Failure to grasp the concept



  • Telemarketer: “Hi, this is [name]. Can I interest you in a subscription to [newspaper]?”

    Me: “No, thank you. I’m not interested.”

    Telemarketer: “Why not? Is it too expensive? We also offer Sunday/Wednesday-only subscriptions.”

    Me: “There are hundreds of free news sources online now. I get all of my news online. I just don’t need it; I’m sorry.”

    Telemarketer: “But ink cartridges are expensive. Doesn’t it cost a lot more to print all your own news?”



  • If you're going to steal from NotAlwaysWorking, you should at least credit the source.



  • @Thrillho said:

    If you're going to steal from NotAlwaysWorking, you should at least credit the source.

    Also, why hide the name of the newspaper? It's not like he works for them. Name and shame!



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Thrillho said:

    If you're going to steal from NotAlwaysWorking, you should at least credit the source.

    Also, why hide the name of the newspaper? It's not like he works for them. Name and shame!


    They still distribute news on dead tree, they're already shamed.



  • TRWTF is plagiarism.



  • @Ben L. said:

    TRWTF is plagiarism.

    No, TRWTF is plagiarism.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Lorne Kates said:
    TRWTF is plagiarism.

    No, TRWTF is plagiarism.

    Just what the fuck are you accusing me of?



  • @Thrillho said:

    If you're going to steal from NotAlwaysWorking, you should at least credit the source.
    @Ben L. said:
    TRWTF is plagiarism.
    You are correct of course.  I'm sorry.  I was led astray by the money and fame that comes with passing along something I found humorous.  I will strive to do better in the future.

     



  • @All my own work said:

    @All my own work said:
    TRWTF is plagiarism.

    No, TRWTF is plagiarism.

    Actually, TRWTF is plagiarism.



  • @Thrillho said:

    If you're going to steal from NotAlwaysWorking, you should at least credit the source.
    Well, talk about not grasping the concept: if he were to credit the source, it wouldn't be stealing anymore...

     



  • If that's really you in the story, you can report the newspaper to the FCC for violating the do-not-call registry. The only reason this doesn't seem to work anymore is because all the shady telemarketing companies are fly-by-night foreign-owned ones, but if it's definitely tied back to an American-owned company you can report them.



  • @MiffTheFox said:

    If that's really you in the story, you can report the newspaper to the FCC for violating the do-not-call registry. The only reason this doesn't seem to work anymore is because all the shady telemarketing companies are fly-by-night foreign-owned ones, but if it's definitely tied back to an American-owned company you can report them.

    Eh, it doesn't work for domestic companies, either. I used to get tons of calls from this automated recording trying to sell home security systems. I reported them to the FCC a dozen times (not only am I on the DNC, but the number was a cellphone which is illegal to do that kind of random telemarketing to.) Times I heard back from the FCC: 0. I doubt anybody ever read my report. I did stop getting the calls, but probably only because I changed my number.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @MiffTheFox said:

    If that's really you in the story, you can report the newspaper to the FCC for violating the do-not-call registry. The only reason this doesn't seem to work anymore is because all the shady telemarketing companies are fly-by-night foreign-owned ones, but if it's definitely tied back to an American-owned company you can report them.

    Eh, it doesn't work for domestic companies, either. I used to get tons of calls from this automated recording trying to sell home security systems. I reported them to the FCC a dozen times (not only am I on the DNC, but the number was a cellphone which is illegal to do that kind of random telemarketing to.) Times I heard back from the FCC: 0. I doubt anybody ever read my report. I did stop getting the calls, but probably only because I changed my number.

    I can skip all of those steps by never giving my phone number to anything other than Google's two-factor authentication and having my phone turned off when I'm not verifying my identity.

    As a bonus, I don't have to worry about having friends.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @MiffTheFox said:

    If that's really you in the story, you can report the newspaper to the FCC for violating the do-not-call registry. The only reason this doesn't seem to work anymore is because all the shady telemarketing companies are fly-by-night foreign-owned ones, but if it's definitely tied back to an American-owned company you can report them.

    Eh, it doesn't work for domestic companies, either. I used to get tons of calls from this automated recording trying to sell home security systems. I reported them to the FCC a dozen times (not only am I on the DNC, but the number was a cellphone which is illegal to do that kind of random telemarketing to.) Times I heard back from the FCC: 0. I doubt anybody ever read my report. I did stop getting the calls, but probably only because I changed my number.

