the appropriate slide? Powerpoint can do that, you know.

     



  • I'm fully aware, but when I'm given about 45mins to scramble together a presentation of the full program I don't have time for that. I was trying to explain so to the exec. You can call that TRWTF if you want, shrug. I'm just completely lost why this guy exploded like that and didn't even let me get a word in of explanation.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    No, this is front page material. Though I'd say they made the story up. No one is that dumb.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    No one is that dumb.
    "Team-WTF". Enough said.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    No, this is front page material. Though I'd say they made the story up. No one is that dumb.

    Yes, this is front-page material. 1. These are obviously important people, but no one knows who they are. 2. They think that they're so smart that they don't even ask the person who's running the show what is going on. 3. Obviously they're sponsoring the project, but rather than collaborating with the designer to get what they want, they just leave and abandon the project.


    But a [very small] portion of the blame can be placed on the presenter. ANY mockup that runs on a computer can be interpreted by some people as "it's done". A better way to present this, especially after just a few days of work, would have been using paper mockups. Those clearly demonstrate that this is a work-in-progress; and invite those involved to pull out their markers and make changes.


    So many people assume that if I can see it running on the computer, then it is finished; and if it's on the computer it is so much harder to change that you're almost left with "accept it or reject it, but don't change it".



  • @joe.edwards said:

    No, this is front page material. Though I'd say they made the story up. No one is that dumb.

    I didn't think anyone could be either, but I've left out a few things from the story. This happened just 4 hours before I wrote that up and I'm still reeling from the experience. I'm rather timid, so I don't take it well when people yell...
    While I was showing the first few slides of the flow this guy was making comments to his fellows about how "the program" looked "dumb" and why it looked like "the whole monitor had to re-screen" (I have no idea what "re-screen"... or maybe he said "re-scan"? is supposed to mean. Refresh maybe?) every time I clicked.
    My boss quietly clarified that this was powerpoint and that I was changing slides. The exec nodded vigorously but didn't seem to get it, because he kept on making similar comments, and then shortly after interrupted me.

    The first time when he insisted that I click on that button and show him what it does I was about to politely explain the nature of powerpoint to him and that I can show the function of the button on another slide. But then he yelled that he knew what powerpoint was and for a moment I believed him, so I felt ashamed and started apologizing and was about to explain that I'm terribly sorry for not having the time to properly make the buttons go to their correct slides, but he interrupted me again before I could do that.
    When he started clicking all over the slides the illusion that he knew what I was talking about was of course all broken.

    Maybe he isn't as dumb as he looks from my perspective and was angry that I didn't have a proper functioning powerpoint presentation for him? Could be that. But his reaction is still a complete WTF to me.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    We can fix it in post. Garry is presenting to the president's daughter on paper. She snatches up the paper mockups and starts stabbing at them with her pencil like a stylus. Right or wrong, that's the way things were.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    But a [very small] portion of the blame can be placed on the presenter. ANY mockup that runs on a computer can be interpreted by some people as "it's done". A better way to present this, especially after just a few days of work, would have been using paper mockups. Those clearly demonstrate that this is a work-in-progress; and invite those involved to pull out their markers and make changes.

    Thanks for that advice. I'm going to remember that for the future. I've been properly employeed in this industry for only 1.5 years...
    Actually it was my boss who suggested that I do mockups in powerpoint, when I replied, slightly outraged, that there was nothing ready to show.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    It can just look like paper and you'll still get the idea across.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    Though I'd say they made the story up. No one is that dumb.
    It's been well documented over the years that if you show someone a mock-up of a program they will believe that it is a complete and fully functioning program, no matter how many times you tell them that it is just a mock-up.

    Yes, they really are that stupid.



  • I like to use Sketchflow for presentations.  It gives the mock-up a sketchy, less-done look-and-feel so that the customer has some visual cues that it's not yet an actual product.