    I think the FTC was thinking bigger picture



  • @russ0519 said:

    I think the FTC was thinking bigger picture

    Lame. My solution was to use drone strikes against suspected telemarketers. We have the technology to extrajudicially kill civilians, why aren't we using it (domestically)?



  • @Ben L. said:

    I can skip all of those steps by never giving my phone number to anything other than Google's two-factor authentication and having my phone turned off when I'm not verifying my identity.

    The thing is, I don't even think they got my number from anyone, I think they were just doing the equivalent of war dialing. And once they got an answer on my number, they called me every single morning for 6 months straight.



  • The Federal Trade Commission announced that judges for the FTC Robocall Challenge selected two winners, in a tie for the $50,000 prize for Best Overall Solution to block illegal robocalls. The challenge, designed to help solve this problem by spurring innovation in the marketplace, garnered nearly 800 eligible submissions.

    Here's my fucking proposal for stopping "robocalls":

    1. You get an illegal call
    2. You report it immediately after hanging up to whoever is in charge of those things.
    3. They trace the call
    4. They find the phone line the call was made from
    5. They arrest the fucking phone spammer

    It shouldn't be that hard. It's not like they are using hacked phones as proxies to make their calls (I hope). Of course that would require a police that's not made of incompetent morons and, worse, a telecommunications company that's not made of incompetent morons.



  • @spamcourt said:

    The Federal Trade Commission announced that judges for the FTC Robocall Challenge selected two winners, in a tie for the $50,000 prize for Best Overall Solution to block illegal robocalls. The challenge, designed to help solve this problem by spurring innovation in the marketplace, garnered nearly 800 eligible submissions.

    Here's my fucking proposal for stopping "robocalls":

    1. You get an illegal call
    2. You report it immediately after hanging up to whoever is in charge of those things.
    3. They trace the call
    4. They find the phone line the call was made from
    5. They arrest the fucking phone spammer

    It shouldn't be that hard. It's not like they are using hacked phones as proxies to make their calls (I hope). Of course that would require a police that's not made of incompetent morons and, worse, a telecommunications company that's not made of incompetent morons.

    Considering that even in movies, where everything is super easy and exaggerated, you need to stay on the line for a minute for them to trace you (while you're on the phone), I don't think it's that easy. Plus in these days of VOIP, I'm sure it's easier said then done.



  • @russ0519 said:

    Considering that even in movies, where everything is super easy and exaggerated, you need to stay on the line for a minute for them to trace you (while you're on the phone), I don't think it's that easy. Plus in these days of VOIP, I'm sure it's easier said then done.

    Wrong. Movies make things exciting, not necessarily easy. Tracing a call (well, within the US, at least) is really easy. In fact, it can be done retroactively (the police don't need to be around to do it.) Carriers keep logs of routing info for calls.

    And for cellphones, it's even easier because they can also tap into the built-in GPS that is mandated for E911 services, and track where the phone is. They don't even need a warrant to do this.

    As for VoIP, if it ties into the landline system, it's trackable, by law.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @russ0519 said:
    Considering that even in movies, where everything is super easy and exaggerated, you need to stay on the line for a minute for them to trace you (while you're on the phone), I don't think it's that easy. Plus in these days of VOIP, I'm sure it's easier said then done.

    Wrong. Movies make things exciting, not necessarily easy. Tracing a call (well, within the US, at least) is really easy. In fact, it can be done retroactively (the police don't need to be around to do it.) Carriers keep logs of routing info for calls.

    And for cellphones, it's even easier because they can also tap into the built-in GPS that is mandated for E911 services, and track where the phone is. They don't even need a warrant to do this.

    As for VoIP, if it ties into the landline system, it's trackable, by law.

    But who has a landline phone anymore?



  • @spamcourt said:

    The Federal Trade Commission announced that judges for the FTC Robocall Challenge selected two winners, in a tie for the $50,000 prize for Best Overall Solution to block illegal robocalls. The challenge, designed to help solve this problem by spurring innovation in the marketplace, garnered nearly 800 eligible submissions.