    Doesn't usually make a difference, but I like to pretend it does.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @joe.edwards said:

    No one is that dumb.



  • Create wireframes with something like Axure to show intent during mockups.

    When showing what a "final screen" will look like, show it in the context of a monitor and/or mobile, so it's obvious that you are displaying screen shots, not the final product.

    Example:
    http://launchrock.co/



  • @garrywong said:



    While I was showing the first few slides of the flow this guy was making comments to his fellows about how "the program" looked "dumb" and why it looked like "the whole monitor had to re-screen" (I have no idea what "re-screen"... or maybe he said "re-scan"? is supposed to mean. Refresh maybe?) every time I clicked.

    My boss quietly clarified that this was powerpoint and that I was changing slides. The exec nodded vigorously but didn't seem to get it, because he kept on making similar comments, and then shortly after interrupted me.

    Since he had no idea what the word "powerpoint" means, I think you should have opened the presentation in edit mode here and casually moved some things around (and stretched some images) just to see if he got it that way.



  • @garrywong said:

    But his reaction is still a complete WTF to me.
     

    That's because his reaction was that of a 2-year old child.  Take it as a lesson that just because someone is gussied up in a suit and gets paid the big money, doesn't mean they know anything at all.  In my experience that's a large indicator that he's likely to be a complete jackass.  As is the case here.



  • You need to start right from the moment they walk in the door. "Hi, sit down, get yourselves comfortable. Now obviously you're not qualified or experienced at all in this field, so you're going to find this very heavy going, but we'll hold your hand and try to stop you making too many idiot mistakes."


    Put them in their place early. Also:

    @garrywong said:

    "JUST CLICK THAT BUTTON AND SHOW ME WHAT IT DOES!"
    "It's an idiot detector."



  • Here's two lessons to learn: 1) if you're right and you know you're right (that second bit is tricky), don't be afraid of fucking anything or anyone. 2) People who wear suits when not required are idiots. Invariably.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    It can just look like paper and you'll still get the idea across.

    Hey, another Balsamiq user!



  • @jetcitywoman said:

    @garrywong said:

    But his reaction is still a complete WTF to me.
     

    That's because his reaction was that of a 2-year old child.

    I endorse this message.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Here's two lessons to learn: 1) if you're right and you know you're right (that second bit is tricky), don't be afraid of fucking anything or anyone. 2) People who wear suits when not required are idiots. Invariably.

    This.



  • @garrywong said:

    I'm just completely lost why this guy exploded like that and didn't even let me get a word in of explanation.

    Empty suit.



  • @garrywong said:

    He mumbles something more about idiots, gets up, comes over to my laptop, pushes me away, and starts clicking on the picture of the button.

    Then he stares at the screen preplexed, and starts clicking on pictures of other buttons. Then he gets frustrated and starts banging on the mouse and growling. Then he storms out, the others leave with him.

    You need to find that guy's workstation, screenshot his desktop, set it as the desktop background, turn off his desktop icons and hide his task bar.



  •  

    @garrywong said:

    Actually it was my boss who suggested that I
    do mockups in powerpoint, when I replied, slightly outraged, that there
    was nothing ready to show.
     

    There's the first WTF. Some that I can spot:

    1. a particularly poor choice of person to create the demonstration - it sounds like you've got the weakest experience of everyone on that project, yet you were chosen to market it
    2. a poor choice of person to deliver the demonstartion - yes, you're a WTF in this regard, but only a minor one. An experienced presenter knows how to shape and guide content to cover the topics in an engaging manner and reduce drift, as well as have techniques to address the situation in which you described (or even prevent it from arising). It sounds like you lost control of the situation and allowed yourself to be led by them. That's not a reflection upon you, maybe a reflection upon the number of times you've presented or been in that situation.
    3. I don't see clear objectives for the presentation - you remarked that you were tasked with "showing a demo"- are you demonstrating what the final product is to look like? in which there should be functional diagrams and mockups that show its intended appearance. Are you demonstrating its functionality? In which case there should be design documentation (such as Use Case diagrams, Activity diagrams, flowcharts, etc) that you could call upon. Did the audience know what the poduct did, and were simply interested in how it did it?
    4. yeah, the exec that behaved like a moron is a major WTF (and his behaviour and attitude certainly shows you didn't have an easy audience) but perhaps he'd been given reasons for attending the presentation which differed from what you'd been told. Expectation management often begins with clarifying the vision from the offset, and there isn't a great deal of indication your boss has kept you properly informed. 



  • It sounds to me like the 'exec.' was under some kind of pressure to 'go see what the developers are up to' and forced the presentation on Garry's boss at short notice.

    Garry's boss — perhaps knowing the suit-guy is a total idiot and PITA? — may have deliberately made Garry the cannon-fodder. Every organisation has >=1 total asshole that NOBODY wants to deal with. Ever. Hence: the newbie invariably gets the short straw.

    It may even be the case that Garry's boss wanted the project to be killed, and (knowing the clowns liable to turn up at the presentation) saw this as an excellent way to get the project killed by the Suits. ("Who, me? No, I'm actually sad that we won't now be doing the project." [THINKS: evil cackle]).

    I do agree that (if this is what happened) not showing the mock-up in some kind of frame to visually indicate THIS IS A MOCK-UP! NOT THE REAL THING! to the morons was a bit of an own-goal, but it's also hilarious to see these muppets demonstrate their total lack of knowledge whilst blustering that yes, they do know what they're doing. Personally, I would have found it very difficult not to burst out laughing when the Suit started blindly and randomly clicking what he thought were working buttons.

    PS: +1000 to the idea of turning this Suit's desktop into an image and waiting for him to smash up his computer in frustration!



  • @Cassidy said:

    a particularly poor choice of person to create the demonstration - it sounds like you've got the weakest experience of everyone on that project, yet you were chosen to market it
    Where does it say there's anyone else but him working on this?  And he wasn't chosen to "market" it.  That's something entirely differnt than just showing a demo of a project that isn't anywhere near fininshed. @Cassidy said:
    An experienced presenter knows how to shape and guide content to cover the topics in an engaging manner and reduce drift,
    Assuming that the OP is telling the truth, he only had a very short amount of time to prepare the presentation.  And he didn't go into it thinking it was anything other than a raw demo, which is perfectly understandable in that situation.@Cassidy said:
    I don't see clear objectives for the presentation - you remarked that you were tasked with "showing a demo"- are you demonstrating what the final product is to look like? in which there should be functional diagrams and mockups that show its intended appearance. Are you demonstrating its functionality? In which case there should be design documentation
    Again, he only had a very short amount of tme to prepare. And, his understanding of the purpose of the presentation was obvious much different than the so-called "executives".  I am an experience presenter and I've been in similar situations.

    At first, I thought the OP's big mistake was not announcing clearly up front that this was a raw demo.  But it's clear that it wouldn't have made any difference.  For example, the "exeutive" who proclaimed "I know what Powerpoint is.  I'm not an idiot".   Why did he demand that the OP go back to a previous slide and click on a particular button?  He didn't want an explanation of what the button does, no, he wanted the OP to click on the button and show him what it does.  He obviously has no idea what presentation software is and apparently thinks that the company's product is written in Powerpoint.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    Where does it say there's anyone else but him working on this?
     

    It doesn't, but I took his singular "I'm tasked with... I have to hastily throw together..." rather than "we're tasked with... we had to hastily throw together..." to imply designing and delivering the presentation was a solo effort.

    @El_Heffe said:

    Assuming that the OP is telling the truth, he only had a very short amount of time to prepare the presentation

    I'm aware that shortness of time will impact upon the quality of the presentation design - but if you're an experienced presenter, do you have some mental plan of topics to cover, a path to follow - or do you allow your materials and audience to shape and guide the final delivery?