    Here's my fucking proposal for stopping "robocalls":

    1. You get an illegal call
    2. You report it immediately after hanging up to whoever is in charge of those things.
    3. They trace the call
    4. They find the phone line the call was made from
    5. They arrest the fucking phone spammer

    It shouldn't be that hard. It's not like they are using hacked phones as proxies to make their calls (I hope). Of course that would require a police that's not made of incompetent morons and, worse, a telecommunications company that's not made of incompetent morons.

    Yes, in theory this is a perfect method for eliminating phone spam.  And I would personally be happy to help out by executing a few phone spammers myself.  Unfortunately, you left out a couple of very important things.  There isn't just one phone spammer, there are [some very large number] and they make [some large number] of phone calls.  So in step 2 you have to have a system that can handle a very large volume of complaints and step 3 requires a large number of people to act on those complaints.  And all those people are unlikely to work for free.

    And, each complaint would have to be investigated.  Otherwise, what prevents me from reporting you as a spammer, and causing you some amount of grief, simply because I don't like you?  That's more people and more expense.  Even with substantial automation, you're looking at an enormous cost for people and equipment.  And that's why the Do Not Call list is a farce that does nothing to reduce phone spam.  Without enforcement it's meaningless, but meaningful enforcement would require someone to authorize the spending of $XXX Gazillion dollars, which then leads into a debate about whether there might be better ways to spend that money, and the whole thing goes nowhere.  And, unfortuantely, the phone spammers know this.

     



  • @russ0519 said:

    But who has a landline phone anymore?

    What? No, I'm saying if VoIP ties in with the public phone system (i.e. "interconnected VoIP", as opposed to something like Skype-to-Skype calls) then it can be traced.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @russ0519 said:
    But who has a landline phone anymore?

    What? No, I'm saying if VoIP ties in with the public phone system (i.e. "interconnected VoIP", as opposed to something like Skype-to-Skype calls) then it can be traced.

     

    From the bullshit excuses I've heard the useless fucks at the CRTC (Canadian FCC) give for not being able to do their fucking job:

    Most of the calls come from overseas. India. Sure it enters the phone system, but it also crosses carriers.  The carriers basically "trust" each other to send the correct information. So once India Donkey Tin Can Communications sends the call to AT&T, there's no way to trace it back. And all the "sender" information can be as bullshit filled as a bullshit caravan.

    Which is course a load of bloody stools filled with shards of glass and mayo.  Marketplace (invesitgative journalist / consumer rights program on the CBC) was able to very easily track the origins of one of these companies, go to India, embed a reporter with a hidden camera, and get the owners ON VIDEO going "We're doing this illegal shit for money and fuck anyone who tries to stop us because they're toothless assholes with fuck-useless laws" (only slight paraphrase).

    They took this to the CRTC and said "Find them an punish them."  CRTC says "No one can find them."  Marketplace says "We did. Here's where they are." CRTC says "That's nice. I think we're doing a good enough job doing nothing."

    So if tracing them and proving their identity, intent and location is that easy-- I say bring on the drones. Send in few first to loudspeaker "Hey assholes who are just trying to eek a living out of your miserable lives-- leave now. We're blowing up this building in 5 minutes. If your supervisor tries to leave, slice his Achilles tendon. Upload the footage to Youtube and we'll send you ten year's salary. This message will not be repeated."

    You can bet the cost:risk ratio of running a telespammer business will drop pretty damn quick after the first few strikes.



  • I don't know about you guys, but I can't remember the last time I got a telemarketing call. I guess it helps that I have google voice. I wonder if they block spam calls for me?



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    The thing is, I don't even think they got my number from anyone, I think they were just doing the equivalent of war dialing. And once they got an answer on my number, they called me every single morning for 6 months straight.
     

    This appears to be precisely what they're doing; I changed my number twice, both times getting one "close" to my old number. The scammers got the new number both times, the first time within the same day, the second within a few minutes.

    @spamcourt said:


    Here's my fucking proposal for stopping "robocalls":

    1. You get an illegal call
    2. You report it immediately after hanging up to whoever is in charge of those things.
    3. They trace the call

    Unfortunately, this plan falls apart at Step #3- unlike in the movies, it turns out these calls are actually untracable. Despite several reports to the FCC, the FTC, and multiple police reports for harassment being filed, the only answer I could ever get back is that there is nothing I can do but change my number (see above).