    @El_Heffe said:

    And, his understanding of the purpose of the presentation was obvious much different than the so-called "executives".

    So you agree with me that the objectives weren't clear for the presentation - or at least differed between presenter and audience.

    @El_Heffe said:

    At first, I thought the OP's big mistake was not announcing clearly up front that this was a raw demo. 

    My point was that while the OP made some mistakes, but he wasn't the only one to make mistakes. 



  • @Cassidy said:

    My point was that while the OP made some mistakes
    Only when viewed with 20/20 hindsight.@Cassidy said:
    @El_Heffe said:
    And, his understanding of the purpose of the presentation was obvious much different than the so-called "executives".
    So you agree with me that the objectives weren't clear for the presentation - or at least differed between presenter and audience.
    That's two different things.  The objective was clear.  Show them a rough demo of the program.  If the audience hadn't been made up of morons (something that will sometimes catch you by surprise no matter how experienced you are), things would have proceded normally.  The problem occurs when one of the "executives" yells: @garrywong said:
    "JUST CLICK THAT BUTTON AND SHOW ME WHAT IT DOES!"
    Now, with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight, the obvious correct response was "That button doesn't actually do anything, it's just there to give you an idea of what the program looks like".  But, in the heat of the moment, expecially if you're feeling a bit intimidated by some guys in suits (been there, done that) your initial reaction is just to stand there and think to yourself "What the fuck is this idiot talking about?"

    I have been in the OP's situation.  You have to throw together whatever you can, as fast as you can, and you don't worry about it being anywhere near perfect, or even good, because you know that half the people will understand what you're talking about and the other half don't give a shit (or won't be paying attention).  And then one day you run into a level of stupidity that no sane person could possibly anticipate.

     



  • IRL I would probably say:

    Oh! It does thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii (as I go forward through the slides) iiiiiiiiiiis. It takes you to this screen.



  • @notchulance said:

    IRL I would probably say:

    Oh! It does thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii (as I go forward through the slides) iiiiiiiiiiis. It takes you to this screen.

    I'd be sorely tempted to walk up to the projector screen, press the projected image of the button with my finger, and say "BOOP!" in a loud clear voice.

    Then I'd arrange to send one of these to the guy with a note saying "knowing how fond you are of pushing buttons that don't do anything, I thought you'd enjoy this":

     



  •  @Cad Delworth said:

    It sounds to me like the 'exec.' was under some kind of pressure to 'go see what the developers are up to' and forced the presentation on Garry's boss at short notice.

    Garry's boss — perhaps knowing the suit-guy is a total idiot and PITA? — may have deliberately made Garry the cannon-fodder. Every organisation has >=1 total asshole that NOBODY wants to deal with. Ever. Hence: the newbie invariably gets the short straw.

    It may even be the case that Garry's boss wanted the project to be killed, and (knowing the clowns liable to turn up at the presentation) saw this as an excellent way to get the project killed by the Suits. ("Who, me? No, I'm actually sad that we won't now be doing the project." [THINKS: evil cackle]).

    I do agree that (if this is what happened) not showing the mock-up in some kind of frame to visually indicate THIS IS A MOCK-UP! NOT THE REAL THING! to the morons was a bit of an own-goal, but it's also hilarious to see these muppets demonstrate their total lack of knowledge whilst blustering that yes, they do know what they're doing. Personally, I would have found it very difficult not to burst out laughing when the Suit started blindly and randomly clicking what he thought were working buttons.

    PS: +1000 to the idea of turning this Suit's desktop into an image and waiting for him to smash up his computer in frustration!

    This. Respecially about his boss wanting to get the project killed. Will it sounds mean and stupid, often it's just the only way to get something idiotic killed becausemanagmeent is usually immune and to stupid anyway to understand your argument so you have to it the indirect way.

     And the the screenshot of his desktop thing sounds amazing. ideally set it up as a startup script that is stored in his profile if he kill shis PC and gets a new one the same thing will happen again and again. :D 

     



  • @El_Heffe said:

    That's two different things.  The objective was clear.  Show them a rough demo of the program.  If the audience hadn't been made up of morons (something that will sometimes catch you by surprise no matter how experienced you are), things would have proceded normally.
     

    Meh, I dunno - if expectations of the audience and presenter differ, then there's a good chance this wasn't clarified prior to the demo commencing.

    I mean Garry was told "show them a rough demo" but the audience had been told "attend this room where our new product will be demonstrated" and these objectives weren't compared form the outset, you'll always get deviation despite your skill as a presenter or the amount of preparation.

    Either way, the guy still acted like a moron, but he could have been acting upon different information to Gary. Still doesn't excuse his behaviour, though.

    @El_Heffe said:

    And then one day you run into a level of stupidity that no sane person could possibly anticipate.

    Say... I know someone with a cluebat going spare. You interested? 



  • @El_Heffe said:

    Now, with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight, the obvious correct response was "That button doesn't actually do anything, it's just there to give you an idea of what the program looks like". 

    Surely (with 21/20 hindsight) the correct response is "That's not a button - it's a picture of what the button will probably look like when we come to write the application."
    Whether that would elicit any different response is another question.

    But my guess is that they were beancounters on a search and destroy mission to cut costs and secure bonuses. The project was probably doomed from the moment they knotted their ties...



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    @joe.edwards said:
    It can just look like paper and you'll still get the idea across.

    Hey, another Balsamiq user!

    How long until some genius skins an app to look like this, and then everybody wants one...

    (Cue somebody helpfully pointing out that this has already happened...)



  • @Cassidy said:

    Meh, I dunno - if expectations of the audience and presenter differ, then there's a good chance this wasn't clarified prior to the demo commencing.

    It only becomes a problem when the audience is clueless. When was the last time you went to the cinema and exclaimed "this movie sucks!" at the opening commercials?



  • @Cad Delworth said:

    PS: +1000 to the idea of turning this Suit's desktop into an image and waiting for him to smash up his computer in frustration!
    This works even better when you only hide some icons.



  • @ender said:

    @Cad Delworth said:
    PS: +1000 to the idea of turning this Suit's desktop into an image and waiting for him to smash up his computer in frustration!
    This works even better when you only hide some icons.

    I, for one, wouldn't want to get on your bad side.



  • @ender said:

    @Cad Delworth said:
    PS: +1000 to the idea of turning this Suit's desktop into an image and waiting for him to smash up his computer in frustration!
    This works even better when you only hide some icons.

    For this particular goose it might be fun to make a Powerpoint slideshow out of, say, a dozen screenshots with assorted menus and windows in various states of openness, then put a batch file in Startup that launches Powerpoint, waits for it to exit, launches it, waits for it to exit...



  • @Faxmachinen said:

    @Cassidy said:

    Meh, I dunno - if expectations of the audience and presenter differ, then there's a good chance this wasn't clarified prior to the demo commencing.

    It only becomes a problem when the audience is clueless.

     

    And yet I took a clueful audience to attend a presentation of some new software being developed for us in which we'd been given assurances bugs had been fixed which would be demonstrated at working only to sit through an hour of "new features", none of which (a) we needed, and (b) didn't resemble core functionality previously shown to be flawed.

    After a few requests to show evidence that our desired functionality worked properly, the presenter shuffled his feet and admitted that wasn't what he was there to show, glanced awkwardly at the sales droid who examined his pen in silent embarrassment, then the show was handed over to a coder who stammered a confirmation that it all worked but - alas - couldn't show us the working version.

    It was clear to me that different messages had been communicated to us and the presenter. It also wasn't totally clear - from the behaviour of the squirming coder - that all the bugs had been ironed out.

    Bloody waste of time.