    @morbiuswilters said:

    As for VoIP, if it ties into the landline system, it's trackable, by law.

    This would be great, if fly-by-night VoIP operators followed the law. They don't.


    I have currently suspended my cell service; at this time, this appears to be the only way to stop the calls.



  • @russ0519 said:

    I don't know about you guys, but I can't remember the last time I got a telemarketing call. I guess it helps that I have google voice. I wonder if they block spam calls for me?
     

    Google Voice actually does block the bulk of them. Unfortunately, this is utterly pointless, as the scammers call both the Voice number and my provider number; calls to the latter are unfiltered, and there is no possible way to permit calls only from Voice.

    Also, incoming picture messages are silently sent to oblivion, which is pretty damned retarded.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    And once they got an answer on my number, they called me every single morning for 6 months straight.

    Pick up, say "Hang on a minute", and then leave your phone in a quiet place until they hang up? Or do you get charged for incoming calls?



  • @pjt33 said:

    Pick up, say "Hang on a minute", and then leave your phone in a quiet place until they hang up? Or do you get charged for incoming calls?
     

    I tend to do that with my home phone (or keep stringing them along). After a bit I get added to the "don't bother with this time-wasting fuckwit" list.

    Of course, it helps that I use my home phone for very little. It's just a broadband line.



  • @pjt33 said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    And once they got an answer on my number, they called me every single morning for 6 months straight.

    Pick up, say "Hang on a minute", and then leave your phone in a quiet place until they hang up? Or do you get charged for incoming calls?
     

    This gets boring after about the 60th time. Threatening them or their family with grievous bodily harm can prompt some fun reactions, but is otherwise equally ineffective.



  • @SamC said:

    This would be great, if fly-by-night VoIP operators followed the law. They don't.

    Yeah, fair enough, the FCC is supposed to crack down on them, and they've been doing more, but they still seem pretty inept when it comes to enforcement.



  • @pjt33 said:

    Pick up, say "Hang on a minute", and then leave your phone in a quiet place until they hang up?

    It was a voice-recognition robocall. (I didn't know about the voice-recognition until one day I started screaming profanities into the phone and the spiel about home security systems was interrupted and the recording was like "I'm sorry, would you like us to remove you from our call list?" and the recording said they did, but of course they didn't.)

    @pjt33 said:

    Or do you get charged for incoming calls?

    I get invoiced but my plan has an unlimited number of minutes, so it doesn't really matter.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @pjt33 said:
    Pick up, say "Hang on a minute", and then leave your phone in a quiet place until they hang up?

    It was a voice-recognition robocall. (I didn't know about the voice-recognition until one day I started screaming profanities into the phone and the spiel about home security systems was interrupted and the recording was like "I'm sorry, would you like us to remove you from our call list?" and the recording said they did, but of course they didn't.)

     

    I discovered this the exact same way. It used to be that only the intro was pre-recorded, and an operator would pick up after that, but virtually all of the ones I'd gotten recently had been fully automated systems. Swearing/threatening to kill/fold/spindle/mutilate a computer is nowhere near as fun as doing it to a human operator.



  • I got an odd style of telemarketing call this afternoon. They called me and then immediately hung up, with the intent to be called back.

    Once that was done with though I just long-pressed the number in the call log and hit "add to reject list". My phones runs a shitty hack of Android 2 so it probably shows up in pure Android 4 and almost definitely does in Cyanogenmod.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    @MiffTheFox said:

    I got an odd style of telemarketing call this afternoon. They called me and then immediately hung up, with the intent to be called back.

    The only one that really mad was the one that called me and put me on hold.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    @MiffTheFox said:
    I got an odd style of telemarketing call this afternoon. They called me and then immediately hung up, with the intent to be called back.

    The only one that really mad was the one that called me and put me on hold.

    I don't want to think about the WTFs that would cause a telemarketer to put someone on hold.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    A machine greeted me and asked me to please hold for the next available representative. I wonder how that's working out for them.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    A machine greeted me and asked me to please hold for the next available representative. I wonder how that's working out for them.

    Pro: You get to talk to a real person

    Con: You have to wait in line to not give a fuck about what they're selling



  • @russ0519 said:

    I don't know about you guys, but I can't remember the last time I got a telemarketing call. I guess it helps that I have google voice. I wonder if they block spam calls for me?