    @Faxmachinen said:

    When was the last time you went to the cinema and exclaimed "this movie sucks!" at the opening commercials?

    That's not an expression commonly used in Britain, so I've never heard it in a cinema. But if your point is confusing the commercials with the film, we usually have screens popping up announcing that commercials are running, then another that indicates you're watching trailers before a certificate shows to indicate the start of the film. Making it clear upfront tends to take much of the guesswork out.

     



  • @flabdablet said:

    @garrywong said:
    He mumbles something more about idiots, gets up, comes over to my laptop, pushes me away, and starts clicking on the picture of the button.

    Then he stares at the screen preplexed, and starts clicking on pictures of other buttons. Then he gets frustrated and starts banging on the mouse and growling. Then he storms out, the others leave with him.

    You need to find that guy's workstation, screenshot his desktop, set it as the desktop background, turn off his desktop icons and hide his task bar.

     I did that once, to my boss, years ago, in retaliation to a practical joke of his. Told him my next step would be to redefine all his fonts to move every letter one key to the left, and redefine his keyboard to move every letter one key to the right. That way, everything would look right and print right, but the spell checker would tell him every single word was misspelled.[1]

    He decided we could have a cease fire on the pranks.

     [1]In truth, I'd have just set the spell check to French. He wouldn't have figured it out.



  • @Cassidy said:

    There's the first WTF. Some that I can spot:

    1. a particularly poor choice of person to create the demonstration
    2. a poor choice of person to deliver the demonstartion
    3. I don't see clear objectives for the presentation

     These are all based on the assumption that whoever made the decision on who to have do the demo wanted the project to continue. I suspect the clear objective was, in fact, to get the project canceled.



  • @taustin said:

    These are all based on the assumption that whoever made the decision on who to have do the demo wanted the project to continue.
     

    Correct.

    @taustin said:

    I suspect the clear objective the hidden objective was, in fact, to get the project canceled.

    I can see that now, looking back at the way things unfolded.

    Well, I'd like to think that. In reality I've encountered many organisations for which chaotic mismanagement is par for the course.

     



  • Ceci n'est pas un bouton.



  • @fatbull said:

    Ceci n'est pas un bouton.

     



  • @taustin said:

    I suspect the clear objective was, in fact, to get the project canceled.
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.



  • @DrPepper said:

    ANY mockup that runs on a computer can be interpreted by some people as "it's done".
     

    This is the exact reason why I always complete the homepage as the last item of any heavy web application. Show a client the homepage, and he'll simply assume that everything is working already, or that you're slacking.



  • @daveime said:

    This is the exact reason why I always complete the homepage as the last item of any heavy web application. Show a client the homepage, and he'll simply assume that everything is working already, or that you're slacking.

    You have added a lot to this discussion. I know about 6 people in this thread already posted that exact thought but I'm sure all of them, me included, were just crossing our fingers and hoping daveime would chime in.

    And you have. Bless you.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @taustin said:

    I suspect the clear objective was, in fact, to get the project canceled.
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

    I always found it less depressing to attribute to malice, as I find the idea people are out to get everyone else not as bad as them constantly doing it on accident.



  • @garrywong said:

    While I was showing the first few slides of the flow this guy was making comments to his fellows about how "the program" looked "dumb" and why it looked like "the whole monitor had to re-screen" (I have no idea what "re-screen"... or maybe he said "re-scan"? is supposed to mean. Refresh maybe?) every time I clicked.

    My boss quietly clarified that this was powerpoint and that I was changing slides. The exec nodded vigorously but didn't seem to get it, because he kept on making similar comments, and then shortly after interrupted me.
    I think, for the future, you may wish to write such demos using the Qt framework. Whether you want to use the classic way of doing things (QWidget & friends) or the declarative QML, you'd have had something that actually reacts to clicks in about the same time. Not that I'm vindicating the execs, they are beyond dumb and have no business being in the company that they are.


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