    I have never gotten a random spam call on my mobile in 13 years of having it. And the number is/was even on a few of my domains public whois records. I have gotten a few spam calls from companies I have dealt with (upselling) but that doesn't count as robocalling.

    My landline however, gets lots of calls from "Microsoft" and other shady types. I only have it for ADSL.



  • @joe.edwards said:

    A machine greeted me and asked me to please hold for the next available representative. I wonder how that's working out for them.
    Predictive dialing



  • @joe.edwards said:

    A machine greeted me and asked me to please hold for the next available representative. I wonder how that's working out for them.
     

    This practise is being stamped out in UK - a machine is wardialing and then connecting an answered call to any free salesdroid in the pool, the intention being that the salesdroids shouldn't waste time dialing and waiting.

    However it backfires on them if count(answered) > count(free droids) and there's no intro message: people complain of receving calls that cut off after three seconds of silence.


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    Geez. That's scummy, and I work in marketing. (We do web and print, not tele-).



  • @joe.edwards said:

    Geez. That's scummy, and I work in marketing. (We do web and print, not tele-).
     

    "Scummy" is the understatement of the year..

    The ones calling me clearly understand that they're above the law, and can make any claim they want. Theres simply nothing the callee can do about it.

    The usual ploys are the "Rachel" scam (where a rep claiming to be a debt collector threatens legal action if you don't make your late payments immediately), and the "security" scam (where an automated system claims to be a rep from the FBI investigating breakins in my area). Another recurring is where they say you won the lotto/filed a job application/took a survey, and they're calling back for more info. I've even had a few try to sell prescription drugs (Viagra, "oxy", etc) at "discount prices".

    It's gotten worse as of late, as they are now able to call from local numbers (so I can't simply ignore them based on the out-of-state area codes); the only option is to simply accept only text messages (at least, until they start spamming them too).



  • @SamC said:

    It's gotten worse as of late, as they are now able to call from local numbers (so I can't simply ignore them based on the out-of-state area codes); the only option is to simply accept only text messages (at least, until they start spamming them too).

    Too late.

     



  • @BPFH said:

    @SamC said:

    It's gotten worse as of late, as they are now able to call from local numbers (so I can't simply ignore them based on the out-of-state area codes); the only option is to simply accept only text messages (at least, until they start spamming them too).

    Too late.


    Oddly enough, not for me; I only get about one spam text a month, and it almost always happens on my GVoice number, where it goes straight to spam. This is a ton more managable than 60 calls a day that go to both numbers (very few of the ones that go to Voice make it through, but that doesn't matter as the volume of scam calls to my carrier line dwarfs the number of legit calls I recieve).

    Unrelated, but amusing- I had one spam text that did get through this year; upon looking up the whois info on the domain name, I found that it looked real. I took a shot in the dark and called it, reaching the "CEO" of the "company" (some front for a bible camp), and chewed her out for waking me with that 4am text.

     



  • @SamC said:

    The usual ploys are the "Rachel" scam (where a rep claiming to be a debt collector threatens legal action if you don't make your late payments immediately), and the "security" scam (where an automated system claims to be a rep from the FBI investigating breakins in my area). Another recurring is where they say you won the lotto/filed a job application/took a survey, and they're calling back for more info. I've even had a few try to sell prescription drugs (Viagra, "oxy", etc) at "discount prices".
     

    The most brilliant one I've heard of-- and I use the term only because it's so unbelievable elegant that you can't help but admire it-- is where someone calls up with "I'm calling about getting your money back, and some compensation, from the scam case you were a victim of."

    It's brilliant because it automatically self-selects for people who are so predisposed to being scammed that they already have been! It instantly identifies the 100% perfect "demographic" for the scam.

    This doesn't mean that the scammers shouldn't be hunted down and sodomized with a rotorblade drone-- but I'd give them a tip of the hat first.



  •  @Cassidy said:

    @pjt33 said:

    Pick up, say "Hang on a minute", and then leave your phone in a quiet place until they hang up? Or do you get charged for incoming calls?
     

    I tend to do that with my home phone (or keep stringing them along). After a bit I get added to the "don't bother with this time-wasting fuckwit" list.

    Of course, it helps that I use my home phone for very little. It's just a broadband line.

    I used to get a lot of calls to one of my VoIP numbers with a live person trying to telemarket toner and other bullshit office supplies.  So I set up an IVR on Asterisk that's basically a giant loop, and ends with an endless hold until the caller hangs up.  I watched one sit on hold for the "purchasing manager" for 27 minutes one time.  They don't call as much any more.

     



  • @SamC said:

    I took a shot in the dark and called it, reaching the "CEO" of the "company" (some front for a bible camp), and chewed her out for waking me with that 4am text.
    I hope you did it at 4 in the morning.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @russ0519 said:
    But who has a landline phone anymore?

    What? No, I'm saying if VoIP ties in with the public phone system (i.e. "interconnected VoIP", as opposed to something like Skype-to-Skype calls) then it can be traced.

     

    From the bullshit excuses I've heard the useless fucks at the CRTC (Canadian FCC) give for not being able to do their fucking job:

    Most of the calls come from overseas. India. Sure it enters the phone system, but it also crosses carriers.  The carriers basically "trust" each other to send the correct information.

    The Canadian CRTC is nothing like the FCC. It has very limited powers as far as phone is concerned, their jurisdiction is mostly about how telcos behave with their customers and even then there is an overlap with the jurisdiction of other federal and provincial agencies. Most of the issues related to mobiles are handled by its parent agency, Industry Canada.



    It is very difficult in Canada to truly understand what organization is in control. Not only is the federal government a mess, but also many provinces are taking over some duties. As an example, across Canada when you are outside of a specific city limits you are under RCMP jurisdiction, except in Ontario and Quebec where there is a provincial police corps. Another example is the privacy law (PIPEDA), which applies everywhere except Quebec where there is a provincial law. It's a lot like CSS...



  • @ender said:

    @SamC said:
    I took a shot in the dark and called it, reaching the "CEO" of the "company" (some front for a bible camp), and chewed her out for waking me with that 4am text.
    I hope you did it at 4 in the morning.
     

    Due to timezone differences, it was just after 2am where she was, and the line rang for several minutes; I knew it was going to be great when she opened with-
    DO YOU KNOW WHAT TIME IT IS!?

    @drurowin said:

    I used to get a lot of calls to one of
    my VoIP numbers with a live person trying to telemarket toner and other
    bullshit office supplies.  So I set up an IVR on Asterisk that's
    basically a giant loop, and ends with an endless hold until the caller
    hangs up.  I watched one sit on hold for the "purchasing manager" for 27
    minutes one time.  They don't call as much any more.

     

    I
    did this a number of times, made up an excuse, then hit mute and put the
    phone down; I was only successful once (got a "representative from the Federal Taxes Bureau" to wait for 15 mins for
    "my mother to come out of surgery"). It didn't stem the volume at all,
    unfortunately, as most immediately hung up before I even finished the
    "please hold" excuse. Hell, most hung up if the first words out of my mouth weren't my SSN and credit information. Blowing into the mic is fun too, but most seem to have some kind of filtering/volume limiting on their earpieces; again, I only got a decent reaction once out of hundreds of calls.

    @Lorne Kates said:

    "I'm calling about getting your money back,
    and some compensation, from the scam case you were a victim
    of."
     

    Wow, thats a special kind of  evil . The kind of
    horrible, unspeakable things involving red-hot iron and medieval
    instruments of torture that I wouldn't even wish on my worst enemies,
    I'd most certainly wish on these people!
    I've had a handful of
    similar ones though, mostly along the lines of providing legal
    representation for me for personal injury claims, claiming to sue me,
    saying I was past due on taxes, credit payments, etc. Theres just no end
    to it. One guy, same voice even going by the same probably-fake name,
    called twice in one day running two totally different scams!


     



  • @Cassidy said:

    @joe.edwards said:

    A machine greeted me and asked me to please hold for the next available representative. I wonder how that's working out for them.
     

    This practise is being stamped out in UK - a machine is wardialing and then connecting an answered call to any free salesdroid in the pool, the intention being that the salesdroids shouldn't waste time dialing and waiting.

    However it backfires on them if count(answered) > count(free droids) and there's no intro message: people complain of receving calls that cut off after three seconds of silence.

    I think you're wrong there, unless what you meant to say is "This practice is becoming more and more common in the UK". There's lots of noise about it, but any stamping that might be going on doesn't seem to be happening on the heads of the perpetrators.


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